Groovy vs JavaScript vs PHP

Get Advice Icon

Need advice about which tool to choose?Ask the StackShare community!

Groovy
Groovy

804
416
+ 1
180
JavaScript
JavaScript

65.4K
51.5K
+ 1
7.4K
PHP
PHP

64.9K
20.2K
+ 1
4.3K
- No public GitHub repository available -

What is Groovy?

Groovy builds upon the strengths of Java but has additional power features inspired by languages like Python, Ruby and Smalltalk. It makes modern programming features available to Java developers with almost-zero learning curve.

What is JavaScript?

JavaScript is most known as the scripting language for Web pages, but used in many non-browser environments as well such as node.js or Apache CouchDB. It is a prototype-based, multi-paradigm scripting language that is dynamic,and supports object-oriented, imperative, and functional programming styles.

What is PHP?

Fast, flexible and pragmatic, PHP powers everything from your blog to the most popular websites in the world.
Get Advice Icon

Need advice about which tool to choose?Ask the StackShare community!

Why do developers choose Groovy?
Why do developers choose JavaScript?
Why do developers choose PHP?

Sign up to add, upvote and see more prosMake informed product decisions

Sign up to add, upvote and see more consMake informed product decisions

What companies use Groovy?
What companies use JavaScript?
What companies use PHP?

Sign up to get full access to all the companiesMake informed product decisions

What tools integrate with Groovy?
What tools integrate with JavaScript?
What tools integrate with PHP?

Sign up to get full access to all the tool integrationsMake informed product decisions

What are some alternatives to Groovy, JavaScript, and PHP?
Java
Java is a programming language and computing platform first released by Sun Microsystems in 1995. There are lots of applications and websites that will not work unless you have Java installed, and more are created every day. Java is fast, secure, and reliable. From laptops to datacenters, game consoles to scientific supercomputers, cell phones to the Internet, Java is everywhere!
Scala
Scala is an acronym for “Scalable Language”. This means that Scala grows with you. You can play with it by typing one-line expressions and observing the results. But you can also rely on it for large mission critical systems, as many companies, including Twitter, LinkedIn, or Intel do. To some, Scala feels like a scripting language. Its syntax is concise and low ceremony; its types get out of the way because the compiler can infer them.
Kotlin
Kotlin is a statically typed programming language for the JVM, Android and the browser, 100% interoperable with Java
Python
Python is a general purpose programming language created by Guido Van Rossum. Python is most praised for its elegant syntax and readable code, if you are just beginning your programming career python suits you best.
Gradle
Gradle is a build tool with a focus on build automation and support for multi-language development. If you are building, testing, publishing, and deploying software on any platform, Gradle offers a flexible model that can support the entire development lifecycle from compiling and packaging code to publishing web sites.
See all alternatives
Decisions about Groovy, JavaScript, and PHP
Sparker73
Sparker73
Frontend Developer · | 7 upvotes · 23.2K views
Node.js
Node.js
JavaScript
JavaScript
.NET
.NET
PHP
PHP

Node.js is my choice because it uses very few resources to run and it is capable to handle tons of connections simultaneously. Most developers already know JavaScript, the evolution of ECMAScript is immediately reflected to Node.js and all you have to do is update your Server's Node.js version without time and effort. Thousands of improvements that makes it very powerful especially in asynchronous programming. The web is full of courses, dev communities, free sample code, plunkers and many knowledge sources on Node.js that facilitates the learning curve. What else we can ask from a legendary language that is still evolving? I am learning Node.js by developing a simple REST WebAPI and using it as a playground to test situations in which the main objective is to challenge Node.js and compare results and performance with .NET implementations and certain well known fast PHP implementations. Until now the results are astonishing. Summarizing: Node.js for backend is so far (in my opinion) the most recommended solution to get positive achievements in size, speed, power, concurrency, scalability, deployment and running costs.

See more
Antonio Sanchez
Antonio Sanchez
CEO at Kokoen GmbH · | 13 upvotes · 217.2K views
atKokoen GmbHKokoen GmbH
PHP
PHP
Laravel
Laravel
MySQL
MySQL
Go
Go
MongoDB
MongoDB
JavaScript
JavaScript
Node.js
Node.js
ExpressJS
ExpressJS

Back at the start of 2017, we decided to create a web-based tool for the SEO OnPage analysis of our clients' websites. We had over 2.000 websites to analyze, so we had to perform thousands of requests to get every single page from those websites, process the information and save the big amounts of data somewhere.

Very soon we realized that the initial chosen script language and database, PHP, Laravel and MySQL, was not going to be able to cope efficiently with such a task.

By that time, we were doing some experiments for other projects with a language we had recently get to know, Go , so we decided to get a try and code the crawler using it. It was fantastic, we could process much more data with way less CPU power and in less time. By using the concurrency abilites that the language has to offers, we could also do more Http requests in less time.

Unfortunately, I have no comparison numbers to show about the performance differences between Go and PHP since the difference was so clear from the beginning and that we didn't feel the need to do further comparison tests nor document it. We just switched fully to Go.

There was still a problem: despite the big amount of Data we were generating, MySQL was performing very well, but as we were adding more and more features to the software and with those features more and more different type of data to save, it was a nightmare for the database architects to structure everything correctly on the database, so it was clear what we had to do next: switch to a NoSQL database. So we switched to MongoDB, and it was also fantastic: we were expending almost zero time in thinking how to structure the Database and the performance also seemed to be better, but again, I have no comparison numbers to show due to the lack of time.

We also decided to switch the website from PHP and Laravel to JavaScript and Node.js and ExpressJS since working with the JSON Data that we were saving now in the Database would be easier.

As of now, we don't only use the tool intern but we also opened it for everyone to use for free: https://tool-seo.com

See more
Gev Balyan
Gev Balyan
Founder at UCRAFT · | 4 upvotes · 25.6K views
atUCRAFTUCRAFT
Laravel
Laravel
JavaScript
JavaScript
Ember.js
Ember.js
Composer
Composer
MySQL
MySQL
PHP
PHP

We recently decided to rewrite Ucraft's Laravel from scratch.

The goal is to make everything more Laravel friendly that will speak to frontend JavaScript , built on Ember.js via JSON Patch standard. This will also make out app better extendible and overridable.

The namespeaces are going to be more correct and the app itself will be compatible with Composer packages.

This also improves the connection between MySQL and PHP making the reoccurring MySQL queries cached during the lifecycle.

See more
Zach Holman
Zach Holman
React
React
Apollo
Apollo
Rails
Rails
JavaScript
JavaScript

Oof. I have truly hated JavaScript for a long time. Like, for over twenty years now. Like, since the Clinton administration. It's always been a nightmare to deal with all of the aspects of that silly language.

But wowza, things have changed. Tooling is just way, way better. I'm primarily web-oriented, and using React and Apollo together the past few years really opened my eyes to building rich apps. And I deeply apologize for using the phrase rich apps; I don't think I've ever said such Enterprisey words before.

But yeah, things are different now. I still love Rails, and still use it for a lot of apps I build. But it's that silly rich apps phrase that's the problem. Users have way more comprehensive expectations than they did even five years ago, and the JS community does a good job at building tools and tech that tackle the problems of making heavy, complicated UI and frontend work.

Obviously there's a lot of things happening here, so just saying "JavaScript isn't terrible" might encompass a huge amount of libraries and frameworks. But if you're like me, yeah, give things another shot- I'm somehow not hating on JavaScript anymore and... gulp... I kinda love it.

See more
Visual Studio Code
Visual Studio Code
GitHub
GitHub
Linux
Linux
JavaScript
JavaScript
Swift
Swift
Java
Java
PHP
PHP
Python
Python
XML
XML
JSON
JSON
Git
Git
SVN (Subversion)
SVN (Subversion)

I use Visual Studio Code because at this time is a mature software and I can do practically everything using it.

  • It's free and open source: The project is hosted on GitHub and it’s free to download, fork, modify and contribute to the project.

  • Multi-platform: You can download binaries for different platforms, included Windows (x64), MacOS and Linux (.rpm and .deb packages)

  • LightWeight: It runs smoothly in different devices. It has an average memory and CPU usage. Starts almost immediately and it’s very stable.

  • Extended language support: Supports by default the majority of the most used languages and syntax like JavaScript, HTML, C#, Swift, Java, PHP, Python and others. Also, VS Code supports different file types associated to projects like .ini, .properties, XML and JSON files.

  • Integrated tools: Includes an integrated terminal, debugger, problem list and console