Alternatives to Amazon S3 logo

Alternatives to Amazon S3

Amazon Glacier, Amazon EBS, Amazon EC2, Google Drive, and Microsoft Azure are the most popular alternatives and competitors to Amazon S3.
52.6K
39.3K
+ 1
2K

What is Amazon S3 and what are its top alternatives?

Amazon S3 (Simple Storage Service) is a popular cloud storage service that provides scalable, secure, and durable object storage. Key features include high availability, low latency, versioning, and lifecycle management. However, one limitation is that costs can quickly escalate as storage needs grow.

  1. Google Cloud Storage: Google's cloud storage service offering scalable and durable object storage with features like lifecycle management and global edge-caching. Pros: Integration with other Google Cloud services, consistent performance. Cons: Pricing can be complex for beginners.

  2. Microsoft Azure Blob Storage: Microsoft's object storage solution providing highly scalable and secure storage. Key features include data encryption at rest and in transit, tiered storage options, and Azure Active Directory integration. Pros: Wide range of storage tiers, integrated with Azure services. Cons: Pricing may be higher compared to other providers.

  3. Backblaze B2: Backblaze's cloud storage platform offering affordable, high-performance object storage with features like S3 compatibility, data immutability, and automatic lifecycle rules. Pros: Transparent pricing, user-friendly interface. Cons: Limited integration with third-party services.

  4. Wasabi: Wasabi provides hot cloud storage with a focus on low latency, high speeds, and secure data storage. Key features include unlimited free egress, immutability, and no hidden fees. Pros: Predictable pricing, high transfer speeds. Cons: Limited availability zones compared to larger providers.

  5. DigitalOcean Spaces: DigitalOcean's object storage solution for storing and serving large amounts of data. Features include CDN integration, automatic data replication, and access controls. Pros: Simple pricing structure, easy setup. Cons: Limited advanced storage features.

  6. IBM Cloud Object Storage: IBM's object storage service designed for large-scale cloud-based applications. Key features include flexibility in regional data storage placement, high availability, and data encryption. Pros: Scalable storage capacity, integrated with IBM Cloud ecosystem. Cons: Complex pricing model for beginners.

  7. MinIO: MinIO is an open-source object storage server compatible with Amazon S3 APIs. It offers high performance, scalability, and AWS S3 Gateway support. Pros: Self-hosted option, high throughput. Cons: Requires more technical expertise to set up and manage.

  8. Scaleway Object Storage: Scaleway offers object storage that is secure, reliable, and easy to use. Features include backup synchronization, access controls, and multi-regional data replication. Pros: Competitive pricing, simple management interface. Cons: Limited availability zones.

  9. Alibaba Cloud Object Storage Service: Alibaba Cloud's object storage service providing scalable and secure data storage with flexible storage classes and global data accessibility. Pros: Integration with Alibaba Cloud services, high availability. Cons: Limited documentation for beginners.

  10. Oracle Cloud Infrastructure Object Storage: Oracle's object storage service offering scalable and secure data storage with features like data encryption, versioning, and archive storage options. Pros: Simple pricing structure, integrated with Oracle Cloud ecosystem. Cons: Limited third-party integrations.

Top Alternatives to Amazon S3

  • Amazon Glacier
    Amazon Glacier

    In order to keep costs low, Amazon Glacier is optimized for data that is infrequently accessed and for which retrieval times of several hours are suitable. With Amazon Glacier, customers can reliably store large or small amounts of data for as little as $0.01 per gigabyte per month, a significant savings compared to on-premises solutions. ...

  • Amazon EBS
    Amazon EBS

    Amazon EBS volumes are network-attached, and persist independently from the life of an instance. Amazon EBS provides highly available, highly reliable, predictable storage volumes that can be attached to a running Amazon EC2 instance and exposed as a device within the instance. Amazon EBS is particularly suited for applications that require a database, file system, or access to raw block level storage. ...

  • Amazon EC2
    Amazon EC2

    It is a web service that provides resizable compute capacity in the cloud. It is designed to make web-scale computing easier for developers. ...

  • Google Drive
    Google Drive

    Keep photos, stories, designs, drawings, recordings, videos, and more. Your first 15 GB of storage are free with a Google Account. Your files in Drive can be reached from any smartphone, tablet, or computer. ...

  • Microsoft Azure
    Microsoft Azure

    Azure is an open and flexible cloud platform that enables you to quickly build, deploy and manage applications across a global network of Microsoft-managed datacenters. You can build applications using any language, tool or framework. And you can integrate your public cloud applications with your existing IT environment. ...

  • Amazon Redshift
    Amazon Redshift

    It is optimized for data sets ranging from a few hundred gigabytes to a petabyte or more and costs less than $1,000 per terabyte per year, a tenth the cost of most traditional data warehousing solutions. ...

  • Amazon RDS
    Amazon RDS

    Amazon RDS gives you access to the capabilities of a familiar MySQL, Oracle or Microsoft SQL Server database engine. This means that the code, applications, and tools you already use today with your existing databases can be used with Amazon RDS. Amazon RDS automatically patches the database software and backs up your database, storing the backups for a user-defined retention period and enabling point-in-time recovery. You benefit from the flexibility of being able to scale the compute resources or storage capacity associated with your Database Instance (DB Instance) via a single API call. ...

  • Dropbox
    Dropbox

    Harness the power of Dropbox. Connect to an account, upload, download, search, and more. ...

Amazon S3 alternatives & related posts

Amazon Glacier logo

Amazon Glacier

126
97
10
Low-cost storage service that provides secure and durable storage for data archiving and backup
126
97
+ 1
10
PROS OF AMAZON GLACIER
  • 6
    Cold Storage
  • 3
    Easy Setup
  • 1
    Cheap
CONS OF AMAZON GLACIER
    Be the first to leave a con

    related Amazon Glacier posts

    Andres Gonzalez
    I dont even know... at Independent · | 3 upvotes · 6.5K views
    Shared insights
    on
    .NET.NETDjangoDjangoAmazon GlacierAmazon Glacier

    I'm starting to plan a new web app for the company that I'm currently working for. The idea is to create a web app where the user will do all the basic operations (upload, delete, update, etc.) on Amazon Glacier. Users basically will admin the account of AWS Glacier, create vaults, tags, upload files, delete files, etc.. all the options AWS Glacier has to offer.

    There will be several users, each user with different AWS Glacier accounts and with unique AWS configurations.

    Another important aspect is the security of the information of each user (the AWS Glacier credentials). I believe I'll need to encrypt this information of each user somehow.

    I'm having second thoughts if I should develop this project with Django or .NET. What do you think? Or maybe is there a third option I should consider besides Django and .Net?

    See more
    Amazon EBS logo

    Amazon EBS

    666
    538
    82
    Block level storage volumes for use with Amazon EC2 instances.
    666
    538
    + 1
    82
    PROS OF AMAZON EBS
    • 36
      Point-in-time snapshots
    • 27
      Data reliability
    • 19
      Configurable i/o performance
    CONS OF AMAZON EBS
      Be the first to leave a con

      related Amazon EBS posts

      I could spin up an Amazon EC2 instance and install PostgreSQL myself, review latest configuration best practices, sort Amazon EBS storage for data, set up a snapshot process etc.

      Alternatively I could use Amazon RDS, Amazon RDS for PostgreSQL or Heroku Postgres and have most of that work handled for me, by a team of world experts...

      See more

      We are looking for a centralised monitoring solution for our application deployed on Amazon EKS. We would like to monitor using metrics from Kubernetes, AWS services (NeptuneDB, AWS Elastic Load Balancing (ELB), Amazon EBS, Amazon S3, etc) and application microservice's custom metrics.

      We are expected to use around 80 microservices (not replicas). I think a total of 200-250 microservices will be there in the system with 10-12 slave nodes.

      We tried Prometheus but it looks like maintenance is a big issue. We need to manage scaling, maintaining the storage, and dealing with multiple exporters and Grafana. I felt this itself needs few dedicated resources (at least 2-3 people) to manage. Not sure if I am thinking in the correct direction. Please confirm.

      You mentioned Datadog and Sysdig charges per host. Does it charge per slave node?

      See more
      Amazon EC2 logo

      Amazon EC2

      47.7K
      35.3K
      2.5K
      Scalable, pay-as-you-go compute capacity in the cloud
      47.7K
      35.3K
      + 1
      2.5K
      PROS OF AMAZON EC2
      • 647
        Quick and reliable cloud servers
      • 515
        Scalability
      • 393
        Easy management
      • 277
        Low cost
      • 271
        Auto-scaling
      • 89
        Market leader
      • 80
        Backed by amazon
      • 79
        Reliable
      • 67
        Free tier
      • 58
        Easy management, scalability
      • 13
        Flexible
      • 10
        Easy to Start
      • 9
        Elastic
      • 9
        Web-scale
      • 9
        Widely used
      • 7
        Node.js API
      • 5
        Industry Standard
      • 4
        Lots of configuration options
      • 2
        GPU instances
      • 1
        Simpler to understand and learn
      • 1
        Extremely simple to use
      • 1
        Amazing for individuals
      • 1
        All the Open Source CLI tools you could want.
      CONS OF AMAZON EC2
      • 13
        Ui could use a lot of work
      • 6
        High learning curve when compared to PaaS
      • 3
        Extremely poor CPU performance

      related Amazon EC2 posts

      Ashish Singh
      Tech Lead, Big Data Platform at Pinterest · | 38 upvotes · 3M views

      To provide employees with the critical need of interactive querying, we’ve worked with Presto, an open-source distributed SQL query engine, over the years. Operating Presto at Pinterest’s scale has involved resolving quite a few challenges like, supporting deeply nested and huge thrift schemas, slow/ bad worker detection and remediation, auto-scaling cluster, graceful cluster shutdown and impersonation support for ldap authenticator.

      Our infrastructure is built on top of Amazon EC2 and we leverage Amazon S3 for storing our data. This separates compute and storage layers, and allows multiple compute clusters to share the S3 data.

      We have hundreds of petabytes of data and tens of thousands of Apache Hive tables. Our Presto clusters are comprised of a fleet of 450 r4.8xl EC2 instances. Presto clusters together have over 100 TBs of memory and 14K vcpu cores. Within Pinterest, we have close to more than 1,000 monthly active users (out of total 1,600+ Pinterest employees) using Presto, who run about 400K queries on these clusters per month.

      Each query submitted to Presto cluster is logged to a Kafka topic via Singer. Singer is a logging agent built at Pinterest and we talked about it in a previous post. Each query is logged when it is submitted and when it finishes. When a Presto cluster crashes, we will have query submitted events without corresponding query finished events. These events enable us to capture the effect of cluster crashes over time.

      Each Presto cluster at Pinterest has workers on a mix of dedicated AWS EC2 instances and Kubernetes pods. Kubernetes platform provides us with the capability to add and remove workers from a Presto cluster very quickly. The best-case latency on bringing up a new worker on Kubernetes is less than a minute. However, when the Kubernetes cluster itself is out of resources and needs to scale up, it can take up to ten minutes. Some other advantages of deploying on Kubernetes platform is that our Presto deployment becomes agnostic of cloud vendor, instance types, OS, etc.

      #BigData #AWS #DataScience #DataEngineering

      See more
      Simon Reymann
      Senior Fullstack Developer at QUANTUSflow Software GmbH · | 30 upvotes · 9.3M views

      Our whole DevOps stack consists of the following tools:

      • GitHub (incl. GitHub Pages/Markdown for Documentation, GettingStarted and HowTo's) for collaborative review and code management tool
      • Respectively Git as revision control system
      • SourceTree as Git GUI
      • Visual Studio Code as IDE
      • CircleCI for continuous integration (automatize development process)
      • Prettier / TSLint / ESLint as code linter
      • SonarQube as quality gate
      • Docker as container management (incl. Docker Compose for multi-container application management)
      • VirtualBox for operating system simulation tests
      • Kubernetes as cluster management for docker containers
      • Heroku for deploying in test environments
      • nginx as web server (preferably used as facade server in production environment)
      • SSLMate (using OpenSSL) for certificate management
      • Amazon EC2 (incl. Amazon S3) for deploying in stage (production-like) and production environments
      • PostgreSQL as preferred database system
      • Redis as preferred in-memory database/store (great for caching)

      The main reason we have chosen Kubernetes over Docker Swarm is related to the following artifacts:

      • Key features: Easy and flexible installation, Clear dashboard, Great scaling operations, Monitoring is an integral part, Great load balancing concepts, Monitors the condition and ensures compensation in the event of failure.
      • Applications: An application can be deployed using a combination of pods, deployments, and services (or micro-services).
      • Functionality: Kubernetes as a complex installation and setup process, but it not as limited as Docker Swarm.
      • Monitoring: It supports multiple versions of logging and monitoring when the services are deployed within the cluster (Elasticsearch/Kibana (ELK), Heapster/Grafana, Sysdig cloud integration).
      • Scalability: All-in-one framework for distributed systems.
      • Other Benefits: Kubernetes is backed by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), huge community among container orchestration tools, it is an open source and modular tool that works with any OS.
      See more
      Google Drive logo

      Google Drive

      80.1K
      66.7K
      2.1K
      A safe place for all your files
      80.1K
      66.7K
      + 1
      2.1K
      PROS OF GOOGLE DRIVE
      • 505
        Easy to use
      • 326
        Gmail integration
      • 312
        Enough free space
      • 268
        Collaboration
      • 249
        Stable service
      • 128
        Desktop and mobile apps
      • 97
        Offline sync
      • 79
        Apps
      • 74
        15 gb storage
      • 50
        Add-ons
      • 9
        Integrates well
      • 6
        Easy to use
      • 3
        Simple back-up tool
      • 2
        Amazing
      • 2
        Beautiful
      • 2
        Fast upload speeds
      • 2
        The more the merrier
      • 2
        So easy
      • 2
        Wonderful
      • 2
        Linux terminal transfer tools
      • 2
        It has grown to a stable in the cloud office
      • 1
        UI
      • 1
        Windows desktop
      • 1
        G Suite integration
      CONS OF GOOGLE DRIVE
      • 7
        Organization via web ui sucks
      • 2
        Not a real database

      related Google Drive posts

      Tom Klein

      Google Analytics is a great tool to analyze your traffic. To debug our software and ask questions, we love to use Postman and Stack Overflow. Google Drive helps our team to share documents. We're able to build our great products through the APIs by Google Maps, CloudFlare, Stripe, PayPal, Twilio, Let's Encrypt, and TensorFlow.

      See more
      Spenser Coke
      Product Engineer at Loanlink.de · | 9 upvotes · 286K views

      When starting a new company and building a new product w/ limited engineering we chose to optimize for expertise and rapid development, landing on Rails API, w/ AngularJS on the front.

      The reality is that we're building a CRUD app, so we considered going w/ vanilla Rails MVC to optimize velocity early on (it may not be sexy, but it gets the job done). Instead, we opted to split the codebase to allow for a richer front-end experience, focus on skill specificity when hiring, and give us the flexibility to be consumed by multiple clients in the future.

      We also considered .NET core or Node.js for the API layer, and React on the front-end, but our experiences dealing with mature Node APIs and the rapid-fire changes that comes with state management in React-land put us off, given our level of experience with those tools.

      We're using GitHub and Trello to track issues and projects, and a plethora of other tools to help the operational team, like Zapier, MailChimp, Google Drive with some basic Vue.js & HTML5 apps for smaller internal-facing web projects.

      See more
      Microsoft Azure logo

      Microsoft Azure

      24.3K
      17K
      768
      Integrated cloud services and infrastructure to support computing, database, analytics, mobile, and web scenarios.
      24.3K
      17K
      + 1
      768
      PROS OF MICROSOFT AZURE
      • 114
        Scales well and quite easy
      • 96
        Can use .Net or open source tools
      • 81
        Startup friendly
      • 73
        Startup plans via BizSpark
      • 62
        High performance
      • 38
        Wide choice of services
      • 32
        Low cost
      • 32
        Lots of integrations
      • 31
        Reliability
      • 19
        Twillio & Github are directly accessible
      • 13
        RESTful API
      • 10
        PaaS
      • 10
        Enterprise Grade
      • 10
        Startup support
      • 8
        DocumentDB
      • 7
        In person support
      • 6
        Free for students
      • 6
        Service Bus
      • 6
        Virtual Machines
      • 5
        Redis Cache
      • 5
        It rocks
      • 4
        Storage, Backup, and Recovery
      • 4
        Infrastructure Services
      • 4
        SQL Databases
      • 4
        CDN
      • 3
        Integration
      • 3
        Scheduler
      • 3
        Preview Portal
      • 3
        HDInsight
      • 3
        Built on Node.js
      • 3
        Big Data
      • 3
        BizSpark 60k Azure Benefit
      • 3
        IaaS
      • 2
        Backup
      • 2
        Open cloud
      • 2
        Web
      • 2
        SaaS
      • 2
        Big Compute
      • 2
        Mobile
      • 2
        Media
      • 2
        Dev-Test
      • 2
        Storage
      • 2
        StorSimple
      • 2
        Machine Learning
      • 2
        Stream Analytics
      • 2
        Data Factory
      • 2
        Event Hubs
      • 2
        Virtual Network
      • 2
        ExpressRoute
      • 2
        Traffic Manager
      • 2
        Media Services
      • 2
        BizTalk Services
      • 2
        Site Recovery
      • 2
        Active Directory
      • 2
        Multi-Factor Authentication
      • 2
        Visual Studio Online
      • 2
        Application Insights
      • 2
        Automation
      • 2
        Operational Insights
      • 2
        Key Vault
      • 2
        Infrastructure near your customers
      • 2
        Easy Deployment
      • 1
        Enterprise customer preferences
      • 1
        Documentation
      • 1
        Security
      • 1
        Best cloud platfrom
      • 1
        Easy and fast to start with
      • 1
        Remote Debugging
      CONS OF MICROSOFT AZURE
      • 7
        Confusing UI
      • 2
        Expensive plesk on Azure

      related Microsoft Azure posts

      Dale Ross
      Independent Contractor at Self Employed · | 22 upvotes · 1.5M views

      I've heard that I have the ability to write well, at times. When it flows, it flows. I decided to start blogging in 2013 on Blogger. I started a company and joined BizPark with the Microsoft Azure allotment. I created a WordPress blog and did a migration at some point. A lot happened in the time after that migration but I stopped coding and changed cities during tumultuous times that taught me many lessons concerning mental health and productivity. I eventually graduated from BizSpark and outgrew the credit allotment. That killed the WordPress blog.

      I blogged about writing again on the existing Blogger blog but it didn't feel right. I looked at a few options where I wouldn't have to worry about hosting cost indefinitely and Jekyll stood out with GitHub Pages. The Importer was fairly straightforward for the existing blog posts.

      Todo * Set up redirects for all posts on blogger. The URI format is different so a complete redirect wouldn't work. Although, there may be something in Jekyll that could manage the redirects. I did notice the old URLs were stored in the front matter. I'm working on a command-line Ruby gem for the current plan. * I did find some of the lost WordPress posts on archive.org that I downloaded with the waybackmachinedownloader. I think I might write an importer for that. * I still have a few Disqus comment threads to map

      See more
      Ganesa Vijayakumar
      Full Stack Coder | Technical Lead · | 19 upvotes · 4.7M views

      I'm planning to create a web application and also a mobile application to provide a very good shopping experience to the end customers. Shortly, my application will be aggregate the product details from difference sources and giving a clear picture to the user that when and where to buy that product with best in Quality and cost.

      I have planned to develop this in many milestones for adding N number of features and I have picked my first part to complete the core part (aggregate the product details from different sources).

      As per my work experience and knowledge, I have chosen the followings stacks to this mission.

      UI: I would like to develop this application using React, React Router and React Native since I'm a little bit familiar on this and also most importantly these will help on developing both web and mobile apps. In addition, I'm gonna use the stacks JavaScript, jQuery, jQuery UI, jQuery Mobile, Bootstrap wherever required.

      Service: I have planned to use Java as the main business layer language as I have 7+ years of experience on this I believe I can do better work using Java than other languages. In addition, I'm thinking to use the stacks Node.js.

      Database and ORM: I'm gonna pick MySQL as DB and Hibernate as ORM since I have a piece of good knowledge and also work experience on this combination.

      Search Engine: I need to deal with a large amount of product data and it's in-detailed info to provide enough details to end user at the same time I need to focus on the performance area too. so I have decided to use Solr as a search engine for product search and suggestions. In addition, I'm thinking to replace Solr by Elasticsearch once explored/reviewed enough about Elasticsearch.

      Host: As of now, my plan to complete the application with decent features first and deploy it in a free hosting environment like Docker and Heroku and then once it is stable then I have planned to use the AWS products Amazon S3, EC2, Amazon RDS and Amazon Route 53. I'm not sure about Microsoft Azure that what is the specialty in it than Heroku and Amazon EC2 Container Service. Anyhow, I will do explore these once again and pick the best suite one for my requirement once I reached this level.

      Build and Repositories: I have decided to choose Apache Maven and Git as these are my favorites and also so popular on respectively build and repositories.

      Additional Utilities :) - I would like to choose Codacy for code review as their Startup plan will be very helpful to this application. I'm already experienced with Google CheckStyle and SonarQube even I'm looking something on Codacy.

      Happy Coding! Suggestions are welcome! :)

      Thanks, Ganesa

      See more
      Amazon Redshift logo

      Amazon Redshift

      1.5K
      1.4K
      108
      Fast, fully managed, petabyte-scale data warehouse service
      1.5K
      1.4K
      + 1
      108
      PROS OF AMAZON REDSHIFT
      • 41
        Data Warehousing
      • 27
        Scalable
      • 17
        SQL
      • 14
        Backed by Amazon
      • 5
        Encryption
      • 1
        Cheap and reliable
      • 1
        Isolation
      • 1
        Best Cloud DW Performance
      • 1
        Fast columnar storage
      CONS OF AMAZON REDSHIFT
        Be the first to leave a con

        related Amazon Redshift posts

        Julien DeFrance
        Principal Software Engineer at Tophatter · | 16 upvotes · 3.1M views

        Back in 2014, I was given an opportunity to re-architect SmartZip Analytics platform, and flagship product: SmartTargeting. This is a SaaS software helping real estate professionals keeping up with their prospects and leads in a given neighborhood/territory, finding out (thanks to predictive analytics) who's the most likely to list/sell their home, and running cross-channel marketing automation against them: direct mail, online ads, email... The company also does provide Data APIs to Enterprise customers.

        I had inherited years and years of technical debt and I knew things had to change radically. The first enabler to this was to make use of the cloud and go with AWS, so we would stop re-inventing the wheel, and build around managed/scalable services.

        For the SaaS product, we kept on working with Rails as this was what my team had the most knowledge in. We've however broken up the monolith and decoupled the front-end application from the backend thanks to the use of Rails API so we'd get independently scalable micro-services from now on.

        Our various applications could now be deployed using AWS Elastic Beanstalk so we wouldn't waste any more efforts writing time-consuming Capistrano deployment scripts for instance. Combined with Docker so our application would run within its own container, independently from the underlying host configuration.

        Storage-wise, we went with Amazon S3 and ditched any pre-existing local or network storage people used to deal with in our legacy systems. On the database side: Amazon RDS / MySQL initially. Ultimately migrated to Amazon RDS for Aurora / MySQL when it got released. Once again, here you need a managed service your cloud provider handles for you.

        Future improvements / technology decisions included:

        Caching: Amazon ElastiCache / Memcached CDN: Amazon CloudFront Systems Integration: Segment / Zapier Data-warehousing: Amazon Redshift BI: Amazon Quicksight / Superset Search: Elasticsearch / Amazon Elasticsearch Service / Algolia Monitoring: New Relic

        As our usage grows, patterns changed, and/or our business needs evolved, my role as Engineering Manager then Director of Engineering was also to ensure my team kept on learning and innovating, while delivering on business value.

        One of these innovations was to get ourselves into Serverless : Adopting AWS Lambda was a big step forward. At the time, only available for Node.js (Not Ruby ) but a great way to handle cost efficiency, unpredictable traffic, sudden bursts of traffic... Ultimately you want the whole chain of services involved in a call to be serverless, and that's when we've started leveraging Amazon DynamoDB on these projects so they'd be fully scalable.

        See more
        Ankit Sobti

        Looker , Stitch , Amazon Redshift , dbt

        We recently moved our Data Analytics and Business Intelligence tooling to Looker . It's already helping us create a solid process for reusable SQL-based data modeling, with consistent definitions across the entire organizations. Looker allows us to collaboratively build these version-controlled models and push the limits of what we've traditionally been able to accomplish with analytics with a lean team.

        For Data Engineering, we're in the process of moving from maintaining our own ETL pipelines on AWS to a managed ELT system on Stitch. We're also evaluating the command line tool, dbt to manage data transformations. Our hope is that Stitch + dbt will streamline the ELT bit, allowing us to focus our energies on analyzing data, rather than managing it.

        See more
        Amazon RDS logo

        Amazon RDS

        15.6K
        10.6K
        761
        Set up, operate, and scale a relational database in the cloud.
        15.6K
        10.6K
        + 1
        761
        PROS OF AMAZON RDS
        • 165
          Reliable failovers
        • 156
          Automated backups
        • 130
          Backed by amazon
        • 92
          Db snapshots
        • 87
          Multi-availability
        • 30
          Control iops, fast restore to point of time
        • 28
          Security
        • 24
          Elastic
        • 20
          Push-button scaling
        • 20
          Automatic software patching
        • 4
          Replication
        • 3
          Reliable
        • 2
          Isolation
        CONS OF AMAZON RDS
          Be the first to leave a con

          related Amazon RDS posts

          Ganesa Vijayakumar
          Full Stack Coder | Technical Lead · | 19 upvotes · 4.7M views

          I'm planning to create a web application and also a mobile application to provide a very good shopping experience to the end customers. Shortly, my application will be aggregate the product details from difference sources and giving a clear picture to the user that when and where to buy that product with best in Quality and cost.

          I have planned to develop this in many milestones for adding N number of features and I have picked my first part to complete the core part (aggregate the product details from different sources).

          As per my work experience and knowledge, I have chosen the followings stacks to this mission.

          UI: I would like to develop this application using React, React Router and React Native since I'm a little bit familiar on this and also most importantly these will help on developing both web and mobile apps. In addition, I'm gonna use the stacks JavaScript, jQuery, jQuery UI, jQuery Mobile, Bootstrap wherever required.

          Service: I have planned to use Java as the main business layer language as I have 7+ years of experience on this I believe I can do better work using Java than other languages. In addition, I'm thinking to use the stacks Node.js.

          Database and ORM: I'm gonna pick MySQL as DB and Hibernate as ORM since I have a piece of good knowledge and also work experience on this combination.

          Search Engine: I need to deal with a large amount of product data and it's in-detailed info to provide enough details to end user at the same time I need to focus on the performance area too. so I have decided to use Solr as a search engine for product search and suggestions. In addition, I'm thinking to replace Solr by Elasticsearch once explored/reviewed enough about Elasticsearch.

          Host: As of now, my plan to complete the application with decent features first and deploy it in a free hosting environment like Docker and Heroku and then once it is stable then I have planned to use the AWS products Amazon S3, EC2, Amazon RDS and Amazon Route 53. I'm not sure about Microsoft Azure that what is the specialty in it than Heroku and Amazon EC2 Container Service. Anyhow, I will do explore these once again and pick the best suite one for my requirement once I reached this level.

          Build and Repositories: I have decided to choose Apache Maven and Git as these are my favorites and also so popular on respectively build and repositories.

          Additional Utilities :) - I would like to choose Codacy for code review as their Startup plan will be very helpful to this application. I'm already experienced with Google CheckStyle and SonarQube even I'm looking something on Codacy.

          Happy Coding! Suggestions are welcome! :)

          Thanks, Ganesa

          See more
          John-Daniel Trask
          Co-founder & CEO at Raygun · | 19 upvotes · 256K views

          We chose AWS because, at the time, it was really the only cloud provider to choose from.

          We tend to use their basic building blocks (EC2, ELB, Amazon S3, Amazon RDS) rather than vendor specific components like databases and queuing. We deliberately decided to do this to ensure we could provide multi-cloud support or potentially move to another cloud provider if the offering was better for our customers.

          We’ve utilized c3.large nodes for both the Node.js deployment and then for the .NET Core deployment. Both sit as backends behind an nginx instance and are managed using scaling groups in Amazon EC2 sitting behind a standard AWS Elastic Load Balancing (ELB).

          While we’re satisfied with AWS, we do review our decision each year and have looked at Azure and Google Cloud offerings.

          #CloudHosting #WebServers #CloudStorage #LoadBalancerReverseProxy

          See more
          Dropbox logo

          Dropbox

          23.1K
          18K
          1.7K
          Build the power of Dropbox into your apps
          23.1K
          18K
          + 1
          1.7K
          PROS OF DROPBOX
          • 434
            Easy to work with
          • 256
            Free
          • 216
            Popular
          • 176
            Shared file hosting
          • 167
            'just works'
          • 100
            No brainer
          • 79
            Integration with external services
          • 76
            Simple
          • 49
            Good api
          • 38
            Least cost (free) for the basic needs case
          • 11
            It just works
          • 8
            Convenient
          • 7
            Accessible from all of my devices
          • 5
            Command Line client
          • 4
            Synchronizing laptop and desktop - work anywhere
          • 4
            Can even be used by your grandma
          • 3
            Reliable
          • 3
            Sync API
          • 3
            Mac app
          • 3
            Cross platform app
          • 2
            Ability to pay monthly without losing your files
          • 2
            Delta synchronization
          • 2
            Everybody needs to share and synchronize files reliably
          • 2
            Backups, local and cloud
          • 2
            Extended version history
          • 2
            Beautiful UI
          • 1
            YC Company
          • 1
            What a beautiful app
          • 1
            Easy/no setup
          • 1
            So easy
          • 1
            The more the merrier
          • 1
            Easy to work with
          • 1
            For when client needs file without opening firewall
          • 1
            Everybody needs to share and synchronize files reliabl
          • 1
            Easy to use
          • 1
            Official Linux app
          • 0
            The more the merrier
          CONS OF DROPBOX
          • 3
            Personal vs company account is confusing
          • 1
            Replication kills CPU and battery

          related Dropbox posts

          Shared insights
          on
          Google DriveGoogle DriveDropboxDropbox

          I created a simple upload/download functionality for a web application and connected it to Mongo, now I can upload, store and download files. I need advice on how to create a SPA similar to Dropbox or Google Drive in that it will be a hierarchy of folders with files within them, how would I go about creating this structure and adding this functionality to all the files within the application?

          Intuitively creating a react component and adding it to a File object seems like the way to go, what are some issues to expect and how do I go about creating such an application to be as fast and UI-friendly as possible?

          See more
          Jason Barry
          Cofounder at FeaturePeek · | 4 upvotes · 2.4M views

          We've tried a couple REST clients over the years, and Insomnia REST Client has won us over the most. Here's what we like about it compared to other contenders in this category:

          • Uncluttered UI. Things are only in your face when you need them, and the app is visually organized in an intuitive manner.
          • Native Mac app. We wanted the look and feel to be on par with other apps in our OS rather than a web app / Electron app (cough Postman).
          • Easy team sync. Other apps have this too, but Insomnia's model best sets the "set and forget" mentality. Syncs are near instant and I'm always assured that I'm working on the latest version of API endpoints. Apps like Paw use a git-based approach to revision history, but I think this actually over-complicates the sync feature. For ensuring I'm always working on the latest version of something, I'd rather have the sync model be closer to Dropbox's than git's, and Insomnia is closer to Dropbox in that regard.

          Some features like automatic public-facing documentation aren't supported, but we currently don't have any public APIs, so this didn't matter to us.

          See more