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Closure Compiler

45
54
+ 1
5
Webpack

25.9K
17.8K
+ 1
750
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Closure Compiler vs Webpack: What are the differences?

Developers describe Closure Compiler as "A JavaScript checker and optimizer". The Closure Compiler is a tool for making JavaScript download and run faster. It is a true compiler for JavaScript. Instead of compiling from a source language to machine code, it compiles from JavaScript to better JavaScript. It parses your JavaScript, analyzes it, removes dead code and rewrites and minimizes what's left. It also checks syntax, variable references, and types, and warns about common JavaScript pitfalls. On the other hand, Webpack is detailed as "A bundler for javascript and friends". A bundler for javascript and friends. Packs many modules into a few bundled assets. Code Splitting allows to load parts for the application on demand. Through "loaders" modules can be CommonJs, AMD, ES6 modules, CSS, Images, JSON, Coffeescript, LESS, ... and your custom stuff.

Closure Compiler belongs to "JavaScript Optimizers" category of the tech stack, while Webpack can be primarily classified under "JS Build Tools / JS Task Runners".

Closure Compiler and Webpack are both open source tools. Webpack with 49.8K GitHub stars and 6.27K forks on GitHub appears to be more popular than Closure Compiler with 5.02K GitHub stars and 923 GitHub forks.

Decisions about Closure Compiler and Webpack
Aleksandr Filatov
Contract Software Engineer - Microsoft · | 0 upvote · 72.8K views
Why migrated?

I could define the next points why we have to migrate:

  • Decrease build time of our application. (It was the main cause).
  • Also jspm install takes much more time than npm install.
  • Many config files for SystemJS and JSPM. For Webpack you can use just one main config file, and you can use some separate config files for specific builds using inheritance and merge them.
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We mostly use rollup to publish package onto NPM. For most all other use cases, we use the Meteor build tool (probably 99% of the time) for publishing packages. If you're using Node on FHIR you probably won't need to know rollup, unless you are somehow working on helping us publish front end user interface components using FHIR. That being said, we have been migrating away from Atmosphere package manager towards NPM. As we continue to migrate away, we may publish other NPM packages using rollup.

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Pros of Closure Compiler
Pros of Webpack
  • 1
    The best performing output
  • 1
    Small output size
  • 1
    Dead code elimination
  • 1
    ES6 support
  • 1
    Bundle support for CommonJS, ES6, .
  • 0
    Ease
  • 308
    Most powerful bundler
  • 182
    Built-in dev server with livereload
  • 143
    Can handle all types of assets
  • 87
    Easy configuration
  • 20
    Laravel-mix
  • 4
    Overengineered, Underdeveloped
  • 2
    Makes it easy to bundle static assets
  • 2
    Webpack-Encore
  • 1
    Better support in Browser Dev-Tools
  • 1
    Redundant

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Cons of Closure Compiler
Cons of Webpack
    Be the first to leave a con
    • 11
      Hard to configure
    • 2
      Spaghetti-Code out of the box
    • 2
      SystemJS integration is quite lackluster
    • 2
      Loader architecture is quite a mess (unreliable/buggy)
    • 2
      Fire and Forget mentality of Core-Developers
    • 2
      No clear direction

    Sign up to add or upvote consMake informed product decisions

    What is Closure Compiler?

    The Closure Compiler is a tool for making JavaScript download and run faster. It is a true compiler for JavaScript. Instead of compiling from a source language to machine code, it compiles from JavaScript to better JavaScript. It parses your JavaScript, analyzes it, removes dead code and rewrites and minimizes what's left. It also checks syntax, variable references, and types, and warns about common JavaScript pitfalls.

    What is Webpack?

    A bundler for javascript and friends. Packs many modules into a few bundled assets. Code Splitting allows to load parts for the application on demand. Through "loaders" modules can be CommonJs, AMD, ES6 modules, CSS, Images, JSON, Coffeescript, LESS, ... and your custom stuff.

    Need advice about which tool to choose?Ask the StackShare community!

    Jobs that mention Closure Compiler and Webpack as a desired skillset
    What companies use Closure Compiler?
    What companies use Webpack?
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    What tools integrate with Closure Compiler?
    What tools integrate with Webpack?

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    What are some alternatives to Closure Compiler and Webpack?
    Babel
    Babel will turn your ES6+ code into ES5 friendly code, so you can start using it right now without waiting for browser support.
    UglifyJS
    This package implements a general-purpose JavaScript parser/compressor/beautifier toolkit. It is developed on NodeJS, but it should work on any JavaScript platform supporting the CommonJS module system (and if your platform of choice doesn’t support CommonJS, you can easily implement it, or discard the exports.* lines from UglifyJS sources).
    TypeScript
    TypeScript is a language for application-scale JavaScript development. It's a typed superset of JavaScript that compiles to plain JavaScript.
    See all alternatives
    How developers use Closure Compiler and Webpack
    Volkan Özçelik uses
    Webpack

    Webpack is the best bundler. Period.

    Yes, it has a(n arguably) messy documentation, and a steep learning curve; but once you get the hang of it, there is nothing you cannot do with it.

    Use it and you don’t have to use any other bundler at all.

    It has a vivid ecosystem, and great plugin support.

    Alec Cunningham uses
    Webpack

    My preferred build tool; allows me to bundle my JSX, JS, CSS files for easy access and I can pass the bundle through my node server for server side rendering.

    Kent Steiner uses
    Webpack

    Flexible building and compiling of source for browser consumption, mainly for JS, but experimenting a little with CSS (although I prefer StylusJS for CSS).

    Andrew Gatenby uses
    Webpack

    We use this to optimise the delivery of the client-side for our revised Admin System, so it's able to be delivered to browsers as efficiently as possible.

    Cameron Drake uses
    Webpack

    Webpack compiles files to bundles with source maps. Using Webpack you can use the latest features (ES6) and have it compiled to compliant js.