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ES6 vs JavaScript: What are the differences?

What is ES6? The next version of JavaScript. Goals for ECMAScript 2015 include providing better support for large applications, library creation, and for use of ECMAScript as a compilation target for other languages. Some of its major enhancements include modules, class declarations, lexical block scoping, iterators and generators, promises for asynchronous programming, destructuring patterns, and proper tail calls.

What is JavaScript? Lightweight, interpreted, object-oriented language with first-class functions. JavaScript is most known as the scripting language for Web pages, but used in many non-browser environments as well such as node.js or Apache CouchDB. It is a prototype-based, multi-paradigm scripting language that is dynamic,and supports object-oriented, imperative, and functional programming styles.

ES6 and JavaScript belong to "Languages" category of the tech stack.

"ES6 code is shorter than traditional JS" is the top reason why over 98 developers like ES6, while over 1556 developers mention "Can be used on frontend/backend" as the leading cause for choosing JavaScript.

According to the StackShare community, JavaScript has a broader approval, being mentioned in 5080 company stacks & 6472 developers stacks; compared to ES6, which is listed in 1461 company stacks and 1725 developer stacks.

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What is ES6?

Goals for ECMAScript 2015 include providing better support for large applications, library creation, and for use of ECMAScript as a compilation target for other languages. Some of its major enhancements include modules, class declarations, lexical block scoping, iterators and generators, promises for asynchronous programming, destructuring patterns, and proper tail calls.

What is JavaScript?

JavaScript is most known as the scripting language for Web pages, but used in many non-browser environments as well such as node.js or Apache CouchDB. It is a prototype-based, multi-paradigm scripting language that is dynamic,and supports object-oriented, imperative, and functional programming styles.
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    What are some alternatives to ES6 and JavaScript?
    CoffeeScript
    It adds syntactic sugar inspired by Ruby, Python and Haskell in an effort to enhance JavaScript's brevity and readability. Specific additional features include list comprehension and de-structuring assignment.
    TypeScript
    TypeScript is a language for application-scale JavaScript development. It's a typed superset of JavaScript that compiles to plain JavaScript.
    jQuery
    jQuery is a cross-platform JavaScript library designed to simplify the client-side scripting of HTML.
    PHP
    Fast, flexible and pragmatic, PHP powers everything from your blog to the most popular websites in the world.
    Python
    Python is a general purpose programming language created by Guido Van Rossum. Python is most praised for its elegant syntax and readable code, if you are just beginning your programming career python suits you best.
    See all alternatives
    Decisions about ES6 and JavaScript
    Nick Parsons
    Nick Parsons
    Director of Developer Marketing at Stream · | 34 upvotes · 539.1K views
    atStreamStream
    Stream
    Stream
    Go
    Go
    JavaScript
    JavaScript
    ES6
    ES6
    Node.js
    Node.js
    Babel
    Babel
    Yarn
    Yarn
    Python
    Python
    #FrameworksFullStack
    #Languages

    Winds 2.0 is an open source Podcast/RSS reader developed by Stream with a core goal to enable a wide range of developers to contribute.

    We chose JavaScript because nearly every developer knows or can, at the very least, read JavaScript. With ES6 and Node.js v10.x.x, it’s become a very capable language. Async/Await is powerful and easy to use (Async/Await vs Promises). Babel allows us to experiment with next-generation JavaScript (features that are not in the official JavaScript spec yet). Yarn allows us to consistently install packages quickly (and is filled with tons of new tricks)

    We’re using JavaScript for everything – both front and backend. Most of our team is experienced with Go and Python, so Node was not an obvious choice for this app.

    Sure... there will be haters who refuse to acknowledge that there is anything remotely positive about JavaScript (there are even rants on Hacker News about Node.js); however, without writing completely in JavaScript, we would not have seen the results we did.

    #FrameworksFullStack #Languages

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    Jake Stein
    Jake Stein
    CEO at Stitch · | 15 upvotes · 151.7K views
    atStitchStitch
    AngularJS
    AngularJS
    React
    React
    CoffeeScript
    CoffeeScript
    JavaScript
    JavaScript
    ES6
    ES6

    Stitch’s frontend is used to configure data sources and destinations and monitor the status of each. Although we have been using AngularJS since its early days, we recently introduced React components into our front end, which many of our developers find easier to work with. We started using CoffeeScript when it was one of the few options for a more expressive alternative to vanilla JavaScript, but today we opt to instead write new code in ES6, which we feel is a more mature alternative.

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    Sparker73
    Sparker73
    Frontend Developer · | 7 upvotes · 23.2K views
    Node.js
    Node.js
    JavaScript
    JavaScript
    .NET
    .NET
    PHP
    PHP

    Node.js is my choice because it uses very few resources to run and it is capable to handle tons of connections simultaneously. Most developers already know JavaScript, the evolution of ECMAScript is immediately reflected to Node.js and all you have to do is update your Server's Node.js version without time and effort. Thousands of improvements that makes it very powerful especially in asynchronous programming. The web is full of courses, dev communities, free sample code, plunkers and many knowledge sources on Node.js that facilitates the learning curve. What else we can ask from a legendary language that is still evolving? I am learning Node.js by developing a simple REST WebAPI and using it as a playground to test situations in which the main objective is to challenge Node.js and compare results and performance with .NET implementations and certain well known fast PHP implementations. Until now the results are astonishing. Summarizing: Node.js for backend is so far (in my opinion) the most recommended solution to get positive achievements in size, speed, power, concurrency, scalability, deployment and running costs.

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    Zach Holman
    Zach Holman
    React
    React
    Apollo
    Apollo
    Rails
    Rails
    JavaScript
    JavaScript

    Oof. I have truly hated JavaScript for a long time. Like, for over twenty years now. Like, since the Clinton administration. It's always been a nightmare to deal with all of the aspects of that silly language.

    But wowza, things have changed. Tooling is just way, way better. I'm primarily web-oriented, and using React and Apollo together the past few years really opened my eyes to building rich apps. And I deeply apologize for using the phrase rich apps; I don't think I've ever said such Enterprisey words before.

    But yeah, things are different now. I still love Rails, and still use it for a lot of apps I build. But it's that silly rich apps phrase that's the problem. Users have way more comprehensive expectations than they did even five years ago, and the JS community does a good job at building tools and tech that tackle the problems of making heavy, complicated UI and frontend work.

    Obviously there's a lot of things happening here, so just saying "JavaScript isn't terrible" might encompass a huge amount of libraries and frameworks. But if you're like me, yeah, give things another shot- I'm somehow not hating on JavaScript anymore and... gulp... I kinda love it.

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    Antonio Kobashikawa
    Antonio Kobashikawa
    Web developer | Blogger | Freelancer at Rulo Kobashikawa · | 6 upvotes · 89.5K views
    Node.js
    Node.js
    ExpressJS
    ExpressJS
    MongoDB
    MongoDB
    Vue.js
    Vue.js
    Ionic
    Ionic
    JavaScript
    JavaScript
    ES6
    ES6
    Koa
    Koa

    We are using Node.js and ExpressJS to build a REST services that is middleware of a legacy system. MongoDB as database. Vue.js helps us to make rapid UI to test use cases. Frontend is build for mobile with Ionic . We like using JavaScript and ES6 .

    I think next step could be to use Koa but I am not sure.

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    Johnny Bell
    Johnny Bell
    Senior Software Engineer at StackShare · | 9 upvotes · 142.7K views
    atStackShareStackShare
    jQuery
    jQuery
    React
    React
    ES6
    ES6
    JavaScript
    JavaScript
    MobX
    MobX
    GraphQL
    GraphQL
    Apollo
    Apollo
    #Hooks🎣
    #Context

    We are always building new features and replacing old code at StackShare. Lately we have been building out new features for the frontend, and removing a lot of old jQuery code (sorry jQuery but it's time to go).

    We've mainly been using React, ES6 and JavaScript on the frontend to build out the components, and we've been slowly removing some legacy MobX and using GraphQL and Apollo for our state management, if we need to control state further than GraphQL and Apollo allows us to we use just plain React with #context , or the new fancy React #hooks🎣 .

    As we've moved towards the above tech, its really made smashing out new features and updating legacy code super fast, and really fun!

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    Hampton Catlin
    Hampton Catlin
    VP of Engineering at Rent The Runway · | 10 upvotes · 116.1K views
    atRent the RunwayRent the Runway
    JavaScript
    JavaScript
    ES6
    ES6
    TypeScript
    TypeScript
    React
    React

    We use JavaScript because it's the standard for web development, especially with browser execution. And, over the years, some smart work by the W3C has taken Javascript from the most-hated-language to the okay-I-can-make-that-good. No small feat!

    Obviously, using ES6 and TypeScript is what makes it decent in browser contexts. Throw in a bit of React and now we're cooking with gas!

    See more
    React
    React
    Redux
    Redux
    FeathersJS
    FeathersJS
    HTML5
    HTML5
    JavaScript
    JavaScript
    MongoDB
    MongoDB
    Redis
    Redis
    Socket.IO
    Socket.IO
    ES6
    ES6

    I have always been interested in building a real-time multiplayer game engine that could be massively scalable, and recently I decided to start working on a MMO version of the classic "snake" game. I wanted the entire #Stack to be based on ES6 JavaScript so for the #Backend I chose to use FeathersJS with MongoDB for game/user data storage, Redis for distributed mutex and pub/sub, and Socket.IO for real-time communication. For the #Frontend I used React with Redux.js, the FeathersJS client as well as HTML5 canvas to render the view.

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    Tom Klein
    Tom Klein
    CEO at Gentlent · | 4 upvotes · 42.8K views
    atGentlentGentlent
    JavaScript
    JavaScript
    Node.js
    Node.js
    PHP
    PHP
    HTML5
    HTML5
    Sass
    Sass
    nginx
    nginx
    React
    React
    PostgreSQL
    PostgreSQL
    Ubuntu
    Ubuntu
    ES6
    ES6
    TypeScript
    TypeScript
    Google Compute Engine
    Google Compute Engine
    Socket.IO
    Socket.IO
    Electron
    Electron
    Python
    Python

    Our most used programming languages are JavaScript / Node.js for it's lightweight and fast use, PHP because everyone knows it, HTML5 because you can't live without it and Sass to write great CSS. Occasionally, we use nginx as a web server and proxy, React for our UX, PostgreSQL as fast relational database, Ubuntu as server OS, ES6 and TypeScript for Node, Google Compute Engine for our infrastructure, and Socket.IO and Electron for specific use cases. We also use Python for some of our backends.

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    Osamah Aldoaiss
    Osamah Aldoaiss
    UI Engineer | Maker at Triad Apparel Inc. · | 6 upvotes · 22.8K views
    atTriad Apparel Inc.Triad Apparel Inc.
    Gatsby
    Gatsby
    Lighthouse
    Lighthouse
    React
    React
    GraphQL
    GraphQL
    Node.js
    Node.js
    ES6
    ES6
    JavaScript
    JavaScript

    Gatsby has been at the core of our Shop system since day one. It gives its User the power to create fast and performant sites out-of-the-box. You barely have to do anything to get great Lighthouse results. And it all runs on ES6 JavaScript.

    The power of SSR React and then hydrating it client-side to add interactivity and App-like feel is what makes Gatsby powerful.

    It comes with a ton of plugins, that are mind-boggling: Image Processing, GraphQL, Node.js, and so much more. This is thanks to a great ecosystem, a great user-base and the revolutionary Community work, which led to the Gatsby repo to be one of the most committed to, out there.

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    Pedro Arnal Puente
    Pedro Arnal Puente
    CTO at La Cupula Music SL · | 8 upvotes · 22.3K views
    atLa Cupula Music SLLa Cupula Music SL
    JavaScript
    JavaScript
    jQuery
    jQuery
    jQuery UI
    jQuery UI
    Vue.js
    Vue.js
    Webpack
    Webpack
    ESLint
    ESLint
    Babel
    Babel
    ES6
    ES6

    We are phasing out jQuery and jQuery UI in favour or Vue.js and @Vue-cli so we can support building a modern, well-architectured frontend.

    The JavaScript build pipeline is supported by Webpack , and includes tools like ESLint and Babel , so we can properly support the latest ES/JS versions, with ES6 as the minimum baseline.

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    Ali Soueidan
    Ali Soueidan
    Creative Web Developer at Ali Soueidan · | 17 upvotes · 303K views
    npm
    npm
    Vue.js
    Vue.js
    vuex
    vuex
    JavaScript
    JavaScript
    Pug
    Pug
    Sass
    Sass
    JSON
    JSON
    Git
    Git
    GitHub
    GitHub
    ES6
    ES6
    Asana
    Asana
    Adobe Illustrator
    Adobe Illustrator
    PHP
    PHP
    Babel
    Babel

    Application and Data: Since my personal website ( https://alisoueidan.com ) is a SPA I've chosen to use Vue.js, as a framework to create it. After a short skeptical phase I immediately felt in love with the single file component concept! I also used vuex for state management, which makes working with several components, which are communicating with each other even more fun and convenient to use. Of course, using Vue requires using JavaScript as well, since it is the basis of it.

    For markup and style, I used Pug and Sass, since they’re the perfect match to me. I love the clean and strict syntax of both of them and even more that their structure is almost similar. Also, both of them come with an expanded functionality such as mixins, loops and so on related to their “siblings” (HTML and CSS). Both of them require nesting and prevent untidy code, which can be a huge advantage when working in teams. I used JSON to store data (since the data quantity on my website is moderate) – JSON works also good in combo with Pug, using for loops, based on the JSON Objects for example.

    To send my contact form I used PHP, since sending emails using PHP is still relatively convenient, simple and easy done.

    DevOps: Of course, I used Git to do my version management (which I even do in smaller projects like my website just have an additional backup of my code). On top of that I used GitHub since it now supports private repository for free accounts (which I am using for my own). I use Babel to use ES6 functionality such as arrow functions and so on, and still don’t losing cross browser compatibility.

    Side note: I used npm for package management. 🎉

    *Business Tools: * I use Asana to organize my project. This is a big advantage to me, even if I work alone, since “private” projects can get interrupted for some time. By using Asana I still know (even after month of not touching a project) what I’ve done, on which task I was at last working on and what still is to do. Working in Teams (for enterprise I’d take on Jira instead) of course Asana is a Tool which I really love to use as well. All the graphics on my website are SVG which I have created with Adobe Illustrator and adjusted within the SVG code or by using JavaScript or CSS (SASS).

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    Siddhant Sharma
    Siddhant Sharma
    Tech Connoisseur at Bigstep Technologies · | 4 upvotes · 11.1K views
    WordPress
    WordPress
    Java
    Java
    JavaScript
    JavaScript
    Android SDK
    Android SDK
    Magneto
    Magneto
    Android OS
    Android OS
    Google Analytics
    Google Analytics
    PHP
    PHP
    FileZilla
    FileZilla
    #Onlinecommunity
    #Chatsdk

    WordPress Java JavaScript Android SDK Magneto Android OS Google Analytics PHP FileZilla

    Since the evolution of the Internet, online communities and forums are playing a major p part in information sharing. I signed up for a similar community back in 2008 namely Orkut. We used to share scraps all day. At that time, the only communication we have was through either Orkut or text messaging.

    Nobody wanted to share their number with us. and we were not getting any scraps from random girls as we imagined. Even though the popularity of Orkut increased subsequently. However, there was nothing like real-time messaging available in any of the websites. Then comes Facebook.

    Facebook's entrance in the market was big. but WHY?

    Facebook managed to provide everything Orkut had. And to Top it off, A real Time Messaging Platform "messenger" as we know it today. that was the doom of Orkut.

    There are many online communities for Sports, LGBTQ Community, Gaming Community and many more. Communities can see a major downfall if they didn't accept the change. They need to integrate the messaging application into their websites or application. That's what we do at Channelize.io. Have a look and decide for yourself.

    Be it a large enterprise or a startup business, you need real-time messaging. we can help you with that.

    Channelize.io #wordpress #onlinecommunity #Chatsdk #Chatapi #business
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    Kamil Kowalski
    Kamil Kowalski
    Engineering Manager at Fresha · | 26 upvotes · 135.5K views
    atFresha EngineeringFresha Engineering
    Cypress
    Cypress
    JavaScript
    JavaScript
    Elixir
    Elixir
    Ruby
    Ruby
    Java
    Java
    Selenium
    Selenium

    When you think about test automation, it’s crucial to make it everyone’s responsibility (not just QA Engineers'). We started with Selenium and Java, but with our platform revolving around Ruby, Elixir and JavaScript, QA Engineers were left alone to automate tests. Cypress was the answer, as we could switch to JS and simply involve more people from day one. There's a downside too, as it meant testing on Chrome only, but that was "good enough" for us + if really needed we can always cover some specific cases in a different way.

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    Bryam Rodriguez
    Bryam Rodriguez
    JavaScript
    JavaScript
    Bit
    Bit
    Python
    Python
    Next.js
    Next.js
    React Native
    React Native
    Redis
    Redis
    MongoDB
    MongoDB
    PostgreSQL
    PostgreSQL
    RSpec
    RSpec
    react-testing-library
    react-testing-library
    Jest
    Jest
    Create React App
    Create React App
    Redux
    Redux
    React
    React
    Rails
    Rails
    Ruby
    Ruby

    I'm working as one of the engineering leads in RunaHR. As our platform is a Saas, we thought It'd be good to have an API (We chose Ruby and Rails for this) and a SPA (built with React and Redux ) connected. We started the SPA with Create React App since It's pretty easy to start.

    We use Jest as the testing framework and react-testing-library to test React components. In Rails we make tests using RSpec.

    Our main database is PostgreSQL, but we also use MongoDB to store some type of data. We started to use Redis  for cache and other time sensitive operations.

    We have a couple of extra projects: One is an Employee app built with React Native and the other is an internal back office dashboard built with Next.js for the client and Python in the backend side.

    Since we have different frontend apps we have found useful to have Bit to document visual components and utils in JavaScript.

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    Interest over time
    Reviews of ES6 and JavaScript
    Review ofJavaScriptJavaScript

    excellent!!

    How developers use ES6 and JavaScript
    Avatar of Andrew Faulkner
    Andrew Faulkner uses JavaScriptJavaScript

    Almost the entire app was written in Javascript, with JSON-based configuration and data storage. The following components were written and/or configured with Javascript:

    • Most server-side scripts, all unit tests, all build tools, etc. were driven by NodeJS.
    • ExpressJS served as the 'backend' server framework.
    • MongoDB (which stores essential JSON) was the main database.
    • MongooseJS was used as the main ORM for communicating with the database, with KnexJS used for certain edge cases.
    • MochaJS, ChaiJS, and ExpectJS were used for unit testing.
    • Frontend builds were done with Gulp and Webpack.
    • Package management was done primarily with npm - with a few exceptions that required the use of Bower (also configured with JSON).
    • "Templating" was done with Javascript dialect JSX.
    • The frontend was build primarily with ReactJS (as the View) and Redux (as the Controller / Store / frontend model).
    • Configuration was done with json files.

    The only notable exceptions were the use of SCSS (augmented by Compass) for styling, Bash for a few basic 'system chores' and CLI utilities required for development of the app (most notably git and heroku's CLI interface), and a bit of custom SQL for locations where the ORM extractions leaked (the app is DB-agnostic, but a bit of SQL was required to fill gaps in the ORMs when interfacing with Postgres).

    Avatar of OutSystems
    OutSystems uses JavaScriptJavaScript

    Read more on how to extend the OutSystems UI with Javascript here.

    OutSystems provides a very simple to use AJAX mechanism. However, developers can also use JavaScript extensively to customize how users interact with their applications, to create client side custom validations and dynamic behaviors, or even to create custom, very specific, AJAX interactions. For example, each application can have an application-wide defined JavaScript file or set of files included in resources. Page-specific JavaScript can also be defined.

    Avatar of Gorka Llona
    Gorka Llona uses JavaScriptJavaScript

    This GNU/GPL licensed Javascript library allows you to draw complex organizational charts that can't be drawn using Google's tool or equivalents. Orgchart structures are specified with JSON and can be generated on-the-fly by server-side scripts and databases. Events can be attached to clicks over the boxes. Multiple options can be defined; look at the repo for examples. This 1300-code-lines software component with contributors from 8 countries (and others for which I have to integrate their works) appears in the first page of Google Search results when searching for "Javascript Organizational Chart Library".

    Avatar of Cloudcraft
    Cloudcraft uses JavaScriptJavaScript

    JavaScript gets a bad rep, quite undeservedly so in my opinion. Today, JS is closer to functional languages than to the traditional-OO languages, and when used as such provides a great development experience. The pace of development is just picking up with transpilers like Babel making future advanced language features available to the masses today. At Cloudcraft.co, we write 100% of both the front-end (with React) and the backend (with Node.js) in Javascript, using the latest ES6 and even some ES7 features. This is not your grandfather's Javascript!

    Avatar of MOKA Analytics
    MOKA Analytics uses JavaScriptJavaScript

    The application front-end is written in JavaScript (ES6). We originally selected it over TypeScript because many library typings at the time were still flaky and the transpilation time was slow.

    We are now re-considering TypeScript because 1) the tooling has improved significantly, and 2) and the root cause of the majority of our front-end bugs are related to typing (despite having PropTypes).

    Avatar of Kurzor, s.r.o.
    Kurzor, s.r.o. uses ES6ES6

    We started using CoffeeScript years ago, so the switch to ES6 is quite natural in our team. ES6 of course advances the JS standard to a level of an advanced language. We are using it today simply because it: 1. helps to keep the code shorter, 2. integrates easily with JSX, 3. helps to deal with immutable using const.

    Avatar of Jake Taylor
    Jake Taylor uses ES6ES6

    ES6 is a new-ish, modern form of JavaScript that adds in extra functionality that make code cleaner and easier to work with, such as arrow functions, const and let declarations, array helper methods, object/array destructuring etc.

    Avatar of Ryan VanBelkum
    Ryan VanBelkum uses ES6ES6

    ES6 (ES2015) is a huge improvement to the javascript spec. These additions are heavily leveraged in React development, such as spread operators, fat arrow functions, and classes.

    Avatar of Ataccama
    Ataccama uses ES6ES6

    ES6 brings some sweet features to the language. Our favourites are lambda-expressions, block-scoped consts and lets and Promises.

    Avatar of Mick Dekkers
    Mick Dekkers uses ES6ES6

    ES6/ES2015+ makes JavaScript a pleasure to write. Arrow functions, template literals and ES modules especially. RIP CoffeeScript.

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