Alternatives to Amazon S3 logo

Alternatives to Amazon S3

Amazon Glacier, Amazon EBS, Amazon EC2, Google Drive, and Microsoft Azure are the most popular alternatives and competitors to Amazon S3.
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What is Amazon S3 and what are its top alternatives?

Amazon Simple Storage Service provides a fully redundant data storage infrastructure for storing and retrieving any amount of data, at any time, from anywhere on the web
Amazon S3 is a tool in the Cloud Storage category of a tech stack.

Amazon S3 alternatives & related posts

Amazon Glacier logo

Amazon Glacier

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Low-cost storage service that provides secure and durable storage for data archiving and backup
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Amazon EBS logo

Amazon EBS

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Block level storage volumes for use with Amazon EC2 instances.
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Amazon EC2 logo

Amazon EC2

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Scalable, pay-as-you-go compute capacity in the cloud
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Ashish Singh
Ashish Singh
Tech Lead, Big Data Platform at Pinterest | 20 upvotes 34.3K views
Apache Hive
Apache Hive
Kubernetes
Kubernetes
Kafka
Kafka
Amazon S3
Amazon S3
Amazon EC2
Amazon EC2
Presto
Presto
#DataScience
#DataEngineering
#AWS
#BigData

To provide employees with the critical need of interactive querying, we鈥檝e worked with Presto, an open-source distributed SQL query engine, over the years. Operating Presto at Pinterest鈥檚 scale has involved resolving quite a few challenges like, supporting deeply nested and huge thrift schemas, slow/ bad worker detection and remediation, auto-scaling cluster, graceful cluster shutdown and impersonation support for ldap authenticator.

Our infrastructure is built on top of Amazon EC2 and we leverage Amazon S3 for storing our data. This separates compute and storage layers, and allows multiple compute clusters to share the S3 data.

We have hundreds of petabytes of data and tens of thousands of Apache Hive tables. Our Presto clusters are comprised of a fleet of 450 r4.8xl EC2 instances. Presto clusters together have over 100 TBs of memory and 14K vcpu cores. Within Pinterest, we have close to more than 1,000 monthly active users (out of total 1,600+ Pinterest employees) using Presto, who run about 400K queries on these clusters per month.

Each query submitted to Presto cluster is logged to a Kafka topic via Singer. Singer is a logging agent built at Pinterest and we talked about it in a previous post. Each query is logged when it is submitted and when it finishes. When a Presto cluster crashes, we will have query submitted events without corresponding query finished events. These events enable us to capture the effect of cluster crashes over time.

Each Presto cluster at Pinterest has workers on a mix of dedicated AWS EC2 instances and Kubernetes pods. Kubernetes platform provides us with the capability to add and remove workers from a Presto cluster very quickly. The best-case latency on bringing up a new worker on Kubernetes is less than a minute. However, when the Kubernetes cluster itself is out of resources and needs to scale up, it can take up to ten minutes. Some other advantages of deploying on Kubernetes platform is that our Presto deployment becomes agnostic of cloud vendor, instance types, OS, etc.

#BigData #AWS #DataScience #DataEngineering

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John-Daniel Trask
John-Daniel Trask
Co-founder & CEO at Raygun | 19 upvotes 84.1K views
atRaygunRaygun
Amazon S3
Amazon S3
Amazon RDS
Amazon RDS
nginx
nginx
Amazon EC2
Amazon EC2
AWS Elastic Load Balancing (ELB)
AWS Elastic Load Balancing (ELB)
#CloudHosting
#WebServers
#CloudStorage
#LoadBalancerReverseProxy

We chose AWS because, at the time, it was really the only cloud provider to choose from.

We tend to use their basic building blocks (EC2, ELB, Amazon S3, Amazon RDS) rather than vendor specific components like databases and queuing. We deliberately decided to do this to ensure we could provide multi-cloud support or potentially move to another cloud provider if the offering was better for our customers.

We鈥檝e utilized c3.large nodes for both the Node.js deployment and then for the .NET Core deployment. Both sit as backends behind an nginx instance and are managed using scaling groups in Amazon EC2 sitting behind a standard AWS Elastic Load Balancing (ELB).

While we鈥檙e satisfied with AWS, we do review our decision each year and have looked at Azure and Google Cloud offerings.

#CloudHosting #WebServers #CloudStorage #LoadBalancerReverseProxy

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Joshua Dean K眉pper
Joshua Dean K眉pper
CEO at Scrayos UG (haftungsbeschr盲nkt) | 1 upvotes 29.4K views
atScrayos UG (haftungsbeschr盲nkt)Scrayos UG (haftungsbeschr盲nkt)
Google Drive
Google Drive
Trello
Trello
Wekan
Wekan
Nextcloud
Nextcloud

We use Nextcloud for company-file-management, personal work-documents and for collaborative work (through collabora), organize our #TODOs, that are not covered by the Bugtracker. Existing solutions either were very expensive ( Google Drive ), missed a lot of features ( Trello ) or were pretty much overloaded with features ( Wekan within Sandstorm ).

That made Nextcloud ud our natural fit for our company management and we're convinced of its integrations and flexibility.

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Jorge Cortell
Jorge Cortell
Founder & CEO at Kanteron Systems | 1 upvotes 13.4K views
atKanteron SystemsKanteron Systems
Dropbox
Dropbox
Google Drive
Google Drive

We originally used Dropbox as an easy way to store and share documents, but moved to the much more powerful and convenient Google Drive, although we still use Dropbox occasionally.

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Microsoft Azure logo

Microsoft Azure

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Integrated cloud services and infrastructure to support computing, database, analytics, mobile, and web scenarios.
Microsoft Azure logo
Microsoft Azure
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Amazon S3

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Kestas Barzdaitis
Kestas Barzdaitis
Entrepreneur & Engineer | 14 upvotes 88.2K views
atCodeFactorCodeFactor
Kubernetes
Kubernetes
CodeFactor.io
CodeFactor.io
Amazon EC2
Amazon EC2
Microsoft Azure
Microsoft Azure
Google Compute Engine
Google Compute Engine
Docker
Docker
AWS Lambda
AWS Lambda
Azure Functions
Azure Functions
Google Cloud Functions
Google Cloud Functions
#SAAS
#IAAS
#Containerization
#Autoscale
#Startup
#Automation
#Machinelearning
#AI
#Devops

CodeFactor being a #SAAS product, our goal was to run on a cloud-native infrastructure since day one. We wanted to stay product focused, rather than having to work on the infrastructure that supports the application. We needed a cloud-hosting provider that would be reliable, economical and most efficient for our product.

CodeFactor.io aims to provide an automated and frictionless code review service for software developers. That requires agility, instant provisioning, autoscaling, security, availability and compliance management features. We looked at the top three #IAAS providers that take up the majority of market share: Amazon's Amazon EC2 , Microsoft's Microsoft Azure, and Google Compute Engine.

AWS has been available since 2006 and has developed the most extensive services ant tools variety at a massive scale. Azure and GCP are about half the AWS age, but also satisfied our technical requirements.

It is worth noting that even though all three providers support Docker containerization services, GCP has the most robust offering due to their investments in Kubernetes. Also, if you are a Microsoft shop, and develop in .NET - Visual Studio Azure shines at integration there and all your existing .NET code works seamlessly on Azure. All three providers have serverless computing offerings (AWS Lambda, Azure Functions, and Google Cloud Functions). Additionally, all three providers have machine learning tools, but GCP appears to be the most developer-friendly, intuitive and complete when it comes to #Machinelearning and #AI.

The prices between providers are competitive across the board. For our requirements, AWS would have been the most expensive, GCP the least expensive and Azure was in the middle. Plus, if you #Autoscale frequently with large deltas, note that Azure and GCP have per minute billing, where AWS bills you per hour. We also applied for the #Startup programs with all three providers, and this is where Azure shined. While AWS and GCP for startups would have covered us for about one year of infrastructure costs, Azure Sponsorship would cover about two years of CodeFactor's hosting costs. Moreover, Azure Team was terrific - I felt that they wanted to work with us where for AWS and GCP we were just another startup.

In summary, we were leaning towards GCP. GCP's advantages in containerization, automation toolset, #Devops mindset, and pricing were the driving factors there. Nevertheless, we could not say no to Azure's financial incentives and a strong sense of partnership and support throughout the process.

Bottom line is, IAAS offerings with AWS, Azure, and GCP are evolving fast. At CodeFactor, we aim to be platform agnostic where it is practical and retain the flexibility to cherry-pick the best products across providers.

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Omar Mehilba
Omar Mehilba
Co-Founder and COO at Magalix | 13 upvotes 58.6K views
atMagalixMagalix
Kubernetes
Kubernetes
Microsoft Azure
Microsoft Azure
Google Kubernetes Engine
Google Kubernetes Engine
Amazon EC2
Amazon EC2
Go
Go
Python
Python
#Autopilot

We are hardcore Kubernetes users and contributors. We loved the automation it provides. However, as our team grew and added more clusters and microservices, capacity and resources management becomes a massive pain to us. We started suffering from a lot of outages and unexpected behavior as we promote our code from dev to production environments. Luckily we were working on our AI-powered tools to understand different dependencies, predict usage, and calculate the right resources and configurations that should be applied to our infrastructure and microservices. We dogfooded our agent (http://github.com/magalixcorp/magalix-agent) and were able to stabilize as the #autopilot continuously recovered any miscalculations we made or because of unexpected changes in workloads. We are open sourcing our agent in a few days. Check it out and let us know what you think! We run workloads on Microsoft Azure Google Kubernetes Engine and Amazon EC2 and we're all about Go and Python!

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Amazon Redshift logo

Amazon Redshift

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Fast, fully managed, petabyte-scale data warehouse service
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Amazon Redshift
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Amazon S3

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Julien DeFrance
Julien DeFrance
Principal Software Engineer at Tophatter | 16 upvotes 517.9K views
atSmartZipSmartZip
Rails
Rails
Rails API
Rails API
AWS Elastic Beanstalk
AWS Elastic Beanstalk
Capistrano
Capistrano
Docker
Docker
Amazon S3
Amazon S3
Amazon RDS
Amazon RDS
MySQL
MySQL
Amazon RDS for Aurora
Amazon RDS for Aurora
Amazon ElastiCache
Amazon ElastiCache
Memcached
Memcached
Amazon CloudFront
Amazon CloudFront
Segment
Segment
Zapier
Zapier
Amazon Redshift
Amazon Redshift
Amazon Quicksight
Amazon Quicksight
Superset
Superset
Elasticsearch
Elasticsearch
Amazon Elasticsearch Service
Amazon Elasticsearch Service
New Relic
New Relic
AWS Lambda
AWS Lambda
Node.js
Node.js
Ruby
Ruby
Amazon DynamoDB
Amazon DynamoDB
Algolia
Algolia

Back in 2014, I was given an opportunity to re-architect SmartZip Analytics platform, and flagship product: SmartTargeting. This is a SaaS software helping real estate professionals keeping up with their prospects and leads in a given neighborhood/territory, finding out (thanks to predictive analytics) who's the most likely to list/sell their home, and running cross-channel marketing automation against them: direct mail, online ads, email... The company also does provide Data APIs to Enterprise customers.

I had inherited years and years of technical debt and I knew things had to change radically. The first enabler to this was to make use of the cloud and go with AWS, so we would stop re-inventing the wheel, and build around managed/scalable services.

For the SaaS product, we kept on working with Rails as this was what my team had the most knowledge in. We've however broken up the monolith and decoupled the front-end application from the backend thanks to the use of Rails API so we'd get independently scalable micro-services from now on.

Our various applications could now be deployed using AWS Elastic Beanstalk so we wouldn't waste any more efforts writing time-consuming Capistrano deployment scripts for instance. Combined with Docker so our application would run within its own container, independently from the underlying host configuration.

Storage-wise, we went with Amazon S3 and ditched any pre-existing local or network storage people used to deal with in our legacy systems. On the database side: Amazon RDS / MySQL initially. Ultimately migrated to Amazon RDS for Aurora / MySQL when it got released. Once again, here you need a managed service your cloud provider handles for you.

Future improvements / technology decisions included:

Caching: Amazon ElastiCache / Memcached CDN: Amazon CloudFront Systems Integration: Segment / Zapier Data-warehousing: Amazon Redshift BI: Amazon Quicksight / Superset Search: Elasticsearch / Amazon Elasticsearch Service / Algolia Monitoring: New Relic

As our usage grows, patterns changed, and/or our business needs evolved, my role as Engineering Manager then Director of Engineering was also to ensure my team kept on learning and innovating, while delivering on business value.

One of these innovations was to get ourselves into Serverless : Adopting AWS Lambda was a big step forward. At the time, only available for Node.js (Not Ruby ) but a great way to handle cost efficiency, unpredictable traffic, sudden bursts of traffic... Ultimately you want the whole chain of services involved in a call to be serverless, and that's when we've started leveraging Amazon DynamoDB on these projects so they'd be fully scalable.

See more
Ankit Sobti
Ankit Sobti
CTO at Postman Inc | 11 upvotes 86.2K views
atPostmanPostman
Looker
Looker
Stitch
Stitch
Amazon Redshift
Amazon Redshift
dbt
dbt

Looker , Stitch , Amazon Redshift , dbt

We recently moved our Data Analytics and Business Intelligence tooling to Looker . It's already helping us create a solid process for reusable SQL-based data modeling, with consistent definitions across the entire organizations. Looker allows us to collaboratively build these version-controlled models and push the limits of what we've traditionally been able to accomplish with analytics with a lean team.

For Data Engineering, we're in the process of moving from maintaining our own ETL pipelines on AWS to a managed ELT system on Stitch. We're also evaluating the command line tool, dbt to manage data transformations. Our hope is that Stitch + dbt will streamline the ELT bit, allowing us to focus our energies on analyzing data, rather than managing it.

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Amazon RDS logo

Amazon RDS

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Set up, operate, and scale a relational database in the cloud.
Amazon RDS logo
Amazon RDS
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Amazon S3

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Julien DeFrance
Julien DeFrance
Principal Software Engineer at Tophatter | 16 upvotes 517.9K views
atSmartZipSmartZip
Rails
Rails
Rails API
Rails API
AWS Elastic Beanstalk
AWS Elastic Beanstalk
Capistrano
Capistrano
Docker
Docker
Amazon S3
Amazon S3
Amazon RDS
Amazon RDS
MySQL
MySQL
Amazon RDS for Aurora
Amazon RDS for Aurora
Amazon ElastiCache
Amazon ElastiCache
Memcached
Memcached
Amazon CloudFront
Amazon CloudFront
Segment
Segment
Zapier
Zapier
Amazon Redshift
Amazon Redshift
Amazon Quicksight
Amazon Quicksight
Superset
Superset
Elasticsearch
Elasticsearch
Amazon Elasticsearch Service
Amazon Elasticsearch Service
New Relic
New Relic
AWS Lambda
AWS Lambda
Node.js
Node.js
Ruby
Ruby
Amazon DynamoDB
Amazon DynamoDB
Algolia
Algolia

Back in 2014, I was given an opportunity to re-architect SmartZip Analytics platform, and flagship product: SmartTargeting. This is a SaaS software helping real estate professionals keeping up with their prospects and leads in a given neighborhood/territory, finding out (thanks to predictive analytics) who's the most likely to list/sell their home, and running cross-channel marketing automation against them: direct mail, online ads, email... The company also does provide Data APIs to Enterprise customers.

I had inherited years and years of technical debt and I knew things had to change radically. The first enabler to this was to make use of the cloud and go with AWS, so we would stop re-inventing the wheel, and build around managed/scalable services.

For the SaaS product, we kept on working with Rails as this was what my team had the most knowledge in. We've however broken up the monolith and decoupled the front-end application from the backend thanks to the use of Rails API so we'd get independently scalable micro-services from now on.

Our various applications could now be deployed using AWS Elastic Beanstalk so we wouldn't waste any more efforts writing time-consuming Capistrano deployment scripts for instance. Combined with Docker so our application would run within its own container, independently from the underlying host configuration.

Storage-wise, we went with Amazon S3 and ditched any pre-existing local or network storage people used to deal with in our legacy systems. On the database side: Amazon RDS / MySQL initially. Ultimately migrated to Amazon RDS for Aurora / MySQL when it got released. Once again, here you need a managed service your cloud provider handles for you.

Future improvements / technology decisions included:

Caching: Amazon ElastiCache / Memcached CDN: Amazon CloudFront Systems Integration: Segment / Zapier Data-warehousing: Amazon Redshift BI: Amazon Quicksight / Superset Search: Elasticsearch / Amazon Elasticsearch Service / Algolia Monitoring: New Relic

As our usage grows, patterns changed, and/or our business needs evolved, my role as Engineering Manager then Director of Engineering was also to ensure my team kept on learning and innovating, while delivering on business value.

One of these innovations was to get ourselves into Serverless : Adopting AWS Lambda was a big step forward. At the time, only available for Node.js (Not Ruby ) but a great way to handle cost efficiency, unpredictable traffic, sudden bursts of traffic... Ultimately you want the whole chain of services involved in a call to be serverless, and that's when we've started leveraging Amazon DynamoDB on these projects so they'd be fully scalable.

See more
Ganesa Vijayakumar
Ganesa Vijayakumar
Full Stack Coder | Module Lead | 15 upvotes 507.2K views
Codacy
Codacy
SonarQube
SonarQube
React
React
React Router
React Router
React Native
React Native
JavaScript
JavaScript
jQuery
jQuery
jQuery UI
jQuery UI
jQuery Mobile
jQuery Mobile
Bootstrap
Bootstrap
Java
Java
Node.js
Node.js
MySQL
MySQL
Hibernate
Hibernate
Heroku
Heroku
Amazon S3
Amazon S3
Amazon RDS
Amazon RDS
Solr
Solr
Elasticsearch
Elasticsearch
Amazon Route 53
Amazon Route 53
Microsoft Azure
Microsoft Azure
Amazon EC2 Container Service
Amazon EC2 Container Service
Apache Maven
Apache Maven
Git
Git
Docker
Docker

I'm planning to create a web application and also a mobile application to provide a very good shopping experience to the end customers. Shortly, my application will be aggregate the product details from difference sources and giving a clear picture to the user that when and where to buy that product with best in Quality and cost.

I have planned to develop this in many milestones for adding N number of features and I have picked my first part to complete the core part (aggregate the product details from different sources).

As per my work experience and knowledge, I have chosen the followings stacks to this mission.

UI: I would like to develop this application using React, React Router and React Native since I'm a little bit familiar on this and also most importantly these will help on developing both web and mobile apps. In addition, I'm gonna use the stacks JavaScript, jQuery, jQuery UI, jQuery Mobile, Bootstrap wherever required.

Service: I have planned to use Java as the main business layer language as I have 7+ years of experience on this I believe I can do better work using Java than other languages. In addition, I'm thinking to use the stacks Node.js.

Database and ORM: I'm gonna pick MySQL as DB and Hibernate as ORM since I have a piece of good knowledge and also work experience on this combination.

Search Engine: I need to deal with a large amount of product data and it's in-detailed info to provide enough details to end user at the same time I need to focus on the performance area too. so I have decided to use Solr as a search engine for product search and suggestions. In addition, I'm thinking to replace Solr by Elasticsearch once explored/reviewed enough about Elasticsearch.

Host: As of now, my plan to complete the application with decent features first and deploy it in a free hosting environment like Docker and Heroku and then once it is stable then I have planned to use the AWS products Amazon S3, EC2, Amazon RDS and Amazon Route 53. I'm not sure about Microsoft Azure that what is the specialty in it than Heroku and Amazon EC2 Container Service. Anyhow, I will do explore these once again and pick the best suite one for my requirement once I reached this level.

Build and Repositories: I have decided to choose Apache Maven and Git as these are my favorites and also so popular on respectively build and repositories.

Additional Utilities :) - I would like to choose Codacy for code review as their Startup plan will be very helpful to this application. I'm already experienced with Google CheckStyle and SonarQube even I'm looking something on Codacy.

Happy Coding! Suggestions are welcome! :)

Thanks, Ganesa

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related Dropbox posts

Jorge Cortell
Jorge Cortell
Founder & CEO at Kanteron Systems | 1 upvotes 13.4K views
atKanteron SystemsKanteron Systems
Dropbox
Dropbox
Google Drive
Google Drive

We originally used Dropbox as an easy way to store and share documents, but moved to the much more powerful and convenient Google Drive, although we still use Dropbox occasionally.

See more
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HostGator

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A leading provider of web hosting
    Be the first to leave a pro
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    Google Cloud Storage logo

    Google Cloud Storage

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    Durable and highly available object storage service
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    Aliadoc Team
    Aliadoc Team
    at aliadoc.com | 5 upvotes 127.6K views
    atAliadocAliadoc
    React
    React
    Create React App
    Create React App
    CloudFlare
    CloudFlare
    Firebase
    Firebase
    Cloud Functions for Firebase
    Cloud Functions for Firebase
    Google App Engine
    Google App Engine
    Google Cloud Storage
    Google Cloud Storage
    Serverless
    Serverless
    Visual Studio Code
    Visual Studio Code
    Bitbucket
    Bitbucket
    #Aliadoc

    In #Aliadoc, we're exploring the crowdfunding option to get traction before launch. We are building a SaaS platform for website design customization.

    For the Admin UI and website editor we use React and we're currently transitioning from a Create React App setup to a custom one because our needs have become more specific. We use CloudFlare as much as possible, it's a great service.

    For routing dynamic resources and proxy tasks to feed websites to the editor we leverage CloudFlare Workers for improved responsiveness. We use Firebase for our hosting needs and user authentication while also using several Cloud Functions for Firebase to interact with other services along with Google App Engine and Google Cloud Storage, but also the Real Time Database is on the radar for collaborative website editing.

    We generally hate configuration but honestly because of the stage of our project we lack resources for doing heavy sysops work. So we are basically just relying on Serverless technologies as much as we can to do all server side processing.

    Visual Studio Code definitively makes programming a much easier and enjoyable task, we just love it. We combine it with Bitbucket for our source code control needs.

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    DigitalOcean Spaces

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    Scalable Object Storage on DigitalOcean