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Magit

17
9
+ 1
2
Mercurial

213
193
+ 1
106
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Magit vs Mercurial: What are the differences?

What is Magit? It's Magit! A Git Porcelain inside Emacs. Magit is an interface to the version control system Git, implemented as an Emacs package. Magit aspires to be a complete Git porcelain. While we cannot (yet) claim that Magit wraps and improves upon each and every Git command, it is complete enough to allow even experienced Git users to perform almost all of their daily version control tasks directly from within Emacs. While many fine Git clients exist, only Magit and Git itself deserve to be called porcelains.

What is Mercurial? A distributed version control system. Mercurial is dedicated to speed and efficiency with a sane user interface. It is written in Python. Mercurial's implementation and data structures are designed to be fast. You can generate diffs between revisions, or jump back in time within seconds.

Magit and Mercurial can be primarily classified as "Version Control System" tools.

Magit is an open source tool with 4.09K GitHub stars and 599 GitHub forks. Here's a link to Magit's open source repository on GitHub.

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Pros of Magit
Pros of Mercurial
  • 1
    Best parts of GUI and command line git clients combined
  • 1
    Word wise diff highlighting
  • 19
    A lot easier to extend than git
  • 17
    Easy-to-grasp system with nice tools
  • 13
    Works on windows natively without cygwin nonsense
  • 11
    Written in python
  • 9
    Free
  • 8
    Fast
  • 6
    Better than Git
  • 6
    Best GUI
  • 4
    Better than svn
  • 2
    Hg inc
  • 2
    Good user experience
  • 2
    TortoiseHg - Unified free gui for all platforms
  • 2
    Consistent UI
  • 2
    Easy-to-use
  • 2
    Native support to all platforms
  • 1
    Free to use

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Cons of Magit
Cons of Mercurial
  • 1
    Can be slow on big diffs
  • 0
    Track single upstream only
  • 0
    Does not distinguish between local and remote head

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- No public GitHub repository available -

What is Magit?

It is an interface to the version control system Git, implemented as an Emacs package. It aspires to be a complete Git porcelain. While we cannot (yet) claim that it wraps and improves upon each and every Git command, it is complete enough to allow even experienced Git users to perform almost all of their daily version control tasks directly from within Emacs. While many fine Git clients exist, only deserve to be called porcelains.

What is Mercurial?

Mercurial is dedicated to speed and efficiency with a sane user interface. It is written in Python. Mercurial's implementation and data structures are designed to be fast. You can generate diffs between revisions, or jump back in time within seconds.

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Blog Posts

Mar 4 2020 at 5:14PM

Atlassian

GitBitbucketWindows+4
3
735
What are some alternatives to Magit and Mercurial?
Git
Git is a free and open source distributed version control system designed to handle everything from small to very large projects with speed and efficiency.
GitKraken
The downright luxurious Git client for Windows, Mac and Linux. Cross-platform, 100% standalone, and free.
SourceTree
Use the full capability of Git and Mercurial in the SourceTree desktop app. Manage all your repositories, hosted or local, through SourceTree's simple interface.
SVN (Subversion)
Subversion exists to be universally recognized and adopted as an open-source, centralized version control system characterized by its reliability as a safe haven for valuable data; the simplicity of its model and usage; and its ability to support the needs of a wide variety of users and projects, from individuals to large-scale enterprise operations.
DVC
It is an open-source Version Control System for data science and machine learning projects. It is designed to handle large files, data sets, machine learning models, and metrics as well as code.
See all alternatives