Markdown vs Scala

Get Advice Icon

Need advice about which tool to choose?Ask the StackShare community!

Markdown
Markdown

6.1K
4.5K
+ 1
962
Scala
Scala

3.4K
2.5K
+ 1
1.5K
Add tool

Markdown vs Scala: What are the differences?

Markdown: Text-to-HTML conversion tool/syntax for web writers, by John Gruber. Markdown is two things: (1) a plain text formatting syntax; and (2) a software tool, written in Perl, that converts the plain text formatting to HTML; Scala: A pure-bred object-oriented language that runs on the JVM. Scala is an acronym for “Scalable Language”. This means that Scala grows with you. You can play with it by typing one-line expressions and observing the results. But you can also rely on it for large mission critical systems, as many companies, including Twitter, LinkedIn, or Intel do. To some, Scala feels like a scripting language. Its syntax is concise and low ceremony; its types get out of the way because the compiler can infer them.

Markdown and Scala can be categorized as "Languages" tools.

"Easy formatting", "Widely adopted" and "Intuitive" are the key factors why developers consider Markdown; whereas "Static typing", "Jvm" and "Pattern-matching" are the primary reasons why Scala is favored.

Scala is an open source tool with 11.8K GitHub stars and 2.75K GitHub forks. Here's a link to Scala's open source repository on GitHub.

According to the StackShare community, Markdown has a broader approval, being mentioned in 756 company stacks & 718 developers stacks; compared to Scala, which is listed in 437 company stacks and 324 developer stacks.

- No public GitHub repository available -

What is Markdown?

Markdown is two things: (1) a plain text formatting syntax; and (2) a software tool, written in Perl, that converts the plain text formatting to HTML.

What is Scala?

Scala is an acronym for “Scalable Language”. This means that Scala grows with you. You can play with it by typing one-line expressions and observing the results. But you can also rely on it for large mission critical systems, as many companies, including Twitter, LinkedIn, or Intel do. To some, Scala feels like a scripting language. Its syntax is concise and low ceremony; its types get out of the way because the compiler can infer them.
Get Advice Icon

Need advice about which tool to choose?Ask the StackShare community!

Why do developers choose Markdown?
Why do developers choose Scala?

Sign up to add, upvote and see more prosMake informed product decisions

What companies use Markdown?
What companies use Scala?

Sign up to get full access to all the companiesMake informed product decisions

What tools integrate with Markdown?
What tools integrate with Scala?

Sign up to get full access to all the tool integrationsMake informed product decisions

What are some alternatives to Markdown and Scala?
PHP
Fast, flexible and pragmatic, PHP powers everything from your blog to the most popular websites in the world.
JavaScript
JavaScript is most known as the scripting language for Web pages, but used in many non-browser environments as well such as node.js or Apache CouchDB. It is a prototype-based, multi-paradigm scripting language that is dynamic,and supports object-oriented, imperative, and functional programming styles.
Python
Python is a general purpose programming language created by Guido Van Rossum. Python is most praised for its elegant syntax and readable code, if you are just beginning your programming career python suits you best.
Java
Java is a programming language and computing platform first released by Sun Microsystems in 1995. There are lots of applications and websites that will not work unless you have Java installed, and more are created every day. Java is fast, secure, and reliable. From laptops to datacenters, game consoles to scientific supercomputers, cell phones to the Internet, Java is everywhere!
HTML5
HTML5 is a core technology markup language of the Internet used for structuring and presenting content for the World Wide Web. As of October 2014 this is the final and complete fifth revision of the HTML standard of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). The previous version, HTML 4, was standardised in 1997.
See all alternatives
Decisions about Markdown and Scala
Marc Bollinger
Marc Bollinger
Infra & Data Eng Manager at Thumbtack · | 4 upvotes · 134.4K views
atLumosityLumosity
Node.js
Node.js
Ruby
Ruby
Kafka
Kafka
Scala
Scala
Apache Storm
Apache Storm
Heron
Heron
Redis
Redis
Pulsar
Pulsar

Lumosity is home to the world's largest cognitive training database, a responsibility we take seriously. For most of the company's history, our analysis of user behavior and training data has been powered by an event stream--first a simple Node.js pub/sub app, then a heavyweight Ruby app with stronger durability. Both supported decent throughput and latency, but they lacked some major features supported by existing open-source alternatives: replaying existing messages (also lacking in most message queue-based solutions), scaling out many different readers for the same stream, the ability to leverage existing solutions for reading and writing, and possibly most importantly: the ability to hire someone externally who already had expertise.

We ultimately migrated to Kafka in early- to mid-2016, citing both industry trends in companies we'd talked to with similar durability and throughput needs, the extremely strong documentation and community. We pored over Kyle Kingsbury's Jepsen post (https://aphyr.com/posts/293-jepsen-Kafka), as well as Jay Kreps' follow-up (http://blog.empathybox.com/post/62279088548/a-few-notes-on-kafka-and-jepsen), talked at length with Confluent folks and community members, and still wound up running parallel systems for quite a long time, but ultimately, we've been very, very happy. Understanding the internals and proper levers takes some commitment, but it's taken very little maintenance once configured. Since then, the Confluent Platform community has grown and grown; we've gone from doing most development using custom Scala consumers and producers to being 60/40 Kafka Streams/Connects.

We originally looked into Storm / Heron , and we'd moved on from Redis pub/sub. Heron looks great, but we already had a programming model across services that was more akin to consuming a message consumers than required a topology of bolts, etc. Heron also had just come out while we were starting to migrate things, and the community momentum and direction of Kafka felt more substantial than the older Storm. If we were to start the process over again today, we might check out Pulsar , although the ecosystem is much younger.

To find out more, read our 2017 engineering blog post about the migration!

See more
Yashu Mittal
Yashu Mittal
Founder & CEO at CodeCarrot · | 1 upvotes · 10.3K views
atCodeCarrotCodeCarrot
Jekyll
Jekyll
Ruby
Ruby
Markdown
Markdown

Jekyll is an open source static site generator (SSG) with a Ruby at its core which transform your plain text into static websites and blogs.

It is simple means no more databases, comment moderation, or pesky updates to install—just your content. As said earlier SSG uses Markdown, Liquid, HTML & CSS go in and come out ready for deployment. Lastly it's blog-aware permalinks, categories, pages, posts, and custom layouts are all first-class citizens here.

See more
Johnny Bell
Johnny Bell
Senior Software Engineer at StackShare · | 14 upvotes · 309.3K views
atStackShareStackShare
Markdown
Markdown
React