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PHP vs Scala: What are the differences?

PHP: A popular general-purpose scripting language that is especially suited to web development. Fast, flexible and pragmatic, PHP powers everything from your blog to the most popular websites in the world; Scala: A pure-bred object-oriented language that runs on the JVM. Scala is an acronym for “Scalable Language”. This means that Scala grows with you. You can play with it by typing one-line expressions and observing the results. But you can also rely on it for large mission critical systems, as many companies, including Twitter, LinkedIn, or Intel do. To some, Scala feels like a scripting language. Its syntax is concise and low ceremony; its types get out of the way because the compiler can infer them.

PHP and Scala can be primarily classified as "Languages" tools.

"Large community", "Open source" and "Easy deployment" are the key factors why developers consider PHP; whereas "Static typing", "Jvm" and "Pattern-matching" are the primary reasons why Scala is favored.

PHP and Scala are both open source tools. It seems that PHP with 23.9K GitHub stars and 5.53K forks on GitHub has more adoption than Scala with 11.8K GitHub stars and 2.75K GitHub forks.

9GAG, Hootsuite, and 37 Signals are some of the popular companies that use PHP, whereas Scala is used by Twitter, 9GAG, and Asana. PHP has a broader approval, being mentioned in 8904 company stacks & 2933 developers stacks; compared to Scala, which is listed in 437 company stacks and 324 developer stacks.

What is PHP?

Fast, flexible and pragmatic, PHP powers everything from your blog to the most popular websites in the world.

What is Scala?

Scala is an acronym for “Scalable Language”. This means that Scala grows with you. You can play with it by typing one-line expressions and observing the results. But you can also rely on it for large mission critical systems, as many companies, including Twitter, LinkedIn, or Intel do. To some, Scala feels like a scripting language. Its syntax is concise and low ceremony; its types get out of the way because the compiler can infer them.
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What are some alternatives to PHP and Scala?
JavaScript
JavaScript is most known as the scripting language for Web pages, but used in many non-browser environments as well such as node.js or Apache CouchDB. It is a prototype-based, multi-paradigm scripting language that is dynamic,and supports object-oriented, imperative, and functional programming styles.
Python
Python is a general purpose programming language created by Guido Van Rossum. Python is most praised for its elegant syntax and readable code, if you are just beginning your programming career python suits you best.
Java
Java is a programming language and computing platform first released by Sun Microsystems in 1995. There are lots of applications and websites that will not work unless you have Java installed, and more are created every day. Java is fast, secure, and reliable. From laptops to datacenters, game consoles to scientific supercomputers, cell phones to the Internet, Java is everywhere!
HTML5
HTML5 is a core technology markup language of the Internet used for structuring and presenting content for the World Wide Web. As of October 2014 this is the final and complete fifth revision of the HTML standard of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). The previous version, HTML 4, was standardised in 1997.
Node.js
Node.js uses an event-driven, non-blocking I/O model that makes it lightweight and efficient, perfect for data-intensive real-time applications that run across distributed devices.
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Decisions about PHP and Scala
Antonio Sanchez
Antonio Sanchez
CEO at Kokoen GmbH · | 11 upvotes · 89K views
atKokoen GmbHKokoen GmbH
ExpressJS
ExpressJS
Node.js
Node.js
JavaScript
JavaScript
MongoDB
MongoDB
Go
Go
MySQL
MySQL
Laravel
Laravel
PHP
PHP

Back at the start of 2017, we decided to create a web-based tool for the SEO OnPage analysis of our clients' websites. We had over 2.000 websites to analyze, so we had to perform thousands of requests to get every single page from those websites, process the information and save the big amounts of data somewhere.

Very soon we realized that the initial chosen script language and database, PHP, Laravel and MySQL, was not going to be able to cope efficiently with such a task.

By that time, we were doing some experiments for other projects with a language we had recently get to know, Go , so we decided to get a try and code the crawler using it. It was fantastic, we could process much more data with way less CPU power and in less time. By using the concurrency abilites that the language has to offers, we could also do more Http requests in less time.

Unfortunately, I have no comparison numbers to show about the performance differences between Go and PHP since the difference was so clear from the beginning and that we didn't feel the need to do further comparison tests nor document it. We just switched fully to Go.

There was still a problem: despite the big amount of Data we were generating, MySQL was performing very well, but as we were adding more and more features to the software and with those features more and more different type of data to save, it was a nightmare for the database architects to structure everything correctly on the database, so it was clear what we had to do next: switch to a NoSQL database. So we switched to MongoDB, and it was also fantastic: we were expending almost zero time in thinking how to structure the Database and the performance also seemed to be better, but again, I have no comparison numbers to show due to the lack of time.

We also decided to switch the website from PHP and Laravel to JavaScript and Node.js and ExpressJS since working with the JSON Data that we were saving now in the Database would be easier.

As of now, we don't only use the tool intern but we also opened it for everyone to use for free: https://tool-seo.com

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Gev Balyan
Gev Balyan
Founder at UCRAFT · | 3 upvotes · 18.7K views
atUCRAFTUCRAFT
PHP
PHP
MySQL
MySQL
Composer
Composer
Ember.js
Ember.js
JavaScript
JavaScript
Laravel
Laravel

We recently decided to rewrite Ucraft's Laravel from scratch.

The goal is to make everything more Laravel friendly that will speak to frontend JavaScript , built on Ember.js via JSON Patch standard. This will also make out app better extendible and overridable.

The namespeaces are going to be more correct and the app itself will be compatible with Composer packages.

This also improves the connection between MySQL and PHP making the reoccurring MySQL queries cached during the lifecycle.

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Marc Bollinger
Marc Bollinger
Infra & Data Eng Manager at Lumosity · | 4 upvotes · 61.2K views
atLumosityLumosity
Pulsar
Pulsar
Redis
Redis
Heron
Heron
Apache Storm
Apache Storm
Scala
Scala
Kafka
Kafka
Ruby
Ruby
Node.js
Node.js

Lumosity is home to the world's largest cognitive training database, a responsibility we take seriously. For most of the company's history, our analysis of user behavior and training data has been powered by an event stream--first a simple Node.js pub/sub app, then a heavyweight Ruby app with stronger durability. Both supported decent throughput and latency, but they lacked some major features supported by existing open-source alternatives: replaying existing messages (also lacking in most message queue-based solutions), scaling out many different readers for the same stream, the ability to leverage existing solutions for reading and writing, and possibly most importantly: the ability to hire someone externally who already had expertise.

We ultimately migrated to Kafka in early- to mid-2016, citing both industry trends in companies we'd talked to with similar durability and throughput needs, the extremely strong documentation and community. We pored over Kyle Kingsbury's Jepsen post (https://aphyr.com/posts/293-jepsen-Kafka), as well as Jay Kreps' follow-up (http://blog.empathybox.com/post/62279088548/a-few-notes-on-kafka-and-jepsen), talked at length with Confluent folks and community members, and still wound up running parallel systems for quite a long time, but ultimately, we've been very, very happy. Understanding the internals and proper levers takes some commitment, but it's taken very little maintenance once configured. Since then, the Confluent Platform community has grown and grown; we've gone from doing most development using custom Scala consumers and producers to being 60/40 Kafka Streams/Connects.

We originally looked into Storm / Heron , and we'd moved on from Redis pub/sub. Heron looks great, but we already had a programming model across services that was more akin to consuming a message consumers than required a topology of bolts, etc. Heron also had just come out while we were starting to migrate things, and the community momentum and direction of Kafka felt more substantial than the older Storm. If we were to start the process over again today, we might check out Pulsar , although the ecosystem is much younger.

To find out more, read our 2017 engineering blog post about the migration!

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Ajit Parthan
Ajit Parthan
CTO at Shaw Academy · | 3 upvotes · 5.2K views
atShaw AcademyShaw Academy
Python
Python
PHP
PHP
#Etl

Multiple systems means there is a requirement to cart data across them.

Started off with Talend scripts. This was great as what we initially had were PHP/Python script - allowed for a more systematic approach to ETL.

But ended up with a massive repository of scripts, complex crontab entries and regular failures due to memory issues.

Using Stitch or similar services is a better approach: - no need to worry about the infrastructure needed for the ETL processes - a more formal mapping of data from source to destination as opposed to script developer doing his/her voodoo magic - lot of common sources and destination integrations are already builtin and out of the box

etl @{etlasaservice}|topic:1323|

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SVN (Subversion)
SVN (Subversion)
Git
Git
JSON
JSON
XML
XML
Python
Python
PHP
PHP
Java
Java
Swift
Swift
JavaScript
JavaScript
Linux
Linux
GitHub
GitHub
Visual Studio Code
Visual Studio Code

I use Visual Studio Code because at this time is a mature software and I can do practically everything using it.

  • It's free and open source: The project is hosted on GitHub and it’s free to download, fork, modify and contribute to the project.

  • Multi-platform: You can download binaries for different platforms, included Windows (x64), MacOS and Linux (.rpm and .deb packages)

  • LightWeight: It runs smoothly in different devices. It has an average memory and CPU usage. Starts almost immediately and it’s very stable.

  • Extended language support: Supports by default the majority of the most used languages and syntax like JavaScript, HTML, C#, Swift, Java, PHP, Python and others. Also, VS Code supports different file types associated to projects like .ini, .properties, XML and JSON files.

  • Integrated tools: Includes an integrated terminal, debugger, problem list and console output inspector. The project navigator sidebar is simple and powerful: you can manage your files and folders with ease. The command palette helps you find commands by text. The search widget has a powerful auto-complete feature to search and find your files.

  • Extensible and configurable: There are many extensions available for every language supported, including syntax highlighters, IntelliSense and code completion, and debuggers. There are also extension to manage application configuration and architecture like Docker and Jenkins.

  • Integrated with Git: You can visually manage your project repositories, pull, commit and push your changes, and easy conflict resolution.( there is support for SVN (Subversion) users by plugin)

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Alex A
Alex A
Founder at PRIZ Guru · | 3 upvotes · 48.5K views
atPRIZ GuruPRIZ Guru
Gradle
Gradle
Groovy
Groovy
Scala
Scala
Play
Play
Grails
Grails

Some may wonder why did we choose Grails ? Really good question :) We spent quite some time to evaluate what framework to go with and the battle was between Play Scala and Grails ( Groovy ). We have enough experience with both and, to be honest, I absolutely in love with Scala; however, the tipping point for us was the potential speed of development. Grails allows much faster development pace than Play , and as of right now this is the most important parameter. We might convert later though. Also, worth mentioning, by default Grails comes with Gradle as a build tool, so why change?

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Ajit Parthan
Ajit Parthan
CTO at Shaw Academy · | 1 upvotes · 4K views
atShaw AcademyShaw Academy
Python
Python
PHP
PHP

Multiple systems means there is a requirement to cart data across them.

Started off with Talend scripts. This was great as what we initially had were PHP/Python script - allowed for a more systematic approach to ETL.

But ended up with a massive repository of scripts, complex crontab entries and regular failures due to memory issues.

Using Stitch or similar services is a better approach: - no need to worry about the infrastructure needed for the ETL processes - a more formal mapping of data from source to destination as opposed to script developer doing his/her voodoo magic - lot of common sources and destination integrations are already builtin and out of the box

See more
Epistol
Epistol
PHP
PHP
Bulma
Bulma
Asana
Asana
Stripe
Stripe
Let's Encrypt
Let's Encrypt
CloudFlare
CloudFlare
Deployer
Deployer
Git
Git
GitHub
GitHub
Ubuntu
Ubuntu
nginx
nginx
Buddy
Buddy
Webpack
Webpack
Vue.js
Vue.js
JavaScript
JavaScript
HTML5
HTML5
Sass
Sass
Google Analytics
Google Analytics
PhpStorm
PhpStorm
Laravel
Laravel
#CDG
CDG

I use Laravel because it's the most advances PHP framework out there, easy to maintain, easy to upgrade and most of all : easy to get a handle on, and to follow every new technology ! PhpStorm is our main software to code, as of simplicity and full range of tools for a modern application.

Google Analytics Analytics of course for a tailored analytics, Bulma as an innovative CSS framework, coupled with our Sass (Scss) pre-processor.

As of more basic stuff, we use HTML5, JavaScript (but with Vue.js too) and Webpack to handle the generation of all this.

To deploy, we set up Buddy to easily send the updates on our nginx / Ubuntu server, where it will connect to our GitHub Git private repository, pull and do all the operations needed with Deployer .

CloudFlare ensure the rapidity of distribution of our content, and Let's Encrypt the https certificate that is more than necessary when we'll want to sell some products with our Stripe api calls.

Asana is here to let us list all the functionalities, possibilities and ideas we want to implement.

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Vadim Bakaev
Vadim Bakaev
Scala
Scala
Haskell
Haskell

Why I am using Haskell in my free time?

I have 3 reasons for it. I am looking for:

Fun.

Improve functional programming skill.

Improve problem-solving skill.

Laziness and mathematical abstractions behind Haskell makes it a wonderful language.

It is Pure functional, it helps me to write better Scala code.

Highly expressive language gives elegant ways to solve coding puzzle.

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Lidiexy Alonso
Lidiexy Alonso
Senior Software Engineer at Palinode LLC · | 6 upvotes · 7.8K views
JavaScript
JavaScript
Visual Studio Code
Visual Studio Code
PHP
PHP
PhpStorm
PhpStorm
React Native
React Native
#IDE

As developer at Applied Health Analytics we decided to create a React Native App. In terms of #IDE I'm a good fan of PhpStorm cause we have a lost of PHP in the backend, but I definitely gave a try to Visual Studio Code and now is my primary JavaScript #IDE. I was impress how fast VS Code has become the No.1 @JavaScript Editor in the community.

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Tom Klein
Tom Klein
CEO at Gentlent · | 4 upvotes · 30.3K views
atGentlentGentlent
Python
Python
Electron
Electron
Socket.IO
Socket.IO
Google Compute Engine
Google Compute Engine
TypeScript
TypeScript
ES6
ES6
Ubuntu
Ubuntu
PostgreSQL
PostgreSQL
React
React
nginx
nginx
Sass
Sass
HTML5
HTML5
PHP
PHP
Node.js
Node.js
JavaScript
JavaScript

Our most used programming languages are JavaScript / Node.js for it's lightweight and fast use, PHP because everyone knows it, HTML5 because you can't live without it and Sass to write great CSS. Occasionally, we use nginx as a web server and proxy, React for our UX, PostgreSQL as fast relational database, Ubuntu as server OS, ES6 and TypeScript for Node, Google Compute Engine for our infrastructure, and Socket.IO and Electron for specific use cases. We also use Python for some of our backends.

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Labinator Team
Labinator Team
at Labinator · | 13 upvotes · 71.1K views
atLabinatorLabinator
Debian
Debian
Manjaro
Manjaro
Visual Studio Code
Visual Studio Code
Sublime Text
Sublime Text
WordPress
WordPress
PHP
PHP
Vanilla.JS
Vanilla.JS
Sass
Sass
CSS 3
CSS 3
HTML5
HTML5

At labinator.com, we use HTML5, CSS 3, Sass, Vanilla.JS and PHP when building our premium WordPress themes and plugins. When writing our codes, we use Sublime Text and Visual Studio Code depending on the project. We run Manjaro and Debian operating systems in our office. Manjaro is a great desktop operating system for all range of tasks while Debian is a solid choice for servers.

WordPress became a very popular choice when it comes to content management systems and building websites. It is easy to learn and has a great community behind it. The high number of plugins as well that are available for WordPress allows any user to customize it depending on his/her needs.

For development, HTML5 with Sass is our go-to choice when building our themes.

Main Advantages Of Sass:

  • It's CSS syntax friendly
  • It offers variables
  • It uses a nested syntax
  • It includes mixins
  • Great community and online support.
  • Great documentation that is easy to read and follow.

As for PHP, we always thrive to use PHP 7.3+. After the introduction of PHP 7, the WordPress development process became more stable and reliable than before. If you a developer considering PHP 7.3+ for your project, it would be good to note the following benefits.

The Benefits Of Using PHP:

  • Open Source.
  • Highly Extendible.
  • Easy to learn and read.
  • Platform independent.
  • Compatible with APACHE.
  • Low development and maintenance cost.
  • Great community and support.
  • Detailed documentation that has everything you need!

Why PHP 7.3+?

  • Flexible Heredoc & Nowdoc Syntaxes - Two key methods for defining strings within PHP. They also became easier to read and more reliable.
  • A good boost in performance speed which is extremely important when it comes to WordPress development.
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Tassanai Singprom
Tassanai Singprom
Slack
Slack
BrowserStack
BrowserStack
Sentry
Sentry
Kibana
Kibana
Visual Studio Code
Visual Studio Code
npm
npm
GitLab
GitLab
GitHub
GitHub
Git
Git
Elasticsearch
Elasticsearch
Postman
Postman
Google Analytics
Google Analytics
MariaDB
MariaDB
GraphQL
GraphQL
Amazon RDS
Amazon RDS
Lumen
Lumen
Laravel
Laravel
Firebase
Firebase
Vue.js
Vue.js
Sass
Sass
Ubuntu
Ubuntu
Amazon EC2
Amazon EC2
Redis
Redis
jQuery
jQuery
HTML5
HTML5
PHP
PHP
JavaScript
JavaScript

This is my stack in Application & Data

JavaScript PHP HTML5 jQuery Redis Amazon EC2 Ubuntu Sass Vue.js Firebase Laravel Lumen Amazon RDS GraphQL MariaDB

My Utilities Tools

Google Analytics Postman Elasticsearch

My Devops Tools

Git GitHub GitLab npm Visual Studio Code Kibana Sentry BrowserStack

My Business Tools

Slack

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Ali Soueidan
Ali Soueidan
Creative Web Developer at Ali Soueidan · | 16 upvotes · 95.1K views
npm
npm
Babel
Babel
PHP
PHP
Adobe Illustrator
Adobe Illustrator
Asana
Asana
ES6
ES6
GitHub
GitHub
Git
Git
JSON
JSON
Sass
Sass
Pug
Pug
JavaScript
JavaScript
vuex
vuex
Vue.js
Vue.js

Application and Data: Since my personal website ( https://alisoueidan.com ) is a SPA I've chosen to use Vue.js, as a framework to create it. After a short skeptical phase I immediately felt in love with the single file component concept! I also used vuex for state management, which makes working with several components, which are communicating with each other even more fun and convenient to use. Of course, using Vue requires using JavaScript as well, since it is the basis of it.

For markup and style, I used Pug and Sass, since they’re the perfect match to me. I love the clean and strict syntax of both of them and even more that their structure is almost similar. Also, both of them come with an expanded functionality such as mixins, loops and so on related to their “siblings” (HTML and CSS). Both of them require nesting and prevent untidy code, which can be a huge advantage when working in teams. I used JSON to store data (since the data quantity on my website is moderate) – JSON works also good in combo with Pug, using for loops, based on the JSON Objects for example.

To send my contact form I used PHP, since sending emails using PHP is still relatively convenient, simple and easy done.

DevOps: Of course, I used Git to do my version management (which I even do in smaller projects like my website just have an additional backup of my code). On top of that I used GitHub since it now supports private repository for free accounts (which I am using for my own). I use Babel to use ES6 functionality such as arrow functions and so on, and still don’t losing cross browser compatibility.

Side note: I used npm for package management. 🎉

*Business Tools: * I use Asana to organize my project. This is a big advantage to me, even if I work alone, since “private” projects can get interrupted for some time. By using Asana I still know (even after month of not touching a project) what I’ve done, on which task I was at last working on and what still is to do. Working in Teams (for enterprise I’d take on Jira instead) of course Asana is a Tool which I really love to use as well. All the graphics on my website are SVG which I have created with Adobe Illustrator and adjusted within the SVG code or by using JavaScript or CSS (SASS).

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John Datserakis
John Datserakis
Node.js
Node.js
PHP
PHP
Go
Go

For the backend of https://www.rsvpkeeper.com I went with Go.

My past few project have been built with Go and I'm really loving it. It was my first statically typed language after many years with PHP and Node.js - and honestly I couldn't be happier to have made the switch.

The biggest thing for me, is that with the forced declaration of types - it's made me feel like I've made a more solid backend. Sometimes with PHP I felt like a stiff breeze could knock the whole thing down. I know that's an exaggeration - but it's kinda how it feels.

Anyways, everyone knows that it almost doesn't even matter what an app is actually made with - what really matters are the design decisions you make a long the way.

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Interest over time
Reviews of PHP and Scala
Review ofPHPPHP

source: w3techs.com

Rants about PHP are everywhere, but during the last years the language and the whole ecosystem has evolved.

The lastest versions support namespaces, closures, traits, generators and with composer a dependency manager that changed the way PHP developers work and collaborate.

How developers use PHP and Scala
Avatar of datapile
datapile uses ScalaScala

Scala is the God of languages. A legend. The Mount Rushmore of hybrid OO/functional languages is Scala's face four times over.

Ok, honestly, we love Scala. We love(d) Java (and it's parents C and C++), and we love(d) all the languages that borrowed cough stole cough from Java over the years such as Groovy, Clojure, and C#.

It may not be perfect (it totally is, but since programming languages don't have egos of their own, we don't want to paint it too bright), but it is awesome. It runs on the JVM, you can utilize Spring, it works great for data processing (which is sorta kinda the thing we do here, folks), and it just makes sense at all levels.

If you don't like Scala, we feel sorry for the projects that are suffering due to your choices, meanwhile we are using Scala to write everything from JavaScript, CSS, SQL, and JSON directly within itself (go figure), so in the end no one will know the beauty of this powerhouse language (except for our engineers, of course).

Avatar of Foursquare
Foursquare uses ScalaScala

Nearly our entire server codebase is written in Scala (if you haven't heard of it, it's a programming language that is basically what you would get if Java + ML had a baby). This has worked out super well. It enables us to write concise easy to deal with code that is typechecked at compile time. It's also been a big help with recruiting.

Avatar of Vladislav Moshynec
Vladislav Moshynec uses PHPPHP

Use the ipwhois.io IP lookup API to quickly and simply integrate IP geolocation into your script or website. Save yourself the hassle of setting up local GeoIP libraries and having to remember to regularly update the data.

GitHub

Avatar of papaver
papaver uses ScalaScala

worked with scala for around 2 years. really enjoyed the language and getting back into the world of functional. unfortunately the community is heavily fragmented and the language itself broken and inconsistent. that with the various factions involved made it a put of for long term investment.

Avatar of ShadowICT
ShadowICT uses PHPPHP

We use PHP as our main backend preprocessor. Being a well established language, it is supported by a large community as well as a dedicated team of developers. It is used for much heavier projects that do not require realtime processes as well as being used in a hybrid system alongside NodeJS.

Avatar of Andrew Gatenby
Andrew Gatenby uses PHPPHP

PHP has been the backbone of what we've done at Visualsoft for years. We have lots of experienced people who have used it and know how to get the best out of it. It's come on leaps and bounds over recent years, and is the basis of pretty much everything we'll build with.

Avatar of Stanislaus Madueke
Stanislaus Madueke uses ScalaScala

Scala, Akka and Spray (which became Akka-Http) provided the building blocks for the menu service.
Akka's actors and finite-state machine were a natural way to model a USSD menu (a series of stateful interactions between a subscriber and the USSD gateway).

Avatar of Ordius IT Solutions Pvt Ltd
Ordius IT Solutions Pvt Ltd uses PHPPHP

The reason being they are simple to learn and easy to implement apps on any size.

The learning curve for PHP and MySQL is less compared to MEAN. It’s advisable to learn PHP and MySQL if you want to have a taste of web-development or you are in a hurry.

Avatar of IPWHOIS.io - IP Geolocation API
IPWHOIS.io - IP Geolocation API uses PHPPHP

Use the ipwhois.io IP lookup API to quickly and simply integrate IP geolocation into your script or website. Save yourself the hassle of setting up local GeoIP libraries and having to remember to regularly update the data.

Avatar of Giovanni Candido da Silva
Giovanni Candido da Silva uses ScalaScala

Replaces entirely the Java Language to build a much more expressive and powerful code on the backend, while leveraging at the same time the Java Platform Tools and Frameworks, is a mixture of old and mature with new and sexy.

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