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Memcached
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Memcached vs UnQLite: What are the differences?

What is Memcached? High-performance, distributed memory object caching system. Memcached is an in-memory key-value store for small chunks of arbitrary data (strings, objects) from results of database calls, API calls, or page rendering.

What is UnQLite? An Embeddable NoSQL Database Engine. UnQLite is a in-process software library which implements a self-contained, serverless, zero-configuration, transactional NoSQL database engine. UnQLite is a document store database similar to MongoDB, Redis, CouchDB etc. as well a standard Key/Value store similar to BerkeleyDB, LevelDB, etc.

Memcached and UnQLite can be primarily classified as "Databases" tools.

Memcached and UnQLite are both open source tools. It seems that Memcached with 9K GitHub stars and 2.6K forks on GitHub has more adoption than UnQLite with 997 GitHub stars and 102 GitHub forks.

What is Memcached?

Memcached is an in-memory key-value store for small chunks of arbitrary data (strings, objects) from results of database calls, API calls, or page rendering.

What is UnQLite?

UnQLite is a in-process software library which implements a self-contained, serverless, zero-configuration, transactional NoSQL database engine. UnQLite is a document store database similar to MongoDB, Redis, CouchDB etc. as well a standard Key/Value store similar to BerkeleyDB, LevelDB, etc.
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            What are some alternatives to Memcached and UnQLite?
            Redis
            Redis is an open source, BSD licensed, advanced key-value store. It is often referred to as a data structure server since keys can contain strings, hashes, lists, sets and sorted sets.
            Ehcache
            Ehcache is an open source, standards-based cache for boosting performance, offloading your database, and simplifying scalability. It's the most widely-used Java-based cache because it's robust, proven, and full-featured. Ehcache scales from in-process, with one or more nodes, all the way to mixed in-process/out-of-process configurations with terabyte-sized caches.
            Varnish
            Varnish Cache is a web application accelerator also known as a caching HTTP reverse proxy. You install it in front of any server that speaks HTTP and configure it to cache the contents. Varnish Cache is really, really fast. It typically speeds up delivery with a factor of 300 - 1000x, depending on your architecture.
            Hazelcast
            With its various distributed data structures, distributed caching capabilities, elastic nature, memcache support, integration with Spring and Hibernate and more importantly with so many happy users, Hazelcast is feature-rich, enterprise-ready and developer-friendly in-memory data grid solution.
            MongoDB
            MongoDB stores data in JSON-like documents that can vary in structure, offering a dynamic, flexible schema. MongoDB was also designed for high availability and scalability, with built-in replication and auto-sharding.
            See all alternatives
            Decisions about Memcached and UnQLite
            HAProxy
            HAProxy
            Varnish
            Varnish
            Tornado
            Tornado
            Django
            Django
            Redis
            Redis
            RabbitMQ
            RabbitMQ
            nginx
            nginx
            Memcached
            Memcached
            MySQL
            MySQL
            Python
            Python
            Node.js
            Node.js

            Around the time of their Series A, Pinterest’s stack included Python and Django, with Tornado and Node.js as web servers. Memcached / Membase and Redis handled caching, with RabbitMQ handling queueing. Nginx, HAproxy and Varnish managed static-delivery and load-balancing, with persistent data storage handled by MySQL.

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            Kir Shatrov
            Kir Shatrov
            Production Engineer at Shopify · | 12 upvotes · 49.8K views
            atShopifyShopify
            Redis
            Redis
            Memcached
            Memcached
            MySQL
            MySQL
            Rails
            Rails

            As is common in the Rails stack, since the very beginning, we've stayed with MySQL as a relational database, Memcached for key/value storage and Redis for queues and background jobs.

            In 2014, we could no longer store all our data in a single MySQL instance - even by buying better hardware. We decided to use sharding and split all of Shopify into dozens of database partitions.

            Sharding played nicely for us because Shopify merchants are isolated from each other and we were able to put a subset of merchants on a single shard. It would have been harder if our business assumed shared data between customers.

            The sharding project bought us some time regarding database capacity, but as we soon found out, there was a huge single point of failure in our infrastructure. All those shards were still using a single Redis. At one point, the outage of that Redis took down all of Shopify, causing a major disruption we later called “Redismageddon”. This taught us an important lesson to avoid any resources that are shared across all of Shopify.

            Over the years, we moved from shards to the concept of "pods". A pod is a fully isolated instance of Shopify with its own datastores like MySQL, Redis, memcached. A pod can be spawned in any region. This approach has helped us eliminate global outages. As of today, we have more than a hundred pods, and since moving to this architecture we haven't had any major outages that affected all of Shopify. An outage today only affects a single pod or region.

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            Kir Shatrov
            Kir Shatrov
            Production Engineer at Shopify · | 13 upvotes · 85.1K views
            atShopifyShopify
            Memcached
            Memcached
            Redis
            Redis
            MySQL
            MySQL
            Google Kubernetes Engine
            Google Kubernetes Engine
            Kubernetes
            Kubernetes
            Docker
            Docker

            At Shopify, over the years, we moved from shards to the concept of "pods". A pod is a fully isolated instance of Shopify with its own datastores like MySQL, Redis, Memcached. A pod can be spawned in any region. This approach has helped us eliminate global outages. As of today, we have more than a hundred pods, and since moving to this architecture we haven't had any major outages that affected all of Shopify. An outage today only affects a single pod or region.

            As we grew into hundreds of shards and pods, it became clear that we needed a solution to orchestrate those deployments. Today, we use Docker, Kubernetes, and Google Kubernetes Engine to make it easy to bootstrap resources for new Shopify Pods.

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            Amazon ElastiCache
            Amazon ElastiCache
            Amazon Elasticsearch Service
            Amazon Elasticsearch Service
            AWS Elastic Load Balancing (ELB)
            AWS Elastic Load Balancing (ELB)
            Memcached
            Memcached
            Redis
            Redis
            Python
            Python
            AWS Lambda
            AWS Lambda
            Amazon RDS
            Amazon RDS
            Microsoft SQL Server
            Microsoft SQL Server
            MariaDB
            MariaDB
            Amazon RDS for PostgreSQL
            Amazon RDS for PostgreSQL
            Rails
            Rails
            Ruby
            Ruby
            Heroku
            Heroku
            AWS Elastic Beanstalk
            AWS Elastic Beanstalk

            We initially started out with Heroku as our PaaS provider due to a desire to use it by our original developer for our Ruby on Rails application/website at the time. We were finding response times slow, it was painfully slow, sometimes taking 10 seconds to start loading the main page. Moving up to the next "compute" level was going to be very expensive.

            We moved our site over to AWS Elastic Beanstalk , not only did response times on the site practically become instant, our cloud bill for the application was cut in half.

            In database world we are currently using Amazon RDS for PostgreSQL also, we have both MariaDB and Microsoft SQL Server both hosted on Amazon RDS. The plan is to migrate to AWS Aurora Serverless for all 3 of those database systems.

            Additional services we use for our public applications: AWS Lambda, Python, Redis, Memcached, AWS Elastic Load Balancing (ELB), Amazon Elasticsearch Service, Amazon ElastiCache

            See more
            StackShare Editors
            StackShare Editors
            Apache Thrift
            Apache Thrift
            Kotlin
            Kotlin
            Presto
            Presto
            HHVM (HipHop Virtual Machine)
            HHVM (HipHop Virtual Machine)
            gRPC
            gRPC
            Kubernetes
            Kubernetes
            Apache Spark
            Apache Spark
            Airflow
            Airflow
            Terraform
            Terraform
            Hadoop
            Hadoop
            Swift
            Swift
            Hack
            Hack
            Memcached
            Memcached
            Consul
            Consul
            Chef
            Chef
            Prometheus
            Prometheus

            Since the beginning, Cal Henderson has been the CTO of Slack. Earlier this year, he commented on a Quora question summarizing their current stack.

            Apps
            • Web: a mix of JavaScript/ES6 and React.
            • Desktop: And Electron to ship it as a desktop application.
            • Android: a mix of Java and Kotlin.
            • iOS: written in a mix of Objective C and Swift.
            Backend
            • The core application and the API written in PHP/Hack that runs on HHVM.
            • The data is stored in MySQL using Vitess.
            • Caching is done using Memcached and MCRouter.
            • The search service takes help from SolrCloud, with various Java services.
            • The messaging system uses WebSockets with many services in Java and Go.
            • Load balancing is done using HAproxy with Consul for configuration.
            • Most services talk to each other over gRPC,
            • Some Thrift and JSON-over-HTTP
            • Voice and video calling service was built in Elixir.
            Data warehouse
            • Built using open source tools including Presto, Spark, Airflow, Hadoop and Kafka.
            Etc
            See more
            Julien DeFrance
            Julien DeFrance
            Full Stack Engineering Manager at ValiMail · | 16 upvotes · 270.3K views
            atSmartZipSmartZip
            Amazon DynamoDB
            Amazon DynamoDB
            Ruby
            Ruby
            Node.js
            Node.js
            AWS Lambda
            AWS Lambda
            New Relic
            New Relic
            Amazon Elasticsearch Service
            Amazon Elasticsearch Service
            Elasticsearch
            Elasticsearch
            Superset
            Superset
            Amazon Quicksight
            Amazon Quicksight
            Amazon Redshift
            Amazon Redshift
            Zapier
            Zapier
            Segment
            Segment
            Amazon CloudFront
            Amazon CloudFront
            Memcached
            Memcached
            Amazon ElastiCache
            Amazon ElastiCache
            Amazon RDS for Aurora
            Amazon RDS for Aurora
            MySQL
            MySQL
            Amazon RDS
            Amazon RDS
            Amazon S3
            Amazon S3
            Docker
            Docker
            Capistrano
            Capistrano
            AWS Elastic Beanstalk
            AWS Elastic Beanstalk
            Rails API
            Rails API
            Rails
            Rails
            Algolia
            Algolia

            Back in 2014, I was given an opportunity to re-architect SmartZip Analytics platform, and flagship product: SmartTargeting. This is a SaaS software helping real estate professionals keeping up with their prospects and leads in a given neighborhood/territory, finding out (thanks to predictive analytics) who's the most likely to list/sell their home, and running cross-channel marketing automation against them: direct mail, online ads, email... The company also does provide Data APIs to Enterprise customers.

            I had inherited years and years of technical debt and I knew things had to change radically. The first enabler to this was to make use of the cloud and go with AWS, so we would stop re-inventing the wheel, and build around managed/scalable services.

            For the SaaS product, we kept on working with Rails as this was what my team had the most knowledge in. We've however broken up the monolith and decoupled the front-end application from the backend thanks to the use of Rails API so we'd get independently scalable micro-services from now on.

            Our various applications could now be deployed using AWS Elastic Beanstalk so we wouldn't waste any more efforts writing time-consuming Capistrano deployment scripts for instance. Combined with Docker so our application would run within its own container, independently from the underlying host configuration.

            Storage-wise, we went with Amazon S3 and ditched any pre-existing local or network storage people used to deal with in our legacy systems. On the database side: Amazon RDS / MySQL initially. Ultimately migrated to Amazon RDS for Aurora / MySQL when it got released. Once again, here you need a managed service your cloud provider handles for you.

            Future improvements / technology decisions included:

            Caching: Amazon ElastiCache / Memcached CDN: Amazon CloudFront Systems Integration: Segment / Zapier Data-warehousing: Amazon Redshift BI: Amazon Quicksight / Superset Search: Elasticsearch / Amazon Elasticsearch Service / Algolia Monitoring: New Relic

            As our usage grows, patterns changed, and/or our business needs evolved, my role as Engineering Manager then Director of Engineering was also to ensure my team kept on learning and innovating, while delivering on business value.

            One of these innovations was to get ourselves into Serverless : Adopting AWS Lambda was a big step forward. At the time, only available for Node.js (Not Ruby ) but a great way to handle cost efficiency, unpredictable traffic, sudden bursts of traffic... Ultimately you want the whole chain of services involved in a call to be serverless, and that's when we've started leveraging Amazon DynamoDB on these projects so they'd be fully scalable.

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            Yonas Beshawred
            Yonas Beshawred
            CEO at StackShare · | 9 upvotes · 23.3K views
            atStackShareStackShare
            Memcached
            Memcached
            Heroku
            Heroku
            Amazon ElastiCache
            Amazon ElastiCache
            Rails
            Rails
            PostgreSQL
            PostgreSQL
            MemCachier
            MemCachier
            #RailsCaching
            #Caching

            We decided to use MemCachier as our Memcached provider because we were seeing some serious PostgreSQL performance issues with query-heavy pages on the site. We use MemCachier for all Rails caching and pretty aggressively too for the logged out experience (fully cached pages for the most part). We really need to move to Amazon ElastiCache as soon as possible so we can stop paying so much. The only reason we're not moving is because there are some restrictions on the network side due to our main app being hosted on Heroku.

            #Caching #RailsCaching

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            Interest over time
            Reviews of Memcached and UnQLite
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            How developers use Memcached and UnQLite
            Avatar of Reactor Digital
            Reactor Digital uses MemcachedMemcached

            As part of the cacheing system within Drupal.

            Memcached mainly took care of creating and rebuilding the REST API cache once changes had been made within Drupal.

            Avatar of Casey Smith
            Casey Smith uses MemcachedMemcached

            Distributed cache exposed through Google App Engine APIs; use to stage fresh data (incoming and recently processed) for faster access in data processing pipeline.

            Avatar of The Independent
            The Independent uses MemcachedMemcached

            Memcache caches database results and articles, reducing overall DB load and allowing seamless DB maintenance during quiet periods.

            Avatar of eXon Technologies
            eXon Technologies uses MemcachedMemcached

            Used to cache most used files for our clients. Connected with CloudFlare Railgun Optimizer.

            Avatar of ScholaNoctis
            ScholaNoctis uses MemcachedMemcached

            Memcached is used as a simple page cache across the whole application.

            How much does Memcached cost?
            How much does UnQLite cost?
            Pricing unavailable
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