MongoDB vs Pouchdb

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MongoDB
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MongoDB vs Pouchdb: What are the differences?

What is MongoDB? The database for giant ideas. MongoDB stores data in JSON-like documents that can vary in structure, offering a dynamic, flexible schema. MongoDB was also designed for high availability and scalability, with built-in replication and auto-sharding.

What is Pouchdb? Open-source JavaScript database inspired by Apache CouchDB that's designed to run well within the browser. PouchDB enables applications to store data locally while offline, then synchronize it with CouchDB and compatible servers when the application is back online, keeping the user's data in sync no matter where they next login.

MongoDB and Pouchdb belong to "Databases" category of the tech stack.

MongoDB and Pouchdb are both open source tools. MongoDB with 16.2K GitHub stars and 4.08K forks on GitHub appears to be more popular than Pouchdb with 12.1K GitHub stars and 1.2K GitHub forks.

Uber Technologies, Lyft, and Codecademy are some of the popular companies that use MongoDB, whereas Pouchdb is used by BrightMachine, Greenkeeper, and SearchBookGo, LLC.. MongoDB has a broader approval, being mentioned in 2175 company stacks & 2145 developers stacks; compared to Pouchdb, which is listed in 8 company stacks and 9 developer stacks.

What is MongoDB?

MongoDB stores data in JSON-like documents that can vary in structure, offering a dynamic, flexible schema. MongoDB was also designed for high availability and scalability, with built-in replication and auto-sharding.

What is Pouchdb?

PouchDB enables applications to store data locally while offline, then synchronize it with CouchDB and compatible servers when the application is back online, keeping the user's data in sync no matter where they next login.
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    What are some alternatives to MongoDB and Pouchdb?
    Amazon DynamoDB
    With it , you can offload the administrative burden of operating and scaling a highly available distributed database cluster, while paying a low price for only what you use.
    Couchbase
    Developed as an alternative to traditionally inflexible SQL databases, the Couchbase NoSQL database is built on an open source foundation and architected to help developers solve real-world problems and meet high scalability demands.
    MySQL
    The MySQL software delivers a very fast, multi-threaded, multi-user, and robust SQL (Structured Query Language) database server. MySQL Server is intended for mission-critical, heavy-load production systems as well as for embedding into mass-deployed software.
    PostgreSQL
    PostgreSQL is an advanced object-relational database management system that supports an extended subset of the SQL standard, including transactions, foreign keys, subqueries, triggers, user-defined types and functions.
    Cassandra
    Partitioning means that Cassandra can distribute your data across multiple machines in an application-transparent matter. Cassandra will automatically repartition as machines are added and removed from the cluster. Row store means that like relational databases, Cassandra organizes data by rows and columns. The Cassandra Query Language (CQL) is a close relative of SQL.
    See all alternatives
    Decisions about MongoDB and Pouchdb
    MongoDB
    MongoDB

    I starting using MongoDB because it was much easier to implement in production then hosted SQL, and found that a lot of the limitation you think of from a document store vs a relational database were overcome by connecting the application to a graphql API, making retrieval seamless. Mongos latest upgrades as well as Stitch and Mongo mobile make it a perfect fit especially if your application will be cross platform web and mobile.

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    Zach Coffin
    Zach Coffin
    Software Developer · | 3 upvotes · 7.5K views
    MongoDB
    MongoDB
    PostgreSQL
    PostgreSQL

    I started using PostgreSQL because I started a job at a company that was already using it as well as MongoDB. The main difference between the two from my perspective is that postgres columns are a chore to add/remove/modify whereas you can throw whatever you want into a mongo collection. And personally I prefer the query language for postgres over that of mongo, but they both have their merits. Maybe someday I'll be a DBA and have more insight to share but for now there's my 2 cents.

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    Antonio Sanchez
    Antonio Sanchez
    CEO at Kokoen GmbH · | 11 upvotes · 84.1K views
    atKokoen GmbHKokoen GmbH
    ExpressJS
    ExpressJS
    Node.js
    Node.js
    JavaScript
    JavaScript
    MongoDB
    MongoDB
    Go
    Go
    MySQL
    MySQL
    Laravel
    Laravel
    PHP
    PHP

    Back at the start of 2017, we decided to create a web-based tool for the SEO OnPage analysis of our clients' websites. We had over 2.000 websites to analyze, so we had to perform thousands of requests to get every single page from those websites, process the information and save the big amounts of data somewhere.

    Very soon we realized that the initial chosen script language and database, PHP, Laravel and MySQL, was not going to be able to cope efficiently with such a task.

    By that time, we were doing some experiments for other projects with a language we had recently get to know, Go , so we decided to get a try and code the crawler using it. It was fantastic, we could process much more data with way less CPU power and in less time. By using the concurrency abilites that the language has to offers, we could also do more Http requests in less time.

    Unfortunately, I have no comparison numbers to show about the performance differences between Go and PHP since the difference was so clear from the beginning and that we didn't feel the need to do further comparison tests nor document it. We just switched fully to Go.

    There was still a problem: despite the big amount of Data we were generating, MySQL was performing very well, but as we were adding more and more features to the software and with those features more and more different type of data to save, it was a nightmare for the database architects to structure everything correctly on the database, so it was clear what we had to do next: switch to a NoSQL database. So we switched to MongoDB, and it was also fantastic: we were expending almost zero time in thinking how to structure the Database and the performance also seemed to be better, but again, I have no comparison numbers to show due to the lack of time.

    We also decided to switch the website from PHP and Laravel to JavaScript and Node.js and ExpressJS since working with the JSON Data that we were saving now in the Database would be easier.

    As of now, we don't only use the tool intern but we also opened it for everyone to use for free: https://tool-seo.com

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    Jonathan Pugh
    Jonathan Pugh
    Software Engineer / Project Manager / Technical Architect · | 18 upvotes · 175.9K views
    Pouchdb
    Pouchdb
    CouchDB
    CouchDB
    Font Awesome
    Font Awesome
    CSS 3
    CSS 3
    Apache Cordova
    Apache Cordova
    PhoneGap
    PhoneGap
    HTML5
    HTML5
    Ruby
    Ruby
    Babel
    Babel
    Webpack
    Webpack
    Visual Studio Code
    Visual Studio Code
    Figma
    Figma
    TypeScript
    TypeScript
    JavaScript
    JavaScript
    Framework7
    Framework7
    #Css
    #CSS3
    #SCSS
    #Sass
    #Less
    #Electron
    #HandleBars
    #Template7
    #Sketch
    #GraphQL
    #HTML5
    #GraphCool

    I needed to choose a full stack of tools for cross platform mobile application design & development. After much research and trying different tools, these are what I came up with that work for me today:

    For the client coding I chose Framework7 because of its performance, easy learning curve, and very well designed, beautiful UI widgets. I think it's perfect for solo development or small teams. I didn't like React Native. It felt heavy to me and rigid. Framework7 allows the use of #CSS3, which I think is the best technology to come out of the #WWW movement. No other tech has been able to allow designers and developers to develop such flexible, high performance, customisable user interface elements that are highly responsive and hardware accelerated before. Now #CSS3 includes variables and flexboxes it is truly a powerful language and there is no longer a need for preprocessors such as #SCSS / #Sass / #less. React Native contains a very limited interpretation of #CSS3 which I found very frustrating after using #CSS3 for some years already and knowing its powerful features. The other very nice feature of Framework7 is that you can even build for the browser if you want your app to be available for desktop web browsers. The latest release also includes the ability to build for #Electron so you can have MacOS, Windows and Linux desktop apps. This is not possible with React Native yet.

    Framework7 runs on top of Apache Cordova. Cordova and webviews have been slated as being slow in the past. Having a game developer background I found the tweeks to make it run as smooth as silk. One of those tweeks is to use WKWebView. Another important one was using srcset on images.

    I use #Template7 for the for the templating system which is a no-nonsense mobile-centric #HandleBars style extensible templating system. It's easy to write custom helpers for, is fast and has a small footprint. I'm not forced into a new paradigm or learning some new syntax. It operates with standard JavaScript, HTML5 and CSS 3. It's written by the developer of Framework7 and so dovetails with it as expected.

    I configured TypeScript to work with the latest version of Framework7. I consider TypeScript to be one of the best creations to come out of Microsoft in some time. They must have an amazing team working on it. It's very powerful and flexible. It helps you catch a lot of bugs and also provides code completion in supporting IDEs. So for my IDE I use Visual Studio Code which is a blazingly fast and silky smooth editor that integrates seamlessly with TypeScript for the ultimate type checking setup (both products are produced by Microsoft).

    I use Webpack and Babel to compile the JavaScript. TypeScript can compile to JavaScript directly but Babel offers a few more options and polyfills so you can use the latest (and even prerelease) JavaScript features today and compile to be backwards compatible with virtually any browser. My favorite recent addition is "optional chaining" which greatly simplifies and increases readability of a number of sections of my code dealing with getting and setting data in nested objects.

    I use some Ruby scripts to process images with ImageMagick and pngquant to optimise for size and even auto insert responsive image code into the HTML5. Ruby is the ultimate cross platform scripting language. Even as your scripts become large, Ruby allows you to refactor your code easily and make it Object Oriented if necessary. I find it the quickest and easiest way to maintain certain aspects of my build process.

    For the user interface design and prototyping I use Figma. Figma has an almost identical user interface to #Sketch but has the added advantage of being cross platform (MacOS and Windows). Its real-time collaboration features are outstanding and I use them a often as I work mostly on remote projects. Clients can collaborate in real-time and see changes I make as I make them. The clickable prototyping features in Figma are also very well designed and mean I can send clickable prototypes to clients to try user interface updates as they are made and get immediate feedback. I'm currently also evaluating the latest version of #AdobeXD as an alternative to Figma as it has the very cool auto-animate feature. It doesn't have real-time collaboration yet, but I heard it is proposed for 2019.

    For the UI icons I use Font Awesome Pro. They have the largest selection and best looking icons you can find on the internet with several variations in styles so you can find most of the icons you want for standard projects.

    For the backend I was using the #GraphCool Framework. As I later found out, #GraphQL still has some way to go in order to provide the full power of a mature graph query language so later in my project I ripped out #GraphCool and replaced it with CouchDB and Pouchdb. Primarily so I could provide good offline app support. CouchDB with Pouchdb is very flexible and efficient combination and overcomes some of the restrictions I found in #GraphQL and hence #GraphCool also. The most impressive and important feature of CouchDB is its replication. You can configure it in various ways for backups, fault tolerance, caching or conditional merging of databases. CouchDB and Pouchdb even supports storing, retrieving and serving binary or image data or other mime types. This removes a level of complexity usually present in database implementations where binary or image data is usually referenced through an #HTML5 link. With CouchDB and Pouchdb apps can operate offline and sync later, very efficiently, when the network connection is good.

    I use PhoneGap when testing the app. It auto-reloads your app when its code is changed and you can also install it on Android phones to preview your app instantly. iOS is a bit more tricky cause of Apple's policies so it's not available on the App Store, but you can build it and install it yourself to your device.

    So that's my latest mobile stack. What tools do you use? Have you tried these ones?

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    Jeyabalaji Subramanian
    Jeyabalaji Subramanian
    CTO at FundsCorner · | 24 upvotes · 263.5K views
    atFundsCornerFundsCorner
    Zappa
    Zappa
    AWS Lambda
    AWS Lambda
    SQLAlchemy
    SQLAlchemy
    Python
    Python
    Amazon SQS
    Amazon SQS
    Node.js
    Node.js
    MongoDB Stitch
    MongoDB Stitch
    PostgreSQL
    PostgreSQL
    MongoDB
    MongoDB

    Recently we were looking at a few robust and cost-effective ways of replicating the data that resides in our production MongoDB to a PostgreSQL database for data warehousing and business intelligence.

    We set ourselves the following criteria for the optimal tool that would do this job: - The data replication must be near real-time, yet it should NOT impact the production database - The data replication must be horizontally scalable (based on the load), asynchronous & crash-resilient

    Based on the above criteria, we selected the following tools to perform the end to end data replication:

    We chose MongoDB Stitch for picking up the changes in the source database. It is the serverless platform from MongoDB. One of the services offered by MongoDB Stitch is Stitch Triggers. Using stitch triggers, you can execute a serverless function (in Node.js) in real time in response to changes in the database. When there are a lot of database changes, Stitch automatically "feeds forward" these changes through an asynchronous queue.

    We chose Amazon SQS as the pipe / message backbone for communicating the changes from MongoDB to our own replication service. Interestingly enough, MongoDB stitch offers integration with AWS services.

    In the Node.js function, we wrote minimal functionality to communicate the database changes (insert / update / delete / replace) to Amazon SQS.

    Next we wrote a minimal micro-service in Python to listen to the message events on SQS, pickup the data payload & mirror the DB changes on to the target Data warehouse. We implemented source data to target data translation by modelling target table structures through SQLAlchemy . We deployed this micro-service as AWS Lambda with Zappa. With Zappa, deploying your services as event-driven & horizontally scalable Lambda service is dumb-easy.

    In the end, we got to implement a highly scalable near realtime Change Data Replication service that "works" and deployed to production in a matter of few days!

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    Khauth György
    Khauth György
    CTO at SalesAutopilot Kft. · | 11 upvotes · 94.8K views
    atSalesAutopilot Kft.SalesAutopilot Kft.
    AWS CodePipeline
    AWS CodePipeline
    Jenkins
    Jenkins
    Docker
    Docker
    vuex
    vuex
    Vuetify
    Vuetify
    Vue.js
    Vue.js
    jQuery UI
    jQuery UI
    Redis
    Redis
    MongoDB
    MongoDB
    MySQL
    MySQL
    Amazon Route 53
    Amazon Route 53
    Amazon CloudFront
    Amazon CloudFront
    Amazon SNS
    Amazon SNS
    Amazon CloudWatch
    Amazon CloudWatch
    GitHub
    GitHub

    I'm the CTO of a marketing automation SaaS. Because of the continuously increasing load we moved to the AWSCloud. We are using more and more features of AWS: Amazon CloudWatch, Amazon SNS, Amazon CloudFront, Amazon Route 53 and so on.

    Our main Database is MySQL but for the hundreds of GB document data we use MongoDB more and more. We started to use Redis for cache and other time sensitive operations.

    On the front-end we use jQuery UI + Smarty but now we refactor our app to use Vue.js with Vuetify. Because our app is relatively complex we need to use vuex as well.

    On the development side we use GitHub as our main repo, Docker for local and server environment and Jenkins and AWS CodePipeline for Continuous Integration.

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    Jeyabalaji Subramanian
    Jeyabalaji Subramanian
    CTO at FundsCorner · | 12 upvotes · 21.1K views
    atFundsCornerFundsCorner
    MongoDB Atlas
    MongoDB Atlas
    MongoDB
    MongoDB
    PostgreSQL
    PostgreSQL

    Database is at the heart of any technology stack. It is no wonder we spend a lot of time choosing the right database before we dive deep into product building.

    When we were faced with the question of what database to choose, we set the following criteria: The database must (1) Have a very high transaction throughput. We wanted to err on the side of "reads" but not on the "writes". (2) be flexible. I.e. be adaptive enough to take - in data variations. Since we are an early-stage start-up, not everything is set in stone. (3) Fast & easy to work with (4) Cloud Native. We did not want to spend our time in "ANY" infrastructure management.

    Based on the above, we picked PostgreSQL and MongoDB for evaluation. We tried a few iterations on hardening the data model with PostgreSQL, but realised that we can move much faster by loosely defining the schema (with just a few fundamental principles intact).

    Thus we switched to MongoDB. Before diving in, we validated a few core principles such as: (1) Transaction guarantee. Until 3.6, MongoDB supports Transaction guarantee at Document level. From 4.0 onwards, you can achieve transaction guarantee across multiple documents.

    (2) Primary Keys & Indexing: Like any RDBMS, MongoDB supports unique keys & indexes to ensure data integrity & search ability

    (3) Ability to join data across data sets: MongoDB offers a super-rich aggregate framework that enables one to filter and group data

    (4) Concurrency handling: MongoDB offers specific operations (such as findOneAndUpdate), which when coupled with Optimistic Locking, can be used to achieve concurrency.

    Above all, MongoDB offers a complete no-frills Cloud Database as a service - MongoDB Atlas. This kind of sealed the deal for us.

    Looking back, choosing MongoDB with MongoDB Atlas was one of the best decisions we took and it is serving us well. My only gripe is that there must be a way to scale-up or scale-down the Atlas configuration at different parts of the day with minimal downtime.

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    Ajit Parthan
    Ajit Parthan
    CTO at Shaw Academy · | 1 upvotes · 5K views
    atShaw AcademyShaw Academy
    MongoDB
    MongoDB
    MySQL
    MySQL
    #NosqlDatabaseAsAService

    Initial storage was traditional MySQL. The pace of changes during a startup mode made it very difficult to have a clean and consistent schema. Large portions ended up as unstructured data stuffed into CLOBs and BLOBs.

    Moving to MongoDB definitely made this part much easier.

    Accessing data for analysis is a little bit of a challenge - especially for people coming from the world of SQL Workbench. But with tools like Exploratory this is becoming less of a problem.

    #NosqlDatabaseAsAService

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    Tim Nolet
    Tim Nolet
    Founder, Engineer & Dishwasher at Checkly · | 8 upvotes · 60.8K views
    atChecklyHQChecklyHQ
    Amazon DynamoDB
    Amazon DynamoDB
    MongoDB
    MongoDB
    Node.js
    Node.js
    Heroku
    Heroku
    PostgreSQL
    PostgreSQL

    PostgreSQL Heroku Node.js MongoDB Amazon DynamoDB

    When I started building Checkly, one of the first things on the agenda was how to actually structure our SaaS database model: think accounts, users, subscriptions etc. Weirdly, there is not a lot of information on this on the "blogopshere" (cringe...). After research and some false starts with MongoDB and Amazon DynamoDB we ended up with PostgreSQL and a schema consisting of just four tables that form the backbone of all generic "Saasy" stuff almost any B2B SaaS bumps into.

    In a nutshell:cPostgreSQL Heroku Node.js MongoDB Amazon DynamoDB

    When I started building Checkly, one of the first things on the agenda was how to actually structure our SaaS database model: think accounts, users, subscriptions etc. Weirdly, there is not a lot of information on this on the "blogopshere" (cringe...). After research and some false starts with MongoDB and Amazon DynamoDB we ended up with PostgreSQL and a schema consisting of just four tables that form the backbone of all generic "Saasy" stuff almost any B2B SaaS bumps into.

    In a nutshell:

    • We use Postgres on Heroku.
    • We use a "one database, on schema" approach for partitioning customer data.
    • We use an accounts, memberships and users table to create a many-to-many relation between users and accounts.
    • We completely decouple prices, payments and the exact ingredients for a customer's plan.

    All the details including a database schema diagram are in the linked blog post.

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    Łukasz Korecki
    Łukasz Korecki
    CTO & Co-founder at EnjoyHQ · | 12 upvotes · 37.5K views
    atEnjoyHQEnjoyHQ
    PostgreSQL
    PostgreSQL
    MongoDB
    MongoDB
    RethinkDB
    RethinkDB

    We initially chose RethinkDB because of the schema-less document store features, and better durability resilience/story than MongoDB In the end, it didn't work out quite as we expected: there's plenty of scalability issues, it's near impossible to run analytical workloads and small community makes working with Rethink a challenge. We're in process of migrating all our workloads to PostgreSQL and hopefully, we will be able to decommission our RethinkDB deployment soon.

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    Mauro Bennici
    Mauro Bennici
    CTO at You Are My GUide · | 7 upvotes · 10.2K views
    atYou Are My GUideYou Are My GUide
    MongoDB
    MongoDB
    TimescaleDB
    TimescaleDB
    PostgreSQL
    PostgreSQL

    PostgreSQL plus TimescaleDB allow us to concentrate the business effort on how to analyze valuable data instead of manage them on IT side. We are now able to ingest thousand of social shares "managed" data without compromise the scalability of the system or the time query. TimescaleDB is transparent to PostgreSQL , so we continue to use the same SQL syntax without any changes. At the same time, because we need to manage few document objects we dismissed the MongoDB cluster.

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    Robert Zuber
    Robert Zuber
    CTO at CircleCI · | 22 upvotes · 143.9K views
    atCircleCICircleCI
    Amazon S3
    Amazon S3
    GitHub
    GitHub
    Redis
    Redis
    PostgreSQL
    PostgreSQL
    MongoDB
    MongoDB

    We use MongoDB as our primary #datastore. Mongo's approach to replica sets enables some fantastic patterns for operations like maintenance, backups, and #ETL.

    As we pull #microservices from our #monolith, we are taking the opportunity to build them with their own datastores using PostgreSQL. We also use Redis to cache data we’d never store permanently, and to rate-limit our requests to partners’ APIs (like GitHub).

    When we’re dealing with large blobs of immutable data (logs, artifacts, and test results), we store them in Amazon S3. We handle any side-effects of S3’s eventual consistency model within our own code. This ensures that we deal with user requests correctly while writes are in process.

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    Martin Johannesson
    Martin Johannesson
    Senior Software Developer at IT Minds · | 10 upvotes · 14.8K views
    atIT MindsIT Minds
    AMP
    AMP
    PWA
    PWA
    React
    React
    MongoDB
    MongoDB
    Next.js
    Next.js
    GraphQL
    GraphQL
    Apollo
    Apollo
    PostgreSQL
    PostgreSQL
    TypeORM
    TypeORM
    Node.js
    Node.js
    TypeScript
    TypeScript
    #Serverless
    #Backend
    #B2B

    At IT Minds we create customized internal or #B2B web and mobile apps. I have a go to stack that I pitch to our customers consisting of 3 core areas. 1) A data core #backend . 2) A micro #serverless #backend. 3) A user client #frontend.

    For the Data Core I create a backend using TypeScript Node.js and with TypeORM connecting to a PostgreSQL Exposing an action based api with Apollo GraphQL

    For the micro serverless backend, which purpose is verification for authentication, autorization, logins and the likes. It is created with Next.js api pages. Using MongoDB to store essential information, caching etc.

    Finally the frontend is built with React using Next.js , TypeScript and @Apollo. We create the frontend as a PWA and have a AMP landing page by default.

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    MongoDB
    MongoDB
    MySQL
    MySQL
    .NET Core
    .NET Core
    C#
    C#

    Hi! I needed to choose a full stack of tools for a web drop shipping site without the payment process for a family startup proyect. It will feed from several web services (JSON), I'm looking forward a 4,200 articles tops. For web use only and for a few clients at the beginning.

    I'm considering C# with .NET Core 3.0 as is the one language I'm starting to learn. For the Database I haven´t made my mind yet, but could be MySQL or MongoDB any advice is welcome as I'm getting back to programming after year away from this awesome world. Thanks

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    Nicolas Apx
    Nicolas Apx
    CEO - FullStack Javascript at Apx Development Limited · | 14 upvotes · 16.6K views
    atAPX DevelopmentAPX Development
    PostgreSQL
    PostgreSQL
    MongoDB
    MongoDB
    Node.js
    Node.js
    Python
    Python

    I am planning on building a micro-service eCommerce back-end to be easy to reuse in any project as we need. I would like to use both Python and Node.js and MongoDB & PostgreSQL , in your opinion which one would best suited for the following services:

    • Users-service
    • Products-service
    • Auth-service
    • Inventory-service
    • Order-service
    • Payment-service
    • Sku-service
    • And more not yet defined....

    Thanks

    Nicolas

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    Interest over time
    Reviews of MongoDB and Pouchdb
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    How developers use MongoDB and Pouchdb
    Avatar of Tarun Singh
    Tarun Singh uses MongoDBMongoDB

    Used MongoDB as primary database. It holds trip data of NYC taxis for the year 2013. It is a huge dataset and it's primary feature is geo coordinates with pickup and drop off locations. Also used MongoDB's map reduce to process this large dataset for aggregation. This aggregated result was then used to show visualizations.

    Avatar of Trello
    Trello uses MongoDBMongoDB

    MongoDB fills our more traditional database needs. We knew we wanted Trello to be blisteringly fast. One of the coolest and most performance-obsessed teams we know is our next-door neighbor and sister company StackExchange. Talking to their dev lead David at lunch one day, I learned that even though they use SQL Server for data storage, they actually primarily store a lot of their data in a denormalized format for performance, and normalize only when they need to.

    Avatar of Foursquare
    Foursquare uses MongoDBMongoDB

    Nearly all of our backend storage is on MongoDB. This has also worked out pretty well. It's enabled us to scale up faster/easier than if we had rolled our own solution on top of PostgreSQL (which we were using previously). There have been a few roadbumps along the way, but the team at 10gen has been a big help with thing.

    Avatar of AngeloR
    AngeloR uses MongoDBMongoDB

    We are testing out MongoDB at the moment. Currently we are only using a small EC2 setup for a delayed job queue backed by agenda. If it works out well we might look to see where it could become a primary document storage engine for us.

    Avatar of Matt Welke
    Matt Welke uses MongoDBMongoDB

    Used for proofs of concept and personal projects with a document data model, especially with need for strong geographic queries. Often not chosen in long term apps due to chance data model can end up relational as needs develop.

    Avatar of Osmo Salomaa
    Osmo Salomaa uses PouchdbPouchdb

    Saving bookmarks to browser's local database, which is periodically synced with a file in the user's Dropbox.

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