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C++ vs HTML5: What are the differences?

C++: Has imperative, object-oriented and generic programming features, while also providing the facilities for low level memory manipulation. C++ compiles directly to a machine's native code, allowing it to be one of the fastest languages in the world, if optimized; HTML5: 5th major revision of the core language of the World Wide Web. HTML5 is a core technology markup language of the Internet used for structuring and presenting content for the World Wide Web. As of October 2014 this is the final and complete fifth revision of the HTML standard of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). The previous version, HTML 4, was standardised in 1997.

C++ and HTML5 can be categorized as "Languages" tools.

"Performance", "Control over memory allocation" and "Cross-platform" are the key factors why developers consider C++; whereas "New doctype", "Local storage" and "Canvas" are the primary reasons why HTML5 is favored.

9GAG, Asana, and Disqus are some of the popular companies that use HTML5, whereas C++ is used by Lyft, OkCupid, and Twitch. HTML5 has a broader approval, being mentioned in 3166 company stacks & 3482 developers stacks; compared to C++, which is listed in 199 company stacks and 371 developer stacks.

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What is C++?

C++ compiles directly to a machine's native code, allowing it to be one of the fastest languages in the world, if optimized.

What is HTML5?

HTML5 is a core technology markup language of the Internet used for structuring and presenting content for the World Wide Web. As of October 2014 this is the final and complete fifth revision of the HTML standard of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). The previous version, HTML 4, was standardised in 1997.
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    What are some alternatives to C++ and HTML5?
    C
    Python
    Python is a general purpose programming language created by Guido Van Rossum. Python is most praised for its elegant syntax and readable code, if you are just beginning your programming career python suits you best.
    PHP
    Fast, flexible and pragmatic, PHP powers everything from your blog to the most popular websites in the world.
    JavaScript
    JavaScript is most known as the scripting language for Web pages, but used in many non-browser environments as well such as node.js or Apache CouchDB. It is a prototype-based, multi-paradigm scripting language that is dynamic,and supports object-oriented, imperative, and functional programming styles.
    Java
    Java is a programming language and computing platform first released by Sun Microsystems in 1995. There are lots of applications and websites that will not work unless you have Java installed, and more are created every day. Java is fast, secure, and reliable. From laptops to datacenters, game consoles to scientific supercomputers, cell phones to the Internet, Java is everywhere!
    See all alternatives
    Decisions about C++ and HTML5
    Dima Korolev
    Dima Korolev
    Principal Maintainer at Current · | 3 upvotes · 19.6K views
    atFriendlyDataFriendlyData
    Ruby
    Ruby
    C++
    C++
    #BNF
    #NLP
    #Grammar

    Ruby NLP C++ Grammar #BNF

    At FriendlyData we had a Ruby-based pipeline for natural language processing. Our technology is centered around grammar-based natural language parsing, as well as various product features, and, as the core stack of the company historically is Ruby, the initial version of the pipeline was implemented in Ruby as well.

    As we were entering the exponential growth phase, both technology- and product-wise, we looked into how could we speed up and extend the performance and flexibility of our [meta-]BNF-based parsing engine. Gradually, we built the pieces of the engine in C++.

    Ultimately, the natural language parsing stack spans three universes and three software engineering paradigms: the declarative one, the functional one, and the imperative one. The imperative one was and remains implemented in Ruby, the functional one is implemented in a functional language (this part is under the NDA, while everything I am talking about here is part of the public talks we gave throughout 2017 and 2018), and the declarative part, which can loosely be thought of as being BNF-based, is now served by the C++ engine.

    The C++ engine for the BNF part removed the immediate blockers, gave us 500x+ performance speedup, and enabled us to launch new product features, most notably query completions, suggestions, and spelling corrections.

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    Conor Myhrvold
    Conor Myhrvold
    Tech Brand Mgr, Office of CTO at Uber · | 22 upvotes · 1.2M views
    atUber TechnologiesUber Technologies
    Jaeger
    Jaeger
    Python
    Python
    Java
    Java
    Node.js
    Node.js
    Go
    Go
    C++
    C++
    Kubernetes
    Kubernetes
    JavaScript
    JavaScript
    Red Hat OpenShift
    Red Hat OpenShift
    C#
    C#
    Apache Spark
    Apache Spark

    How Uber developed the open source, end-to-end distributed tracing Jaeger , now a CNCF project:

    Distributed tracing is quickly becoming a must-have component in the tools that organizations use to monitor their complex, microservice-based architectures. At Uber, our open source distributed tracing system Jaeger saw large-scale internal adoption throughout 2016, integrated into hundreds of microservices and now recording thousands of traces every second.

    Here is the story of how we got here, from investigating off-the-shelf solutions like Zipkin, to why we switched from pull to push architecture, and how distributed tracing will continue to evolve:

    https://eng.uber.com/distributed-tracing/

    (GitHub Pages : https://www.jaegertracing.io/, GitHub: https://github.com/jaegertracing/jaeger)

    Bindings/Operator: Python Java Node.js Go C++ Kubernetes JavaScript OpenShift C# Apache Spark

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    Jonathan Pugh
    Jonathan Pugh
    Software Engineer / Project Manager / Technical Architect · | 21 upvotes · 729.6K views
    Framework7
    Framework7
    JavaScript
    JavaScript
    TypeScript
    TypeScript
    Figma
    Figma
    Visual Studio Code
    Visual Studio Code
    Webpack
    Webpack
    Babel
    Babel
    Ruby
    Ruby
    HTML5
    HTML5
    CouchDB
    CouchDB
    Pouchdb
    Pouchdb
    Font Awesome
    Font Awesome
    Apache Cordova
    Apache Cordova
    CSS 3
    CSS 3
    PhoneGap
    PhoneGap
    #Sass
    #HTML5
    #SCSS
    #Sketch
    #Css
    #GraphQL
    #CSS3
    #Less
    #Electron
    #HandleBars
    #Template7
    #GraphCool

    I needed to choose a full stack of tools for cross platform mobile application design & development. After much research and trying different tools, these are what I came up with that work for me today:

    For the client coding I chose Framework7 because of its performance, easy learning curve, and very well designed, beautiful UI widgets. I think it's perfect for solo development or small teams. I didn't like React Native. It felt heavy to me and rigid. Framework7 allows the use of #CSS3, which I think is the best technology to come out of the #WWW movement. No other tech has been able to allow designers and developers to develop such flexible, high performance, customisable user interface elements that are highly responsive and hardware accelerated before. Now #CSS3 includes variables and flexboxes it is truly a powerful language and there is no longer a need for preprocessors such as #SCSS / #Sass / #less. React Native contains a very limited interpretation of #CSS3 which I found very frustrating after using #CSS3 for some years already and knowing its powerful features. The other very nice feature of Framework7 is that you can even build for the browser if you want your app to be available for desktop web browsers. The latest release also includes the ability to build for #Electron so you can have MacOS, Windows and Linux desktop apps. This is not possible with React Native yet.

    Framework7 runs on top of Apache Cordova. Cordova and webviews have been slated as being slow in the past. Having a game developer background I found the tweeks to make it run as smooth as silk. One of those tweeks is to use WKWebView. Another important one was using srcset on images.

    I use #Template7 for the for the templating system which is a no-nonsense mobile-centric #HandleBars style extensible templating system. It's easy to write custom helpers for, is fast and has a small footprint. I'm not forced into a new paradigm or learning some new syntax. It operates with standard JavaScript, HTML5 and CSS 3. It's written by the developer of Framework7 and so dovetails with it as expected.

    I configured TypeScript to work with the latest version of Framework7. I consider TypeScript to be one of the best creations to come out of Microsoft in some time. They must have an amazing team working on it. It's very powerful and flexible. It helps you catch a lot of bugs and also provides code completion in supporting IDEs. So for my IDE I use Visual Studio Code which is a blazingly fast and silky smooth editor that integrates seamlessly with TypeScript for the ultimate type checking setup (both products are produced by Microsoft).

    I use Webpack and Babel to compile the JavaScript. TypeScript can compile to JavaScript directly but Babel offers a few more options and polyfills so you can use the latest (and even prerelease) JavaScript features today and compile to be backwards compatible with virtually any browser. My favorite recent addition is "optional chaining" which greatly simplifies and increases readability of a number of sections of my code dealing with getting and setting data in nested objects.

    I use some Ruby scripts to process images with ImageMagick and pngquant to optimise for size and even auto insert responsive image code into the HTML5. Ruby is the ultimate cross platform scripting language. Even as your scripts become large, Ruby allows you to refactor your code easily and make it Object Oriented if necessary. I find it the quickest and easiest way to maintain certain aspects of my build process.

    For the user interface design and prototyping I use Figma. Figma has an almost identical user interface to #Sketch but has the added advantage of being cross platform (MacOS and Windows). Its real-time collaboration features are outstanding and I use them a often as I work mostly on remote projects. Clients can collaborate in real-time and see changes I make as I make them. The clickable prototyping features in Figma are also very well designed and mean I can send clickable prototypes to clients to try user interface updates as they are made and get immediate feedback. I'm currently also evaluating the latest version of #AdobeXD as an alternative to Figma as it has the very cool auto-animate feature. It doesn't have real-time collaboration yet, but I heard it is proposed for 2019.

    For the UI icons I use Font Awesome Pro. They have the largest selection and best looking icons you can find on the internet with several variations in styles so you can find most of the icons you want for standard projects.

    For the backend I was using the #GraphCool Framework. As I later found out, #GraphQL still has some way to go in order to provide the full power of a mature graph query language so later in my project I ripped out #GraphCool and replaced it with CouchDB and Pouchdb. Primarily so I could provide good offline app support. CouchDB with Pouchdb is very flexible and efficient combination and overcomes some of the restrictions I found in #GraphQL and hence #GraphCool also. The most impressive and important feature of CouchDB is its replication. You can configure it in various ways for backups, fault tolerance, caching or conditional merging of databases. CouchDB and Pouchdb even supports storing, retrieving and serving binary or image data or other mime types. This removes a level of complexity usually present in database implementations where binary or image data is usually referenced through an #HTML5 link. With CouchDB and Pouchdb apps can operate offline and sync later, very efficiently, when the network connection is good.

    I use PhoneGap when testing the app. It auto-reloads your app when its code is changed and you can also install it on Android phones to preview your app instantly. iOS is a bit more tricky cause of Apple's policies so it's not available on the App Store, but you can build it and install it yourself to your device.

    So that's my latest mobile stack. What tools do you use? Have you tried these ones?

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    Martin Lonkwitz
    Martin Lonkwitz
    Software engineering at SVA · | 3 upvotes · 21.1K views
    C++
    C++
    Java
    Java

    Maybe not in everybody focus but I do like programming for @z/OS, @z/Linux and @z/VM with C++ , Java and Assembler . Who else love to dig into control blocks and get a deep dive into system resources to run things in a high valuable way ? And also go all the way up to the application to enlight all the infrastructure features to it ?

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    Jeyabalaji Subramanian
    Jeyabalaji Subramanian
    CTO at FundsCorner · | 21 upvotes · 196.1K views
    atFundsCornerFundsCorner
    JavaScript
    JavaScript
    HTML5
    HTML5
    Vue.js
    Vue.js
    Vuetify
    Vuetify
    Amazon Cognito
    Amazon Cognito

    At FundsCorner, when we set out to pick up the front-end tech stack (around Dec 2017), we drove our decision based on the following considerations:

    (1) We were clear that we will NOT have a hybrid app. We will start with Responsive Web & once there is traction, we will rollout our Android App. However, we wanted to ensure that the users have a consistent experience on both the Web & the App. So, the front-end framework must also have a material design component library which we can choose from.

    (2) Before joining FundsCorner as a CTO, I had already worked with Angular. I enjoyed working with Angular, but I felt that I must choose something that will provide us with the fastest time from Concept to Reality.

    (3) I am strong proponent of segregating HTML & JavaScript. I.e. I was not for writing or generating HTML through JavaScript. Because, this will mean that the Front-end developers I have to hire will always be very strong on JavaScript alongside HTML5 & CSS. I was looking for a Framework that was on JavaScript but not HEAVY on JavaScript.

    (3) The first iteration of the web app was to be done by myself. But I was clear that when someone takes up the mantle, they will be able to come up the curve fast.

    In the end, Vue.js and Vuetify satisfied all the above criteria with aplomb! When I did our first POC on Vue.js I could not believe that front-end development could be this fast. The documentation was par excellence and all the required essentials that come along with the Framework (viz. Routing, Store, Validations) etc. were available from the same community! It was also a breeze to integrate with other JavaScript libraries (such as Amazon Cognito).

    By picking Vuetify, we were able to provide a consistent UI experience between our Web App and Native App, besides making the UI development ultra blazing fast!

    In the end, we were able to rollout our Web App in record 6 weeks (that included the end to end Loan Origination flow, Loans management system & Customer engagement module). www.jeyabalaji.com

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    C++
    C++
    Rust
    Rust

    Initially, I wrote my text adventure game in C++, but I later rewrote my project in Rust. It was an incredibly easier process to use Rust to create a faster, more robust, and bug-free project.

    One difficulty with the C++ language is the lack of safety, helpful error messages, and useful abstractions when compared to languages like Rust. Rust would display a helpful error message at compile time, while C++ would often display "Segmentation fault (core dumped)" or wall of STL errors in the middle. While I would frequently push buggy code to my C++ repository, Rust enabled me to only even submit fully functional code.

    Along with the actual language, Rust also included useful tools such as rustup and cargo to aid in building projects, IDE tooling, managing dependencies, and cross-compiling. This was a refreshing alternative to the difficult CMake and tools of the same nature.

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    Omid Farhang
    Omid Farhang
    Sr. Full Stack Developer · | 11 upvotes · 93.3K views
    HTML5
    HTML5
    Bootstrap
    Bootstrap
    gulp
    gulp
    GitHub Pages
    GitHub Pages
    GitHub
    GitHub
    JavaScript
    JavaScript
    Google Analytics
    Google Analytics

    Developing static sites like a landing page for mobile app or just a personal resume using HTML5 and Bootstrap is a lot fun when you are using build tools like gulp . I made a personal resume using above tools and published them on GitHub Pages. It was fast and easy, Thanks to GitHub for the free service. All the JavaScript codes worked perfectly after being concat and minified and uglified by gulp and running perfectly on GitHub Pages. gulp created sitemap and inserted Google Analytics code into all pages and saved about 30% of images size by compressing them during build.

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    Epistol
    Epistol
    Laravel
    Laravel
    PhpStorm
    PhpStorm
    Google Analytics
    Google Analytics
    Sass
    Sass
    HTML5
    HTML5
    JavaScript
    JavaScript
    Vue.js
    Vue.js
    Webpack
    Webpack
    Buddy
    Buddy
    nginx
    nginx
    Ubuntu
    Ubuntu
    GitHub
    GitHub
    Git
    Git
    Deployer
    Deployer
    CloudFlare
    CloudFlare