Alternatives to Twisted logo

Alternatives to Twisted

Twist, Node.js, ASP.NET, Rails, and Django are the most popular alternatives and competitors to Twisted.
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What is Twisted and what are its top alternatives?

Twisted is an event-driven networking engine written in Python and licensed under the open source ​MIT license. Twisted runs on Python 2 and an ever growing subset also works with Python 3. Twisted also supports many common network protocols, including SMTP, POP3, IMAP, SSHv2, and DNS.
Twisted is a tool in the Frameworks (Full Stack) category of a tech stack.
Twisted is an open source tool with 3.7K GitHub stars and 929 GitHub forks. Here’s a link to Twisted's open source repository on GitHub

Twisted alternatives & related posts

Twist logo

Twist

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Slack without the annoying distractions
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    Francisco Quintero
    Francisco Quintero
    Tech Lead at Dev As Pros · | 7 upvotes · 80.1K views
    atDev As ProsDev As Pros
    Node.js
    Node.js
    Rails
    Rails
    Amazon EC2
    Amazon EC2
    Heroku
    Heroku
    RuboCop
    RuboCop
    JavaScript
    JavaScript
    ESLint
    ESLint
    Slack
    Slack
    Twist
    Twist

    For many(if not all) small and medium size business time and cost matter a lot.

    That's why languages, frameworks, tools, and services that are easy to use and provide 0 to productive in less time, it's best.

    Maybe Node.js frameworks might provide better features compared to Rails but in terms of MVPs, for us Rails is the leading alternative.

    Amazon EC2 might be cheaper and more customizable than Heroku but in the initial terms of a project, you need to complete configurationos and deploy early.

    Advanced configurations can be done down the road, when the project is running and making money, not before.

    But moving fast isn't the only thing we care about. We also take the job to leave a good codebase from the beginning and because of that we try to follow, as much as we can, style guides in Ruby with RuboCop and in JavaScript with ESLint and StandardJS.

    Finally, comunication and keeping a good history of conversations, decisions, and discussions is important so we use a mix of Slack and Twist

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    Node.js logo

    Node.js

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    A platform built on Chrome's JavaScript runtime for easily building fast, scalable network applications
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    Nick Parsons
    Nick Parsons
    Director of Developer Marketing at Stream · | 34 upvotes · 287.9K views
    atStreamStream
    Stream
    Stream
    Go
    Go
    JavaScript
    JavaScript
    ES6
    ES6
    Node.js
    Node.js
    Babel
    Babel
    Yarn
    Yarn
    Python
    Python
    #FrameworksFullStack
    #Languages

    Winds 2.0 is an open source Podcast/RSS reader developed by Stream with a core goal to enable a wide range of developers to contribute.

    We chose JavaScript because nearly every developer knows or can, at the very least, read JavaScript. With ES6 and Node.js v10.x.x, it’s become a very capable language. Async/Await is powerful and easy to use (Async/Await vs Promises). Babel allows us to experiment with next-generation JavaScript (features that are not in the official JavaScript spec yet). Yarn allows us to consistently install packages quickly (and is filled with tons of new tricks)

    We’re using JavaScript for everything – both front and backend. Most of our team is experienced with Go and Python, so Node was not an obvious choice for this app.

    Sure... there will be haters who refuse to acknowledge that there is anything remotely positive about JavaScript (there are even rants on Hacker News about Node.js); however, without writing completely in JavaScript, we would not have seen the results we did.

    #FrameworksFullStack #Languages

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    Nick Rockwell
    Nick Rockwell
    CTO at NY Times · | 28 upvotes · 404.3K views
    atThe New York TimesThe New York Times
    MySQL
    MySQL
    PHP
    PHP
    React
    React
    Apollo
    Apollo
    GraphQL
    GraphQL
    Node.js
    Node.js
    Kafka
    Kafka
    Apache HTTP Server
    Apache HTTP Server

    When I joined NYT there was already broad dissatisfaction with the LAMP (Linux Apache HTTP Server MySQL PHP) Stack and the front end framework, in particular. So, I wasn't passing judgment on it. I mean, LAMP's fine, you can do good work in LAMP. It's a little dated at this point, but it's not ... I didn't want to rip it out for its own sake, but everyone else was like, "We don't like this, it's really inflexible." And I remember from being outside the company when that was called MIT FIVE when it had launched. And been observing it from the outside, and I was like, you guys took so long to do that and you did it so carefully, and yet you're not happy with your decisions. Why is that? That was more the impetus. If we're going to do this again, how are we going to do it in a way that we're gonna get a better result?

    So we're moving quickly away from LAMP, I would say. So, right now, the new front end is React based and using Apollo. And we've been in a long, protracted, gradual rollout of the core experiences.

    React is now talking to GraphQL as a primary API. There's a Node.js back end, to the front end, which is mainly for server-side rendering, as well.

    Behind there, the main repository for the GraphQL server is a big table repository, that we call Bodega because it's a convenience store. And that reads off of a Kafka pipeline.

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    ASP.NET logo

    ASP.NET

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    An open source web framework for building modern web apps and services with .NET
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      Greg Neumann
      Greg Neumann
      Indie, Solo, Developer · | 6 upvotes · 110K views
      Xamarin
      Xamarin
      .NET Core
      .NET Core
      Xamarin Forms
      Xamarin Forms
      ASP.NET
      ASP.NET
      Quasar Framework
      Quasar Framework
      Electron
      Electron
      Vue.js
      Vue.js
      TypeScript
      TypeScript

      Finding the most effective dev stack for a solo developer. Over the past year, I've been looking at many tech stacks that would be 'best' for me, as a solo, indie, developer to deliver a desktop app (Windows & Mac) plus mobile - iOS mainly. Initially, Xamarin started to stand-out. Using .NET Core as the run-time, Xamarin as the native API provider and Xamarin Forms for the UI seemed to solve all issues. But, the cracks soon started to appear. Xamarin Forms is mobile only; the Windows incarnation is different. There is no Mac UI solution (you have to code it natively in Mac OS Storyboard. I was also worried how Xamarin Forms , if I was to use it, was going to cope, in future, with Apple's new SwiftUI and Google's new Fuchsia.

      This plethora of techs for the UI-layer made me reach for the safer waters of using Web-techs for the UI. Lovely! Consistency everywhere (well, mostly). But that consistency evaporates when platform issues are addressed. There are so many web frameworks!

      But, I made a simple decision. It's just me...I am clever, but there is no army of coders here. And I have big plans for a business app. How could just 1 developer go-on to deploy a decent app to Windows, iPhone, iPad & Mac OS? I remembered earlier days when I've used Microsoft's ASP.NET to scaffold - generate - loads of Code for a web-app that I needed for several charities that I worked with. What 'generators' exist that do a lot of the platform-specific rubbish, allow the necessary customisation of such platform integration and provide a decent UI?

      I've placed my colours to the Quasar Framework mast. Oh dear, that means Electron desktop apps doesn't it? Well, Ive had enough of loads of Developers saying that "the menus won't look native" or "it uses too much RAM" and so on. I've been using non-native UI-wrapped apps for ages - the date picker in Outlook on iOS is way better than the native date-picker and I'd been using it for years without getting hot under the collar about it. Developers do get so hung-up on things that busy Users hardly notice; don't you think?. As to the RAM usage issue; that's a bit true. But Users only really notice when an app uses so much RAM that the machine starts to page-out. Electron contributes towards that horizon but does not cause it. My Users will be business-users after all. Somewhat decent machines.

      Looking forward to all that lovely Vue.js around my TypeScript and all those really, really, b e a u t I f u l UI controls of Quasar Framework . Still not sure that 1 dev can deliver all that... but I'm up for trying...

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      Heroku
      Heroku
      Netlify
      Netlify
      Vue.js
      Vue.js
      Angular 2
      Angular 2
      React
      React
      ExpressJS
      ExpressJS
      vuex
      vuex
      Puppeteer
      Puppeteer
      ASP.NET
      ASP.NET
      #Heroku
      #Seo

      I found Heroku to be a great option to get ExpressJS up and running with very little hustle. The free tier is great, but I'd recommend to set up a cronjob to visit your site every few minutes so that the server stays awake. Netlify was the option to host the front-end because doing the server side rendering on #Heroku would have taken a little more time than I'd like to. For the moment pre-rendering the app with prerender-spa-plugin is enough to help with #seo. Puppeteer was my choice over other options because it made it easier to scrape websites made on ASP.NET which is what I needed in this case. And Vue.js is my top choice at the moment because it's really beginner friendly and it has a lot of the features I like about Angular 2 and React. vuex is a must in most of the app I build.

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      Rails logo

      Rails

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      Web development that doesn't hurt
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      Zach Holman
      Zach Holman
      at Zach Holman · | 26 upvotes · 221.3K views
      React
      React
      Apollo
      Apollo
      Rails
      Rails
      JavaScript
      JavaScript

      Oof. I have truly hated JavaScript for a long time. Like, for over twenty years now. Like, since the Clinton administration. It's always been a nightmare to deal with all of the aspects of that silly language.

      But wowza, things have changed. Tooling is just way, way better. I'm primarily web-oriented, and using React and Apollo together the past few years really opened my eyes to building rich apps. And I deeply apologize for using the phrase rich apps; I don't think I've ever said such Enterprisey words before.

      But yeah, things are different now. I still love Rails, and still use it for a lot of apps I build. But it's that silly rich apps phrase that's the problem. Users have way more comprehensive expectations than they did even five years ago, and the JS community does a good job at building tools and tech that tackle the problems of making heavy, complicated UI and frontend work.

      Obviously there's a lot of things happening here, so just saying "JavaScript isn't terrible" might encompass a huge amount of libraries and frameworks. But if you're like me, yeah, give things another shot- I'm somehow not hating on JavaScript anymore and... gulp... I kinda love it.