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Pharo vs Python: What are the differences?

Developers describe Pharo as "The immersive programming experience". A pure object-oriented programming language and a powerful environment, focused on simplicity and immediate feedback. On the other hand, Python is detailed as "A clear and powerful object-oriented programming language, comparable to Perl, Ruby, Scheme, or Java". Python is a general purpose programming language created by Guido Van Rossum. Python is most praised for its elegant syntax and readable code, if you are just beginning your programming career python suits you best.

Pharo and Python can be categorized as "Languages" tools.

Python is an open source tool with 25.3K GitHub stars and 10.5K GitHub forks. Here's a link to Python's open source repository on GitHub.

Advice on Pharo and Python
Needs advice
on
Python
PHP
and
Node.js

Hi, I have a project on my mind, and I need some help. First of all, I know it is all about personal preference, but I am a beginner in the back-end part. So, I am trying to figure out which language is better, for example, for user authentication and interaction between the users. Also, I don't know which framework is better for this work. My first thought was to use PHP, but after some research on the internet, I'm leaning towards Laravel. I will be grateful if you have some advice for me.

#newbie

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Replies (7)
Recommends
PHP
Node.js

First thoughts: * As a beginner you need to understand concepts first, all languages out there are great, each has it's own philosophy, each is better suited for a specific situation. Learn concepts first, do something, then you will understand the differences between them and why one should be chose over another for a task * As a project manager you want your project to come to an end. You will get lost in all the different solutions out there (and it's good), but don't get lost too far. Very often I see people getting lost in those debates and never achieving things, like someone writing a book that would still be choosing the font 6 months after (we've all done that it's ok, but we have to realise it)

Chances are your project can be equally good on any different stacks. I heard an interview of someone from Uber who said something like they started with python, went to node, went back to python and went to go, and with micro-services now they can have all of them all-together.

Last remark: from what I know Laravel is a framework for PHP, so it IS PHP. Just like Symphony for PHP, Express for Node.js, Koa for Node.js, Flask for Python ...

Now to answer your question :

  • PHP has a big community, it is great and easy to start with, and you will definitely will learn real object oriented structure
  • Node.js has a big community too, don't worry finding help will be as easy. It is less easy to start with but in my point of view it is a lot easier to keep on going with it on a long run. Why ? Because it's very easy to run a new project, and it executes javascript. How is it good ? Because chances are that your front will also be using javascript (React.js / View.js are crazy good). Thanks to that you will be able to master the language better because you will use it all day (and at first mastering one language is more valuable than barely knowing two) and you won't have to switch languages in your head when you code. And communication between front and back will be in json ... Which is crazy close to javascript.

Alexander is right, if you go with PHP take your time first to do things by yourself like building your own MVC, the benefit is huge and the risk is to never really be able to understand what's happening on a deeper level. (at some point you can switch to a framework though). He's also right on choosing a strongly typed language, problem is javascript is not. This is why, if you choose node, when you start being confident, add typesccript.

Hope it helps, good luck

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Octavian Irimia
Recommends
PHP

Short answer, if it's a web project (and I guess it is) go with PHP and you can integrate NodeJs services later.

@adzaria (Ezra Fayet) gave a great answer and I'd like to emphasize the first part: As a beginner you need to understand concepts first. For me that means to understand the web, how servers and requests work, APIs and few others.

Now, I'd like to add few things so, this is the long answer:

Why PHP?

  • Everyone knows about the community - PHP is way older so you will find lots of resources and I am not only talking about learning - also lots of helpful tools and packages
  • PHP is great for OOP - not perfect, but with PHP7 got great - and if you are a beginner you want to know good OOP for your future. Let's say JavaScript's OOP is a bit strange; I will not get into details but, let's say "it's not by the book". You can still learn JavaScript for your front-end

Why not Python? Python got popular because of AI - don't use PHP for AI and don't use Python for web applications. I can elaborate a lot here but I guess you get the point.

Why not NodeJs?

  • NodeJs got popular because of sockets - and it works great, but as a service
  • Try to find a good and affordable hosting for NodeJs. How about for Python?
  • I would not ignore the security issues that it had and could appear. PHP is older and, therefore, wiser :)

Now, about a framework... is this a learning project or something that you need to do fast? My advice is to start a small project and not use any framework. However, you can use packages and inspire from a framework's architecture - Laravel is a good role model.

Why not start a big project? You will get distracted, get into details and product design stuff and get scared or border and abandon it. For your project you need an MVP - list of minimum required features that you put on paper - that you will complete. After that you can improve.

Good luck!

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somes kumar k
Member Technical Staff at Manage Engine, division of Zoho Corp · | 3 upvotes · 133.1K views
Recommends
Node.js

you can choose Node.js Here are my points

Node.js is build over chrome’s v8 and its works on non blocking io. Node.js have huge community and great packages (npm) to help you out in most cases and makes development faster Node.js has been adopted by many multi dollar company Hope this helps😊

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Recommends
Python
Django

I have used Laravel, but with Django you can develop faster, as authentication and admin panel are configured out of the box. It users SQLite by default and you won't have to worry about the database in the begginning

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Alexander Santos
Fullstack Developer at 3CON · | 2 upvotes · 128.9K views
Recommends
PHP

The reason why i chose PHP is the amount of content you can find on the internet easily. As you quoted being a beginner, i think a more mature language would be better. And that's also another reason for following with PHP.

Python is simple and "mature", but it can be a bit hard to understand if you are a beginner. Python relies on heavy abstraction, and that's the reason behind it's simplicity. Python is an "easy to play, hard to master" language, i never recommend it to beginners. Also, one [maybe personal] reason why i don't like to use Python as back-end is: Python is very data-focused. So if your app has focus on business logic, Python wouldn't fit very well. And with that becomes an advantage, if your app has statistical focus, being data-focused or something like that, Python has huge advantage among all other languages due to many great tools the community has built.

About Node, it's like PHP, but less mature. It's as easy as PHP to find tools that can help you, for example, to abstract the database-connection's logic. But to find architectural-focused content, more advanced concepts, it's a lot harder. While that, Laravel's community, for example, has a lot of materials that involves those concepts.

Still, if you are really a beginner, i don't recommend using Laravel with PHP. Do things on plain PHP first, understand the reason behind using frameworks and Laravel's motivation.

Also, consider a strong-typed language first, those are considered more didatic, but less flexible.

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You cannot choose between Python | PHP | NodeJS Since they are entirely for Different purpose.

In Bird view

Python - Large Scale Projects and if you want a job in big IT company.

Node.JS - Huge computing projects and if you want job in Silicon valley startup.

PHP - Cost Effective and If you want start a business in near future.

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Tarun Batra
Back End Developer at instabox · | 2 upvotes · 121.6K views
Recommends
Python
Django

Python, PHP and Node.js all are capable of being used to create good complex software. There are many examples of similar applications built on all of them. If I have to pick one, I would say consider Python and Django. It is fairly easy to develop web applications on top of this stack. Scaling and maintaining the application should also not be a problem given a lot of resources are available online.

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Kamal Makroum
Needs advice
on
React
Python
and
Java

Hi everyone.

I am willing to build a used car sales platform, which will have a lot of stock/photos and will rely a lot on the back end functions and data generating. Java seems to be a good choice, but what other options can I consider that can also be easily scalable as well as a little faster to write?

Thank you

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Replies (2)
Ruslan Rayanov
Recommends

Hi, Kamal! I don't know if your question is still relevant. But I would like to introduce you to our solution, perhaps it will be useful for future projects. We have developed a web application constructor that can be used to create almost any website or application https://falconspace.site/. The entire development stack is reduced to SQL only. The platform is easy to configure and make subsequent changes if necessary.

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Recommends

Firstly, you must know that java and python are both amazing languages. But I recommend python mainly because of the variety of modules and packages available to do almost anything. If you are planning on adding graphs, you can use the matplotlib library and to add photos, use the pillow module. And just note that both of these aren't available by default, so you need to install them through pip.

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Needs advice
on
Rust
Python
and
JavaScript

So, I've been working with all 3 languages JavaScript, Python and Rust, I know that all of these languages are important in their own domain but, I haven't took any of it to the point where i could say I'm a pro at any of these languages. I learned JS and Python out of my own excitement, I learned rust for some IoT based projects. just confused which one i should invest my time in first... that does have Job and freelance potential in market as well...

I am an undergraduate in computer science. (3rd Year)

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Replies (3)
Recommends
JavaScript

I would start focusing on Javascript because even working with Rust and Python, you're always going to encounter some Javascript for front-ends at least. It has: - more freelancing opportunities (starting to work short after a virus/crisis, that's gonna help) - can also do back-end if needed (I would personally avoid specializing in this since there's better languages for the back-end part) - hard to avoid. it's everywhere and not going away (well not yet)

Then, later, for back-end programming languages, Rust seems like your best bet. Its pros: - it's satisfying to work with (after the learning curve) - it's got potential to grow big in the next year (also with better paying jobs) - it's super versatile (you can do high-perf system stuff, graphics, ffi, as well as your classic api server) It comes with a few cons though: - it's harder to learn (expect to put in years) - the freelancing options are virtually non-existent (and I would expect them to stay limited, as rust is better for long-term software than prototypes)

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Recommends
JavaScript

I suggest you to go with JavaScript. From my perspective JavaScript is the language you should invest your time in. The community of javascript and lots of framework helps developer to build what they want to build in no time whether it a desktop, web, mobile based application or even you can use javascript as a backend as well. There are lot of frameworks you can start learning i suggest you to go with (react,vue) library both are easy to learn than angular which is a complete framework.

And if you want to go with python as a secondary tool then i suggest you to learn a python framework (Flask,Django).

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Moinul Moin
Recommends
JavaScript

go for javascript, brother.

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Needs advice
on
Python
and
JSON

Hi. Currently, I have a requirement where I have to create a new JSON file based on the input CSV file, validate the generated JSON file, and upload the JSON file into the application (which runs in AWS) using API. Kindly suggest the best language that can meet the above requirement. I feel Python will be better, but I am not sure with the justification of why python. Can you provide your views on this?

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Replies (3)
Recommends
Python

Python is very flexible and definitely up the job (although, in reality, any language will be able to cope with this task!). Python has some good libraries built in, and also some third party libraries that will help here. 1. Convert CSV -> JSON 2. Validate against a schema 3. Deploy to AWS

  1. The builtins include json and csv libraries, and, depending on the complexity of the csv file, it is fairly simple to convert:
import csv
import json

with open("your_input.csv", "r") as f:
    csv_as_dict = list(csv.DictReader(f))[0]

with open("your_output.json", "w") as f:
    json.dump(csv_as_dict, f)
  1. The validation part is handled nicely by this library: https://pypi.org/project/jsonschema/ It allows you to create a schema and check whether what you have created works for what you want to do. It is based on the json schema standard, allowing annotation and validation of any json

  2. It as an AWS library to automate the upload - or in fact do pretty much anything with AWS - from within your codebase: https://aws.amazon.com/sdk-for-python/ This will handle authentication to AWS and uploading / deploying the file to wherever it needs to go.

A lot depends on the last two pieces, but the converting itself is really pretty neat.

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Recommends
Go

I would use Go. Since CSV files are flat (no hierarchy), you could use the encoding/csv package to read each row, and write out the values as JSON. See https://medium.com/@ankurraina/reading-a-simple-csv-in-go-36d7a269cecd. You just have to figure out in advance what the key is for each row.

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Max Musing
Founder & CEO at BaseDash · | 1 upvotes · 116.9K views
Recommends
Node.js
at

This should be pretty doable in any language. Go with whatever you're most familiar with.

That being said, there's a case to be made for using Node.js since it's trivial to convert an object to JSON and vice versa.

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Needs advice
on
Python
Lua
and
Java

I am trying to make Roblox game which requires Lua. I quite don't want to go with Lua just because other tools just might let me do more projects later on. I heard that Python is most similar to Lua, but I am still not sure which tool to use. Java, I think it will help me with many stuff later on for websites, projects, and more!

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Replies (1)
Rafey Iqbal Rahman
Recommends
Lua
at

Since you are trying to make a Roblox game, you have no other option than to use Lua, since Roblox only allows coding in Lua. Yes, you've heard right, Python is identical and as easy as Lua, although Lua is easier than Python. Beginning from Lua and then escalating to Python is recommended. Java is only helpful when you are creating a heavy, big-budget, enterprise-level product, otherwise, Python would suffice.

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Needs advice
on
Python
PHP
and
Java

Hi everyone, I have just started to study web development, so I'm very new in this field. I would like to ask you which tools are most updated and good to use for getting a job in medium-big company. Front-end is basically not changing by time so much (as I understood by researching some info), so my question is about back-end tools. Which backend tools are most updated and requested by medium-big companies (I am searching for immediate job possibly)?

Thank you in advance Davit

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Replies (4)
Pierrick Martos
Engineering Manager at Akeneo · | 20 upvotes · 80.3K views
Recommends
Python

Go with Python definetly. It's used everywhere by web developers for backend developments : API, website backend, workers... but also by data scientists (lot lot of resources, models and libraries in Python it's language #1). For the web parts, best web framework are in Python : https://stackshare.io/microframeworks (Flask #2 and Django #3). Java is good but trend is not great in terms of popularity amongs developers and tech leaders.

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Vijayakumar Rajagopal
Recommends
Java

As per my experience java is most wanted for web development as of now. micro service is evolving . with frameworks like spring boot supports rapid development. Spring boot + Docker + kubernetes great combination.

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sharik zama
Software engineering Intern at EPAM Systems · | 5 upvotes · 79.6K views
Recommends
JavaScript

I would recommend learning HTML, CSS, and JavaScript (most important). JavaScript forms the backbone of web development. And, there are many popular and widely used frameworks like Angular and React that heavily rely on the knowledge of JavaScript. The number of job opportunities are much more when it comes to javascript.

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Chathuranga Bandara
Recommends
Python

I would recommend Python as the programming language and as you are a new developer, Flask to start with. It gives you a solid understanding on the web patterns such as REST and will get you up and running in no time. However, I suggest you to read and study on front-end technologies like (React or Vue) and databases (SQL and NoSQL) and probably some NodeJS as well. First grasp the concepts (which Python is ideal for) then it does not really matter the language as such.

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Needs advice
on
React Native
Python
and
Go

I've been juggling with an app idea and am clueless about how to build it.

A little about the app:

  • Social network type app ,
  • Users can create different directories, in those directories post images and/or text that'll be shared on a public dashboard .

Directory creation is the main point of this app. Besides there'll be rooms(groups),chatting system, search operations similar to instagram,push notifications

I have two options:

  1. React Native, Python, AWS stack or
  2. Flutter, Go ( I don't know what stack or tools to use)
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Replies (6)
George Krachtopoulos
Recommends
Python

Currently, I have decided to use Python and JavaScript (especially React and Node.js) for any of my projects. Well, I have used Python with Django for a lot of things, and I would certainly recommend Django to anyone, due to its high secure authentication and authorization inbuilt system, a ready to use admin platform, template tags, and many more. Well, I guess that you would like to use Python to create the backend of your application, an API, and React Native for the frontend. Python and JavaScript (React) are on the trend these days and have a huge community, so there are many resources, tutorials, great documentation. I have not really heard anyone using Flutter and Go for applications these days, so I would not recommend it to you, it would make your life much more difficult.

Hope that helps, and good luck with your project!

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Tony Chong
Principal & Founder at Airwave Tech · | 6 upvotes · 78.4K views
Recommends
Flutter

I'm typically agnostic when it comes to picking languages. Whatever gets the job done, but, in this case, to figure out what's involved with what you want to do, it's going to be much more than just picking programming languages for your client and backend interfaces.

So, I'm recommending you use Flutter+Firebase as a way to figure out what you need to get done. It supports both iOS and Android out of the box, introduces you to a bunch of components you will need to think about in the future (whether you stick with Firebase or not), and the key here, is that there are tons of articles, youtube videos, and other courses you can take to pick it up pretty quickly. You could even clone an Instagram knockoff from github. Guess what else, it's all free. You might not need to worry as much about the backend since there are client libraries for Flutter/Dart for Firebase.

Some might have different opinions, and like I said, I'm usually agnostic, but in this case, you have a lot to consider. Where are you going to store the data? Are people going to need to login? Will there but customized settings the will save even if I close the app? Yeah, that's just a few questions.

Those are just a few. Lots to consider, so if you want to get something in your hand as soon as possible, try a search for flutter + firebase + chat + Instagram or something like that and have a look.

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Recommends
React Native

If this is for learning about how to design the system, then pick the tools are you are confortable with.

Often times, I get stuck picking the tools (and trying to learn about them) vs actually trying to design the system itself.

If you are familiar with React (check out Expo) and Django then I would recommend going with that.

For deploying your backend, I would go with a provider like https://zeit.co/ that automates a whole bunch of deployment steps with their cli tools that you might have to do with AWS.

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Emmanuel Kayode
Software Engineer at Teamapt Ltd · | 3 upvotes · 77K views
Recommends
Go

The above listed tools will do the job, you just need to figure out your architecture(e.g models). How they will all connect. Then you can use a tool you are comfortable with to implement them.

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Charles Nelson
Recommends
Python

What you need to take a look at is Apache OpenMeetings. It already does what you want, it is open source and well documented and only requires that you design the UI and plumbing required to serve you application.

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Adam Ha
Recommends
React Native

Let's select right tool you feel you are good at. And selecting tools are used by large community to solve your stuck if encounter

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Needs advice
on
Python
JavaScript
and
Go

We are converting AWS Lambdas from Java due to excessive cold start times. Usage: These lambdas handle XML and JSON payloads, they use s3, API Gateway, RDS, DynamoDB, and external API's. Most of our developers are only experienced in java. These three languages (Go, Node.js, and Python) were discussed, but no consensus has been reached yet.

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Replies (5)
Jordan Gregory
Sr. Software Engineer at Granular · | 4 upvotes · 109.3K views
Recommends
Go

I've worked with all three of these languages and also with Java developers converting to these languages and far and away Go is the easier one to convert to. With the improved cold-start times and the ease of conversion for a Java developer, it is a no-brainer for me.

The hardest part of the conversion though is going to be the lack of traditional Classes so you have to be mindful of that, but Go Structs and interfaces tend to make up for what is lost there.

Full Disclosure: I'm a 95% Go convert (from Python) at this point in time.

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Ahmet Yildirim
Software Engineering Consultant at UXCraft Sweden AB · | 3 upvotes · 109.3K views
Recommends
Go

Although I am primarily a Javascript developer myself, I used Go to build AWS lambda in a similar scenario to yours. AWS libraries felt better integrated on the Go side, I believe due to the language itself (e.g. how JSON objects are handled in go). Besides that performance of Go is much superior. But on the cons side; community is far smaller around Go, compared to Javascript. That is easy notice if you look at repos of community-maintained libraries for Go. That can feel a bit unreliable.

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Jason Scheirer
Senior Software Engineer at EasyPost · | 2 upvotes · 109K views
Recommends
Go

Go would provide the easiest transition for Java programmers -- its IDE/tooling is second to none (just install Goland) and the deploy/distribution story is extremely clean and lends itself to work well in lambda: single, static binaries with quick startup. No need to set up a full environment or package dependencies on your lambda AMIs, just copy a file.

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Russel Werner
Lead Engineer at StackShare · | 1 upvotes · 109K views

If you want to prioritise language familiarity, JavaScript is more like Java than the other choices; and it can be optimised to run very fast. However if you need really fast cold-start times, you can't beat Go since it's compiled. There are other things to consider, such as the massive amount of community packages and help/documentation in the JavaScript ecosystem. Go is newer but seems to be quite popular if you need something that runs fast in a single binary.

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Paul Whittemore
Developer and Owner at Appurist Software · | 1 upvotes · 109K views
Recommends
Go

I was initially going to suggest JavaScript due to the smaller size needs of AWS Lambdas code and the larger range of libraries and community available (and to avoid Python for this). But I have to agree with the recommendations and rationale of @ayildirim above and I think you should choose any reasonable language that is low-overhead, fast startup, and best supported by AWS Lambda, and that is probably Go. I don't think you are likely to go wrong with that, while you can potentially with the others.

So I'd agree, on the strength of AWS Lambda support and the solid performance of Go, it seems like your best choice here for Lambdas (and I'm going to need to consider that myself going forward... pardon the pun).

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Decisions about Pharo and Python
awesomebanana2018

1. Type safety and inferred types

Go is type safe by default, which allows you to right more reliable code and have better developer tooling, plus with the := operator, you can initialize a variable without having to define its type because it automatically gets its type from the initial value.

2. Performance

There isn't much to be said here, but on most counts go beats both Python and Node.js on performance.

3. Documentation

I'm not talking about the Go language itself, although it does have good docs. I'm talking about Go's auto generated documentation tool, which allows people to document their packages easily and works amazingly with Go's type system.

4. Compiles to binary

If you are making a local program for somebody and they don't want to download the Go compiler, you can make Go into a native binary.

5. Built for the web

Go has built in Http libraries to rival Express.js and has a HTML/Text templating system.

6. Great Concurrency

Go utilizes Goroutines to help developers utilize multiple threads easily.

Conclusion

Go is an excellent choice for any system code, especially http networking and web backends.

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Kyle Harrison
Web Application Developer at Fortinet · | 17 upvotes · 161K views

Node continues to be dominant force in the world of web apps, with it's signature async first non-blocking IO, and frankly mind bending speeds. PHP and Python are formable tools, I chose Node for the simplicity of Express as a good and performant server side API gateway platform, that works well with Angular.

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Octavian Irimia

Both PHP and Python are free but when it comes to web development PHP wins for sure. There is no doubt that Python is a powerful language but it is not optimal for web. PHP has issues... of course; but so does any other language.

Another reason I chose PHP is for community - it has one of the most resourceful communities from the internet and for a good reason: it evolved with the language itself.

The fact that OOP evolved so much in PHP makes me keep it for good :)

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Thomas Miller
Talent Co-Ordinator at Tessian · | 16 upvotes · 82.8K views

In December we successfully flipped around half a billion monthly API requests from our Ruby on Rails application to some new Python 3 applications. Our Head of Engineering has written a great article as to why we decided to transition from Ruby on Rails to Python 3! Read more about it in the link below.

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Ítalo Vietro
Chose
Python
over
Go
at

We decided to use python to write our ETLs and import them into metabase via a lambda. Before python we tried using Go, but overall go was way more verbose than Python when writing the ETLs. Go also had some issues managing memory when using the S3 upload manager library. This was a deal breaker for us that made us switch to Python.

In the end the solution was much cleaner and maintainable.

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Jordan Gregory
Sr. Software Engineer at Granular · | 3 upvotes · 9.4K views
Migrated
from
Python
to
Go

A number of years ago; I had done python for a long time prior to learning about Go. Most of what I wrote was system-like things and web-things in python, and I got tired of running into the lack-of-a-type-system problems that python gave me. I wanted to switch to a compiled, strongly-typed system that wasn't C/C++ (been there, done that, got the "shoot yourself in the foot" t-shirt). I looked into both Rust/Go, and for what I wanted to do (system/web) stuff ... at the time, Go was the strongest candidate, so I switched and never went back. Recently I started to re-look at Rust for system things, but for anything I do that I have to touch the web with, it will be Go from now on.

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We needed to incorporate Big Data Framework for data stream analysis, specifically Apache Spark / Apache Storm. The three options of languages were most suitable for the job - Python, Java, Scala.

The winner was Python for the top of the class, high-performance data analysis libraries (NumPy, Pandas) written in C, quick learning curve, quick prototyping allowance, and a great connection with other future tools for machine learning as Tensorflow.

The whole code was shorter & more readable which made it easier to develop and maintain.

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Mike Fiedler
Enterprise Architect at Warby Parker · | 3 upvotes · 52.9K views

When I was evaluating languages to write this app in, I considered either Python or JavaScript at the time. I find Ruby very pleasant to read and write, and the Ruby community has built out a wide variety of test tools and approaches, helping e deliver better software faster. Along with Rails, and the Ruby-first Heroku support, this was an easy decision.

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Kyle Harrison
Web Application Developer at Fortinet · | 2 upvotes · 8.7K views

The decision behind choosing a server side technology is never an easy one. Every single language has it's pro's and con's around each.

For me, this decision came down to a couple simple points: 1. Node is a web tech first class citizen, designed around handling web events, in a web technology world 2. Asynchronous

The thing about Python and Java is that they TOO can handle these, and handle these very well. Java for instance powers most of Twitter and Netflix's architecture. Where Python is what's behind giants like Instagram and Patreon. Certainly, you can't go wrong. Heck, Ruby powered GitHub and GitLab, and those things see HUGE traffic.

But this project is a web technology first. And node feels right at home as it itself is a web technology. This decision was more about homogeneous synergy than most anything else. I need it to be screaming fast, asynchronous, and play extremely well with web standards.

Node fits the bill on every front.

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Mohamed Hassan
Software Engineer at YottaHQ Inc. · | 4 upvotes · 27.2K views
Chose
PHP
over
Python
Go

PHP is easy to learn and you can get up and running in no time, available on almost all hosting providers and you can find developers easily. It has some great frameworks for building your backend like Symfony and Laravel. However, it can be challenging when running an enterprise and needs some adjustments, very recommended for starting a new project or startup.

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Pros of Pharo
Pros of Python
  • 3
    Purely object-oriented
  • 3
    Readable code
  • 3
    Image-based instead of source-file based
  • 3
    Great tooling
  • 3
    Dinamic live programming
  • 3
    Great syntax for anonymous functions (blocks)
  • 3
    Minimalist syntax
  • 3
    Programming in the debugger
  • 3
    Simple OOP
  • 3
    Great DSL capabilities
  • 2
    Interactive development
  • 2
    Great visualization tools
  • 2
    Great IDE
  • 2
    Open Source
  • 2
    Rapid development
  • 2
    Git integration out-of-the-box
  • 1
    Batteries included
  • 1
    Headless (CLI) support
  • 1.1K
    Great libraries
  • 933
    Readable code
  • 820
    Beautiful code
  • 770
    Rapid development
  • 673
    Large community
  • 419
    Open source
  • 379
    Elegant
  • 269
    Great community
  • 262
    Object oriented
  • 209
    Dynamic typing
  • 71
    Great standard library
  • 53
    Very fast
  • 50
    Functional programming
  • 36
    Scientific computing
  • 35
    Easy to learn
  • 31
    Great documentation
  • 25
    Matlab alternative
  • 23
    Productivity
  • 23
    Easy to read
  • 20
    Simple is better than complex
  • 18
    It's the way I think
  • 17
    Imperative
  • 15
    Very programmer and non-programmer friendly
  • 15
    Free
  • 14
    Powerful
  • 14
    Powerfull language
  • 13
    Fast and simple
  • 12
    Scripting
  • 11
    Machine learning support
  • 9
    Explicit is better than implicit
  • 8
    Unlimited power
  • 8
    Ease of development
  • 8
    Clear and easy and powerfull
  • 7
    Import antigravity
  • 6
    It's lean and fun to code
  • 6
    Print "life is short, use python"
  • 5
    Great for tooling
  • 5
    Fast coding and good for competitions
  • 5
    There should be one-- and preferably only one --obvious
  • 5
    Python has great libraries for data processing
  • 5
    High Documented language
  • 5
    I love snakes
  • 5
    Although practicality beats purity
  • 5
    Flat is better than nested
  • 4
    Readability counts
  • 3
    Rapid Prototyping
  • 3
    Socially engaged community
  • 3
    CG industry needs
  • 3
    Now is better than never
  • 3
    Great for analytics
  • 3
    Multiple Inheritence
  • 3
    Complex is better than complicated
  • 3
    Plotting
  • 3
    Beautiful is better than ugly
  • 3
    Lists, tuples, dictionaries
  • 2
    List comprehensions
  • 2
    Many types of collections
  • 2
    Ys
  • 2
    Easy to setup and run smooth
  • 2
    Generators
  • 2
    Special cases aren't special enough to break the rules
  • 2
    If the implementation is hard to explain, it's a bad id
  • 2
    If the implementation is easy to explain, it may be a g
  • 2
    Simple and easy to learn
  • 2
    Import this
  • 2
    No cruft
  • 2
    Easy to learn and use
  • 1
    Flexible and easy
  • 1
    Batteries included
  • 1
    Powerful language for AI
  • 1
    Should START with this but not STICK with This
  • 1
    Good
  • 1
    It is Very easy , simple and will you be love programmi
  • 1
    Better outcome
  • 1
    Web scraping
  • 1
    Because of Netflix
  • 1
    A-to-Z
  • 1
    Only one way to do it
  • 1
    Pip install everything
  • 0
    Powerful
  • 0
    Pro

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Cons of Pharo
Cons of Python
    Be the first to leave a con
    • 50
      Still divided between python 2 and python 3
    • 29
      Performance impact
    • 26
      Poor syntax for anonymous functions
    • 19
      Package management is a mess
    • 19
      GIL
    • 13
      Too imperative-oriented
    • 12
      Hard to understand
    • 11
      Dynamic typing
    • 9
      Very slow
    • 8
      Not everything is expression
    • 7
      Explicit self parameter in methods
    • 7
      Indentations matter a lot
    • 6
      Poor DSL capabilities
    • 6
      No anonymous functions
    • 6
      Requires C functions for dynamic modules
    • 5
      Threading
    • 5
      The "lisp style" whitespaces
    • 5
      Hard to obfuscate
    • 4
      Fake object-oriented programming
    • 4
      Incredibly slow
    • 4
      Lack of Syntax Sugar leads to "the pyramid of doom"
    • 4
      The benevolent-dictator-for-life quit
    • 3
      Official documentation is unclear.
    • 3
      Circular import
    • 3
      Not suitable for autocomplete
    • 1
      Training wheels (forced indentation)
    • 1
      Meta classes

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    - No public GitHub repository available -

    What is Pharo?

    A pure object-oriented programming language and a powerful environment, focused on simplicity and immediate feedback.

    What is Python?

    Python is a general purpose programming language created by Guido Van Rossum. Python is most praised for its elegant syntax and readable code, if you are just beginning your programming career python suits you best.

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    What companies use Python?
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    What tools integrate with Pharo?
    What tools integrate with Python?
      No integrations found

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      Blog Posts

      Sep 29 2020 at 7:36PM

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