Django vs Flask vs Laravel

Need advice about which tool to choose?Ask the StackShare community!

Django

25.9K
22.7K
+ 1
3.7K
Flask

13.8K
11.6K
+ 1
1.5K
Laravel

19.8K
15.7K
+ 1
3.5K
Advice on Django, Flask, and Laravel
Needs advice
on
Spring
and
Django

I am a graduate student working as a software engineer in a company. For my personal development, I want to learn web development. I have some experience in Springboot while I was in university. So I want to continue with spring-boot, but I heard about Django. I'm reaching out to the experts here to help me choose a future proof framework. Django or Spring Boot?

Thanks in Advance

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Replies (5)
Recommends
Spring

Kamrul Hasan, Don't choose dying technologies with small communities. How many startups do you think use Spring and Django? Use Google Trends to compare technologies. Study the StackOverflow developer survey and job websites to see what technologies are wanted. Few teams can afford to train you to get up to their level so be a life-long learner. Embrace the dawn of a new industry and become an expert.

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Sulaiman Sanusi
Recommends
Spring

I recommend you stick to Java Spring as you already have experience with the technology, i suggest you master this technology and then if Django seam to be very interesting to you, django is a framework you can easily pickup as python is also easy, you have to probably be able to manage the context switching between a static typed language like Java to dynamic language like python

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Gonzalo Fernández
Recommends

Hi Kamrul,

It really depends on the kind of project and whether you feel more comfortable with Java or Python. Both are excellent frameworks, with a huge community and learning material. I've been working with Spring Boot since I started coding almost and I can assure you it's the perfect combination for Java. The learning curve may be harder that Django, but once you know the basics you're good to go. I can't tell you much about Django but you must now by now that it has a great reputation with Python users. In any case I don't think you can go wrong with any of these two. My advice is, if you are already familiar with the Spring framework, give Spring Boot a try, because you're going to find out that it just makes the whole Spring experience so much easier. Let us know what you chose!

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Christoph Becker
Recommends
Spring
Django

It depends on what you want. Spring is Java-based whereas Django is Python-based. The question rather is Java vs Python. I personally recommend Python as it's shorter and easy to learn. But Java has advantages in really big systems.

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Recommends
Django

Both are in active development and had huge community support. It really depends on you what you are comfortable with. Both are married to their respective languages. I choose Python over Java because of its simplicity and readability. To develop in java you need to write a lot of code. That's how java is. The best part I love with Django is its synchronization with Databases.

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jeeva
Security Engineer at Confidential · | 5 upvotes · 18.7K views
Needs advice
on
PostgreSQL
Flask
and
Django

Hi All - I am currently developing an API in Flask for automating a few of my tasks. I am planning to use Django for consuming the Flask API and for displaying the results. The API will be used by my team as well, so I would like to enforce access controls based on the user logged in. For example, User A can consume the API, but User B can only see the results. Also, I am planning to enforce other controls, such as a user can consume a particular API only once per day. For the Database, I am planning to use PostgreSQL. Request you to share your insights and ideas. Thank you!

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Replies (1)
Sambit Paul
Senior Data Scientist at Altair Medical · | 6 upvotes · 11.2K views
Recommends

So, to limit access to URLs based on users, you will need to use roles for the users. So, there will be groups under which all users need to categorised. Let's say in a Hospital setting, the roles would be "Patients", "Doctors", "Nurses" etc. And all the users will be under these categories. Django has an open source extension "django-role-permissions" which I have used extensively for many of my projects and I can vouch for. It is easy to handle and has good documentation to get started with.

For limiting API calls, you will need to create a table which accounts for the number of times a specific API is called by a user and use that to limit access.

Link to mentioned library: https://github.com/vintasoftware/django-role-permissions

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kristan-dev
Senior Solutions Analyst · | 8 upvotes · 137.6K views

My journey to developing REST APIs started with Flask Restful, and I've found it to be enough for the needs of my project back then. Now that I've started investing more time on personal projects, I've yet to decide if I should move to use Django for writing REST APIs. I often see job posts looking for Python+Django developers, but it's usually for full-stack developers. I'm primarily interested in Data Engineering, so most of my web projects are back end.

Should I continue with what I know (Flask) or move on to Django?

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Replies (1)
Rafael Torres
Technical Lead at 4Agile · | 9 upvotes · 128.4K views

If you want to be a Web developer with knowledge in another frontend and NoSql technology, maybe continue with Flask. However, if you want to create very fast solutions to grow up with a new business and merge these with data analysis and other tools, Django is the answer. Basically read more about the service architecture where you feel more comfortable, Microservice or Monolithic, but please will not married with any because they solve issues to different contexts.

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Eva Maciejko
Fullstack Web developer · | 9 upvotes · 301K views
Needs advice
on
Spring Boot
Laravel
and
ExpressJS

Hello, I am a fullstack web developer. I have been working for a company with Java/ Spring Boot and client-side JavaScript(mainly jQuery, some AngularJS) for the past 4 years. As I wish to now work as a freelancer, I am faced with a dilemma: which stack to choose given my current knowledge and the state of the market?

I've heard PHP is very popular in the freelance world. I don't know PHP. However, I'm sure it wouldn't be difficult to learn since it has many similarities with Java (OOP). It seems to me that Laravel has similarities with Spring Boot (it's MVC and OOP). Also, people say Laravel works well with Vue.js, which is my favorite JS framework.

On the other hand, I already know the Javascript language, and I like Vue.js, so I figure I could go the fullstack Javascript route with ExpressJS. However, I am not sure if these techs are ripe for freelancing (with regards to RAD, stability, reliability, security, costs, etc.) Is it true that Express is almost always used with MongoDB? Because my experience is mostly with SQL databases.

The projects I would like to work on are custom web applications/websites for small businesses. I have developed custom ERPs before and found that Java was a good fit, except for it taking a long time to develop. I cannot make a choice, and I am constantly switching between trying PHP and Node.js/Express. Any real-world advice would be welcome! I would love to find a stack that I enjoy while doing meaningful freelance coding.

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Replies (10)
Recommends
Spring Boot

Hi Eva, As you have solid experience with Spring already, you should jump into freelancing with that. It would be quite stressful to start freelancing with a tech stack you don't know well. Then in the background you can keep learning/practicing an alternative and switch over when you are confident enough (eg. 0.5-1 year later). I think you should learn Laravel as you already like it and find it easier. Express has better performance but that is not required for most of the small freelancer projects.

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Benoît Hubert
JavaScript Instructor at Wild Code School · | 6 upvotes · 237.4K views
Recommends
Spring Boot

I think Patrik and Alex are right: if you're comfortable with Spring Boot already, you'll be more productive right from the start.

If you wish to learn something else besides, both Laravel and Express are good choices. They aren't in the same category of frameworks: Laravel is an all-in-one solution, while Express is more like "build your own stack from different parts". Which implies that you can use whatever you want as a database engine: MySQL or PostgreSQL are perfectly valid choices (in my school, we teach Express with MySQL, because SQL is still a big thing here in France, and a sought-after skill). You can use Sequelize or TypeORM which support all major SQL DBMS.

Express is widely used, but if you're seeking the JavaScript equivalent of Spring Boot or Laravel, you probably want to look at NestJS. The only potential downside is that it's still young, maintained by a small commmunity, compared to those behind Spring Boot and Laravel.

Bottom line: using a stack tech, that you enjoy and are comfortable with, matters. Spring Boot + Vue.js seem perfectly fine to me. But do forget jQuery if you're using Vue.js, React or Angular, because it will definitely bring more harm than good!

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Recommends
ExpressJS

Looking at current technological trends and rise of JavaScript, you cannot go wrong with JavaScript. - There's an abundance of libraries to get most things done - You can use JavaScript for both the frontend and the backend - this allows you potentially share your logic/models/code across both stacks - A dynamic/interpreted language such as JavaScript is great for serverless (there's somewhat of a trend towards serverless aswell - especially in modern projects) - If you like/need static typing, you can always migrate seemlessly to Typescript - VueJS is a lightweight framework (compared to Angular), it has more GitHub stars and most would argue it's easier to work with (beginner friendly). Additionally most modern webapps do not use JQuery anymore (even though a lot of legacy projects continue to do so). You don't need JQuery if you use Vue/Angular/React

Additionally it doesn't seem like performance is a hugely important metric in your scenario, so JavaScript would suffice.

Note: These are all my opinions and what I've seen in the current market when recently searching for jobs.

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Recommends
Spring Boot

I would definitely recommend you to go with Spring Boot + AngularJS + jQuery. Reasons: 1- You have an experience of 4 years with the above-mentioned stack. 2- As you mentioned that you wish to work as a freelancer, your stack is the perfect one for finding good bids with a little less effort than that of PHP + Laravel + Vue.js.

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Hi as someone who employs and select developers i agree with a lot almost sayed but think of what are your strengths and where you are or better where your customers are. If you search for big enterprise projects spring boot is ok sql is must and html css as well. if you want to go more to internet related companies (like airbnb, what sup, facebook ) or similar (and not asia) then react is a must node js as well. The libraries tools etc which are used you need to adopt fast. If asia then VUE is a must. but if you like small projects with individuals or like wordpress or similar then you can learn php but i think in 2020 it is wasted time. Same for python in that area. and i also see that we often have problem that developer at least must understand docker docker compose better as it works with kubernetes ,.. just my 5 cents

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Alex Spieslechner
Recommends
Spring Boot

in order to stay employable, I'd work with something you can deliver with. if I'd be your client and you'd have to get comfortable with a new stack, I would 100% not pay you for this startup time. learn new stuff in your free-time. or set aside time for learning.

that said, if you want to reorientate, php (even though i personally hate it) is extremely wide spread. but so are java and nodejs. so I'm not a fan of that argument... i recommend building something in each language, and see what you enjoy more. for me it was nodejs, because I already enjoy frontend JavaScript, and appreciate the ecosystem and community.

regarding expressjs and mongodb: yes, it is a goto solution for a lot of tutorials, because its as simple as it gets. especially wben using something like monk. BUT if you want to use mysql, posgres or similar, check out TypeORM, Prism or another ORM-like solution. you can use any db with express, and there's plenty of abstraction layers, which make your life easier. but i noticed that expressjs does a lot less "holding hands" compared to .net core (c#), or laravel (php). can be a pro or a con.

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Rubin Thomas
Software Cloud Developer at RUBIN THOMAS · | 4 upvotes · 177.3K views
Recommends
Python
PHP
Perl

As a developer myself, I would recommend you not to restrict yourself to JAVA, PHP or any other language. New Tools/languages keep coming every day. If you do plan to move to freelancing. PHP has a lot of options in the freelance space and a lot of competition too.

Learning PHP is as simple as learning any other language. It depends merely on your interest.

Personally if you can code, you should not restrict yourself. I have had to code in many languages, PHP, Perl, shell script, Python, Java, Javascript, Ruby etc... I would keep your developing skills and logic, algorithms etc.. and increase your knowledge and experience in the different languages.

I agree with you JAVA is a lot more time consuming. But it also has its enterprise level scope.

At the same time learning a new language should not be a barrier for you to stop exploring what's out there and keeping your skills up to date. Learning new technologies should be your primary focus and getting project out of your stack helps you build a good reputation.

There are many options for you to pursue. Having an open mindset will help you move forward. If you look to learn now, you are setting yourself up for a brighter future.

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I like fullstack freelancers who stacks are clean as one of below

  1. PHP (laravel ) + Jquery + Bootstrap

  2. Python(Django) + Angular JS or VueJS

  3. NODEJS + REACTJS

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Recommends
ExpressJS

Hey There, I would recommend going fullstack javascript since you already have experience with javascript on the front end it would be very easy to pickup node and express js. You can use sql with node and express if you please, but mongo is pretty easy to get going with.

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Ahmed Gamal

Please, try to work with your comfortable stack, here is some recommendation

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Needs advice
on
Spring Framework
NestJS
and
Django

Hi there, I'm deciding the technology to use in my project.

I need to build software that has:

  • Login
  • Register
  • Main View (access to a user account, News, General Info, Business hours, software, and parts section).
  • Account Preferences.
  • Web Shop for Parts (Support, Download Sections, Ticket System).

The most critical functionality is a WebSocket that connects between a car that sends real-time data through serial communication, and a server performs diagnosis on the car and sends the results back to the user.

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Replies (3)
Recommends
NestJS

You can use NestJs with microservice architecture.where you can also use socket.io for web socket. you can use MongoDB (For real-time data) & MySQL for customer management.if you don't want to implement websocket.you can use firebase.it gives realtime database & firestore.which can handle millions of connections and scale it up.

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Amit Parameshwar
NodeJS Intern at CartRabbit · | 3 upvotes · 237.3K views
Recommends
Node.js

Just a simple Node.JS app with templating engine for UI can be sufficient for what you want to achieve.

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Spring boot with Spring Security[JWT], Websocket, Thymeleaf or Mustache, and styling with Bootstrap.

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Muhammad Shaheer khan
Freelancer at Freelancer.com · | 9 upvotes · 285.1K views
Needs advice
on
Node.js
Magento
and
Django

Currently, I am a university student, and it is my second last semester with a major in Computer science. I want to start my career in full-stack web development. I know Python with Django + PHP with Laravel, and my focus is on learning MERN stack. I am a little bit confused as to which technology I should choose: Django or Magento or MERN stack.

#newbie

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Replies (2)
Recommends
React

I suggest you to go with MERN Stack (Mongo,express,react,Node). As you know python and django which is a plus point because you can use python and node as your backend and for front-end use react(easy to learn) and database of your choice.(Mongo or SQL)

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Moinul Moin
Recommends
Node.js

GO For MERN Stack... brother

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Needs advice
on
Django
and
ASP.NET Core

As a medium level .Net programmer trying to implementing a website, I decided to go through the Asp.Net Core. I found some tutorials on the web and started learning; however, I faced a problem. Even though I have been working with .Net and C# (mostly with unity game engine, which led to a quite amazing mobile game, published on a Persian app store) for two years or even more, by start learning Asp.Net Core, I found out that I do not know .Net as much as I expected. There were some things I should have learned before.

I searched for other frameworks, and Django was a popular one. Besides, I have planned to learn Python for machine learning. The website I want to make (with a small team) is nearly similar to Khan Academy. (We are going to use React for front-end)

So, What should I do? Continue working on .Net core with its amazing new features, or start getting into the Python and Django?

Your advice accompanied by reasons will be greatly appreciated!

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Replies (6)
Recommends
Django

Having worked with many J2EE database applications in the past, I now turn to Django if I can and the project allows it as it is so quick to get up and running. It has a logical workflow and organized structure and it comes with a high level of security (if you import the appropriate backends). If you are wanting to incorporate python-based data processing (or cython), it is relatively easy to write a backend plugin. I have found it more stable with updates than other frameworks (particularly compared to the NPM world such as React which so often descends into dependency hell when a version of something is updated). One hassle worth mentioning is the database migrations support which can sometimes mess up during development but there are workarounds. With a React frontend, you would be using the Django REST Framework (https://www.django-rest-framework.org/) so you may find that you have to overwrite a lot of the methods here as the defaults are fairly basic CRUD operations which don't really support nested relationships very well. I don't have any experience with .Net so I can't give a comparison except of course, the obvious one, portability, as Python is platform-independent. PS, I would recommend Vue over React also for a well organized front-end.

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Recommends
Django

I find myself in the opposite boat, I have made commercial websites with Django and now find myself learning ASP.NET. My recommendation comes with the following caveats... regardless of direction the learning will happen. Django is a very battery included framework, so the initial process will be painless, I found that documentation and support for more advanced use cases to be fairly easy to get support.

I personally found Django pretty nice to work with.

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Recommends
ASP.NET Core

You can get done what you want with just about any modern framework and language.

Django is fast and easy to learn but as your website grows you will need more and more community apps whose release cycles do not keep up with Django. Unless you are willing to work on the community apps, Django may not be for you.

Compare the active community sizes of Django apps to Ruby on Rails apps and you'll see very active communities with Ruby on Rails and small Django communities. Don't switch to Ruby on Rails though--it is a small, dying community of enthusiasts.

ASP.NET Core is a great backend framework, the community is large and you can always find answers; however, according to the StackOverflow developer survey, it is not desirable for the majority of programmers. I still use it though because my background evolved from C to C++ and then to C#. I also like the Microsoft world.

I've programmed a lot using Angular and some React but am switching to Vue.js which is much easier to learn and faster to code in. Be sure to use TypeScript with Vue.js. Just watch the video on the Vue home page to see how fast he can code using Vue.

But do you really want to code a website from scratch? If not, try WordPress Elementor. It may save you tons of time.

For mobile, use Google Flutter. In my 35 years of professional programming I've never seen anything more elegant, easy to learn, well documented and beautiful than Flutter. From one a single base you can target both Android and IOS and soon Web. You can also develop in Android Studio which means your screen real estate requirements are small so you don't need two monitors.

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Recommends
Firebase

I recommend you use a framework such as Firebase instead of implementing your own backend server for the website.

I found that Firebase enables me to build websites more quickly since it takes care of the backend for me so most of my development time is building the front-end (using React in your case).

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Recommends
ASP.NET Core

Go with the ASP.NET Core. It is a very mature technology now and there are tons of documentation, tutorials and support you can find online. Also ASP.NET Core Web API plays quite well with the React. It is easy to implement the entire back-end in .NET Core (APIs, authentication, database access layer...) and if you need any third party package, I'm pretty sure you will find and implement in a form of a NuGet package. Who knows, maybe one day you'll need to create a mobile app and with a fully functional Web API, it would be more-less easy task to build a mobile app on top of it.

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Ilya Lebedev
Recommends
Django

If you're going to learn Python anyway, Django project will boost your learning process. Since you're going to use React , you only neet to create REST API. Basic API can be created with Django rather easy.

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Needs advice
on
Node.js
and
Django

I have learned both Python and JavaScript. I also tried my hand at Django. But i found it difficult to work with Django, on frontend its Jinja format is very confusing and limited. I have not tried Node.js yet and unsure which tool to go ahead with. I want an internship as soon as possible so please answer keeping that in mind.

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Replies (7)
Recommends
Django

If you are currently not working my first suggestion is to study both the frameworks and get a good grasp of those. If you didn't get confident with Django in the first place you should reconsider going back and study more. Get a video course with some code-along and produce some simple application you can showcase on your interviews. If you already took a course take a different one. Another trainer could be more effective and you could experience something new with different excercises. There are lots of both free and paid courses out there. When you will get confident with Django get your feet wet with Node.js because it surely worth it. Node is very different from Django from some perspective, it looks more like an asynchronous version of Flask to me. Be sure to have a good knowledge of ES6 first, because it will be really useful to understand the Node best practices. Study as much as you can now if you are not working. It will supercharge you for the future...

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Max Musing
Founder & CEO at BaseDash · | 10 upvotes · 243.5K views
Recommends
Node.js
at

From my experience of the early startup world, a majority of companies these days use Node.js. Python and Go are the next biggest languages, but significantly smaller than Node.

However, if you're having trouble with the front end aspect of Django, using Node probably won't make that easier for you. You'll have a lot more options between front end frameworks (React, Vue.js, Angular 2) , but they'll definitely take more time to learn than Django's templating system.

Think about whether you want to focus on front end or back end for now, and make a decision from there.

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George Krachtopoulos
Recommends
Node.js

I had the same question myself a few months ago. I finally chose Node.js, and it was one of the best options I did back then. From when I started programming, I always believed that Python was for me the best language, secure and stable. However, it is not flexible for web development, there are more packages & libraries that are built and work only with JavaScript / TypeScript, and the community, resources & support is much bigger. I was also fascinated by the Django ORM, which I still am, & the admin interface. But those are things, that can be replaces by other tools, such as TypeORM, and the admin interface was not needed at all finally for my case. I know understand that Python is not the language that I should use everywhere and every time, but I can say that it is really good for algorithms, computer science, maths, statistics, analytics & AI. To be honest, I chose TypeScript (TS) with Node.js & Express, because it has auto-completion and "strict" code checking. I hope this helps you, and let you take a look at various aspects of choosing a programming language to work with.

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Yousuf Jawwad
Principal Software Architect at Breu Inc. · | 4 upvotes · 173K views
Recommends
Jinja

Jinja is a template rendering engine and you will encounter some sort of template rendering engine in each language. Jinja is a pretty standard tool and almost every language has some sort of Jinja equivalent. Ruby has Liquid, Node has Nunjucks, Java has Jinjava, Go's default templating engine is easy to pick up if you know Jinja, Helm charts are easier to pick if know Jinja . So learning Jinja is a good thing.

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Recommends
Node.js

I would suggest to go with js, it's the craze now when you enter into the stack it has variety of options and tools that you can adopt , and more than that the demand for js engineers is exponentially increasing and js can do magic in any type of application or architecture.

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Recommends
Django

If you already know some django stuff you should keep that learning path. And for the job if you really want an internship you should learn to make rest APIs using django or nodejs, and a front end that consumes those APIs using some framework

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Recommends
Django

Actually, you could get very good solution with implementing BE and admin panel with Django and FE with React.js or Vue.js. it will provide you a pretty flexible and powerful environment.

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Needs advice
on
Spring Boot
Django
and
Android SDK

I've just finished my Masters degree and I am looking at routes into developing my Java knowledge.

The University I studied at requested that all practical Java assignments were done in Java Swing and as such I have a strong understanding in that area of development. Looking at job prospects, many employers are now looking for Java Spring or Android developers.

The plan is to move away from Java SE and skill up in Android development. I was planning on learning Spring Boot to gain exposure in web application development, however looking at StackShare, Django seems to be the more attractive choice for developers.

Does anyone have any advice on which routes/stacks would be the most advisable to adopt. If Spring is not receiving as much exposure or support as Django, is it worth adding to my stack?

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Replies (2)
Recommends
Spring Boot

Spring is generally more an enterprise solution, while I see Django being more startup oriented. Django is lightweight and fast (development time, not runtime!). Spring seems to have more focus on microservice architecture than django, if that matters to you at all. Starting your project in Django, it automatically creates a backend 'admin panel' for you to use and customize. You will not find this in the more serious Spring Boot.

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Jeffrey Dabo
Software Engineer at Jeffrey Dabo · | 7 upvotes · 147.9K views
Recommends
Spring Boot

Though Java is a strong language and basically the first language to be used in Mobile Development (Android), the framework Spring Boot is not as modern as the Django framework which is based on one of the most popular languages today - Python. Moreover the Python language is far more simpler in syntax and just as powerful as Java. However, Java has scaled up it's performance and the Spring Boot framework can support dynamic web development as well as android development. Whichever way you choose to go, there will be no regrets - trust me.

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Tony Valdes Mendez
President at SmartBrite Technologies · | 3 upvotes · 101.8K views
Needs advice
on
Ruby
Node.js
and
Laravel

Hello... I hope everyone is ok amid today's global situation.

I'm trying to choose the perfect stack for a new mobile app project that resembles the super apps like GoJek & Grab.

I have gone to BUILTWITH and seen what their stack on all fronts.....however, and even though, they both differ from one another, I'm still looking for the perfect stack that will give us PERFORMANCE & SCALABILITY for years to come.

Your comments & suggestions are very important to us, so please share your thoughts.

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Replies (4)

We recommend Laravel over Ruby on Rails (Ruby) and Express.js (JavaScript/Node.js). We chose Laravel ourselves for our own internal software project, recently after comparing these same 3 software frameworks. In selecting Laravel, we chose to build our app using the software language PHP. PHP has the largest market share of all the web-based software languages (close to 80% of all websites use PHP). Also, Laravel is the fastest-growing software framework based on PHP making it a wise choice.

We also plan to integrate WordPress and WooCommerce later with our Laravel web-app. WordPress and WooCommerce like Laravel are all built using PHP. WordPress is the most popular Content Management System in the world. This will allow us to build out the front-end marketing website in WordPress. Also, we plan to offer subscriptions and sell products. For this, we will use WooCommerce. WooCommerce is the most used e-commerce platform in the world. We’ll be able to use our same Laravel developers to extend our app to WordPress and WooCommerce. By standardizing on PHP, we’ll be able to use the same software developers on all 3 platforms. PHP’s large market share will be an asset to us as we start recruiting talented software developers.

Lastly, we are gaining access to a fast-growing and awesome community that supports Laravel. Before we made our decision, I personally met Laravel’s founder Taylor Otwell along with several of his team members. After meeting with the Laravel team at Laracon US in New York City and learning more about the direction they are going with the framework, we’re confident we made the right decision.

To read the longer version of this answer where we go into more detail behind our recommendation, visit https://rackless.com/laravel-rails-expressjs

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Oded Arbel
Recommends
Vert.x

Before I recommend a tool, I think it is important to look at your requirements and capabilities - as you have looked at 3 very different tools: different programming languages, different implementation strategies and different target audience. It sounds like you don't already have a set of dedicated developers, so it is likely that your choice should be mainly driven by how easy it is to get developers that are familiar with the tools - so I'm going to list some considerations that I think you should review, starting with what I believe would be the most important for your bootstrap process:

  1. Mindshare: how easy it is to get developers that are familiar with the technology and can immediately start working on your project. This is definitely where Node.js shines - Javascript is one of the fastest growing languages and Node.js played a huge part in this. I would bet that wherever you are located, Javascript developers would be the easiest to come by.

  2. Fit for purpose: from your description we can understand that you are looking at a backend technology to implement some sort of REST API for a mobile app. The 3 different options you offered each fit on a different place on such a stack: Ruby is a programming language and not even a service framework - if you choose it, you then have to choose a server implementation and REST framework (and there are a lot, mostly as Ruby has a standard API for connecting a web server and application frameworks, and so this space has blown up) it used to be that Rails was the most popular, so you may choose that, but the interest in it has waned a bit in recent years; Node.js is a server framework, but it also has a dominant application framework called Express, that is geared well to your usage, so you'd likely work with that; Laravel is an application framework - it uses the PHP programming language, whose use has declined a bit in recent years, and was originally built for MVC type applications - though it has workflows for REST APIs and would probably work well for you as well.

  3. Scalability: while this is probably the least significant issue at the moment (when it gets to a point where the backend service is your bottleneck, you'd likely have enough resources for a rewrite), and also the most dependent on factors that you didn't specify and are hard to estimate (such as: session complexity; amounts of data; sensitivity to locality; sensitivity to latency), it is still worthy to address it. Unfortunately, I don't have any good news: Ruby is notoriously bad at getting the best performance (the current BKM for milking performance from a Ruby codebase is to run the app on the Java virtual machine); Node.js has severe memory limitations that will make it very hard to scale if your backend needs to do a lot of work (I have a very personal and troubling experience with this issue); and PHP has as many scalability optimization strategies as there are PHP developers (this is not a good thing).

My suggestion to you as to how to proceed can be summarized to this prioritized list of options: 1. Get a good head developer with a lot of experience and let them choose the best tool - they'd likely go with what they know, which is likely to be a good choice - and if not, when scalability will become an issue, you could rewrite. 2. Choose something (likely Node.js) and don't worry about scalability - see (1) above. 3. Use Vert.x: it is a highly scalable application and service framework that offers great performance as well as a lot of tools to solve data scalability, locality and latency, and it works with multiple programming languages, such as Javascript and Ruby.

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Recommends
Rails

That's a really ambitious project. So you're going to want to move as quickly as possible. That means choosing a software stack that will allow you to move the most quickly. Of the ones you've listed, Ruby (Ruby on Rails, more precisely) will give you that. There are probably other options that would allow you to move even more quickly than Rails, but developers for those more advanced stacks are much more expensive, and hard to find.

Rails can and does scale to millions of users. It's not necessarily easy, but if you're running a successful app, you'll be able to afford people to help you scale out when you reach that point. But if you choose a slower framework (or have bad developers) you won't even reach the point of needing scalability.

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Sourabh Bagrecha
Recommends
Node.js

Node.js would be the best choice among all, you can compare all 3 of them on Stackshare and you will find that Node.js is on the top on almost every aspect, and since your focus is primarily on Performance and Scalability you won't regret after choosing Node.js. Also, the JavaScript open-source community has made a lot of effort and created numerous packages that will give you the speed and smooth execution of your project you need. Though your question was regarding backend, but if you choose JavaScript(Node.js) at your backend, then you can have a cross-functional team that can work on both, frontend as well as backend because JavaScript is everywhere, React Native for Android and iOS apps, React.js for single page web apps and Node.js ofcourse for your backend. And I don't have to tell you how much easier it would be to code and manage in a single language to build your complete system end-to-end. I hope it helps.

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Decisions about Django, Flask, and Laravel
Chose
Rails
over
Django

I have used both the tools . Both of them are super awesome , very reliable and their learning curve is also super easy. But, the reason I choose Ruby on Rails over Django is the fact that the dependency injection is super easy in Rails than Django. What I mean is the fact that, Django requires a lot of import statement to do a lot of work, which remembering is not so easy and even after that you may need to write a lot of code. But Ruby on Rails uses gem to add addition feature or dependency in the project. Which requires just copying the gem statement from github and pasting it in the Gemfile, then running bundle install(these days just bundle works super fine). And there you are with the new feature in your app. You can see this with the example of Authentication, where in Django you require several steps like adding class based views and many more, but in rails it's just as easy as installing the 'devise' gem . And if you want to make it beautiful use bootstrap_template gem to make it look prettier. Now with Rails 6 , Rails is a total developer's fervent friend because it has come up with features like Action Mail and Action Text.

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washie mugo
Chose
Django
over
Laravel

i find python quite resourceful. given the bulk of libraries that python has and the trends of the tech i find django which runs on python to be the framework of choice to the upcoming web services and application. Laravel on the other hand which is powered by PHP is also quite resourceful and great for startups and common web applications.

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Since I came from python I had two choices: #django or #flask. It felt like it was a better idea to go for #django considering I was building a blogging platform, this is kind of what #django was made for. On the other hand, #rails seems to be a fantastic framework to get things done. Although I do not regret any of my time spent on developing with #django I want to give #rails a try some day in the future for the sake of curiosity.

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Ing. Alvaro Rodríguez Scelza
Software Systems Engineer at Ripio · | 8 upvotes · 186.4K views

Decided to change all my stack to microsoft technologies for they behave just great together. It is very easy to set up and deploy projects using visual studio and azure. Visual studio is also an amazing IDE, if not the best, when used for C#, it allows you to work in every aspect of your software.

Visual studio templates for ASP.NET MVC are the best I've found compared to django, rails, laravel, and others.

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Christopher Wray
Web Developer at Soltech LLC · | 6 upvotes · 158.5K views

When I started on this project as the sole developer, I was new to web development and I was looking at all of the web frameworks available for the job. I had some experience with Ruby on Rails and I had looked into .net for a bit, but when I found Laravel, it felt like the best framework for me to get the product to market. What made me choose Laravel was the easy to read documentation and active community. Rails had great documentation, but lacked some features built in that I wanted out of the box, while .net had a ton of video documentation tutorials, but nothing as straightforward as Laravels. So far, I am happy with the decision I made, and looking forward to the website release!

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We initially though we would use Django because it seemed to have a lot of the things we needed out of the box. After a bit of research we realized that using Flask would be a better option since it is more flexible and would be lighter for our purposes. Having set up our REST api using Flask we believe that we did make the right decision. We found that the flexibility of Flask along with the many extensions available for it to be very appealing. We were able to add the functionality we needed without much difficulty thanks to the quality of the extensions and their documentation.

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We are planning to use Django since it is more feature-rich out of the box and will help us get our applications' backend up and running as soon as possible. Since we are planning to use Python as our primary language for our machine learning, using a python based REST API is going to be really beneficial for us in the early stages. Even though, both the developers on the team have not worked with Django, are confident that it will be able to provide us with a rich experience given the large community that exists. We might go over this decision as we make progress, and design software to accommodate that.

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David Moss

Flask is light weight and not as opinionated as Django but it then leaves a lot of the glue to do. Having worked with both before nothing beats the great ORM of Django to manage the data connections. Add to this the large range of libraries like the REST framework and south migrations makes rapid development both easy and enjoyable.

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Pros of Django
Pros of Flask
Pros of Laravel
  • 628
    Rapid development
  • 465
    Open source
  • 398
    Great community
  • 351
    Easy to learn
  • 262
    Mvc
  • 213
    Beautiful code
  • 209
    Elegant
  • 191
    Free
  • 189
    Great packages
  • 176
    Great libraries
  • 66
    Restful
  • 64
    Comes with auth and crud admin panel
  • 64
    Powerful
  • 58
    Great documentation
  • 56
    Great for web
  • 41
    Python
  • 36
    Great orm
  • 33
    Great for api
  • 26
    All included
  • 21
    Web Apps
  • 20
    Fast
  • 17
    Used by top startups
  • 15
    Clean
  • 14
    Easy setup
  • 14
    Sexy
  • 11
    Convention over configuration
  • 8
    ORM
  • 7
    Allows for very rapid development with great libraries
  • 7
    The Django community
  • 5
    Great MVC and templating engine
  • 5
    Its elegant and practical
  • 4
    Easy Structure , useful inbuilt library
  • 4
    Have not found anything that it can't do
  • 4
    King of backend world
  • 4
    Fast prototyping
  • 4
    Full stack
  • 4
    Easy to develop end to end AI Models
  • 4
    Mvt
  • 3
    Cross-Platform
  • 3
    Batteries included
  • 3
    Easy
  • 3
    Easy to use
  • 2
    Full-Text Search
  • 2
    Map
  • 2
    Modular
  • 2
    Very quick to get something up and running
  • 2
    Many libraries
  • 2
    Python community
  • 2
    Just the right level of abstraction
  • 2
    Scaffold
  • 2
    Great peformance
  • 2
    Zero code burden to change databases
  • 1
    Easy to change database manager
  • 0
    Node js
  • 306
    Lightweight
  • 267
    Python
  • 211
    Minimal
  • 142
    Open source
  • 97
    Documentation
  • 65
    Easy to use
  • 53
    Easy to setup and get it going
  • 52
    Well designed
  • 47
    Easy to develop and maintain applications
  • 44
    Easy to get started
  • 16
    Beautiful code
  • 15
    Rapid development
  • 13
    Powerful
  • 12
    Awesome
  • 12
    Expressive
  • 11
    Speed
  • 10
    Flexibilty
  • 10
    Love it
  • 9
    Easy to integrate
  • 9
    Get started quickly
  • 9
    Simple to use
  • 8
    For it flexibility
  • 8
    Perfect for small to large projects with superb docs.
  • 8
    Customizable
  • 7
    Flask
  • 7
    Flexibilty and easy to use
  • 7
    Productive
  • 6
    Not JS
  • 5
    Secured
  • 5
    User friendly
  • 4
    Unopinionated
  • 1
    Secure
  • 509
    Clean architecture
  • 370
    Growing community
  • 344
    Composer friendly
  • 318
    Open source
  • 300
    The only framework to consider for php
  • 197
    Mvc
  • 191
    Quickly develop
  • 157
    Dependency injection
  • 145
    Application architecture
  • 132
    Embraces good community packages
  • 60
    Write less, do more
  • 54
    Restful routing
  • 48
    Orm (eloquent)
  • 45
    Artisan scaffolding and migrations
  • 44
    Database migrations & seeds
  • 35
    Awesome
  • 33
    Great documentation
  • 25
    Promotes elegant coding
  • 25
    Awsome, Powerfull, Fast and Rapid
  • 24
    Build Apps faster, easier and better
  • 22
    JSON friendly
  • 22
    Easy to learn, scalability
  • 21
    Eloquent ORM
  • 21
    Most easy for me
  • 20
    Modern PHP
  • 19
    Test-Driven
  • 19
    Blade Template
  • 18
    Beautiful
  • 13
    Security
  • 12
    Based on SOLID
  • 11
    Clean Documentation
  • 11
    Simple
  • 11
    Cool
  • 10
    Convention over Configuration
  • 10
    Easy to attach Middleware
  • 9
    Easy Request Validatin
  • 8
    Fast
  • 8
    Get going quickly straight out of the box. BYOKDM
  • 8
    Laravel + Cassandra = Killer Framework
  • 8
    Easy to use
  • 8
    Simpler
  • 8
    Its just wow
  • 7
    Less dependencies
  • 7
    Simplistic , easy and faster
  • 7
    Super easy and powerful
  • 7
    Friendly API
  • 6
    Great customer support
  • 6
    Its beautiful to code in
  • 5
    The only "cons" is wrong! No static method just Facades
  • 5
    Easy
  • 5
    Fast and Clarify framework
  • 5
    Active Record
  • 5
    Php7
  • 5
    Speed
  • 4
    Eloquent
  • 4
    Easy views handling and great ORM
  • 4
    Minimum system requirements
  • 4
    Laravel Mix
  • 4
    Composer
  • 4
    Laragon
  • 3
    Ease of use
  • 3
    Intuitive usage
  • 3
    Laravel Nova
  • 3
    Laravel Spark
  • 3
    Laravel casher
  • 3
    Laravel Passport
  • 3
    Laravel Horizon and Telescope
  • 3
    Laravel Forge and Envoy
  • 3
    Cashier with Braintree and Stripe
  • 2
    Touch heart artisan
  • 2
    Scout
  • 2
    Heart touch
  • 2
    Like heart beat
  • 2
    Rapid development
  • 2
    Laravel love live long

Sign up to add or upvote prosMake informed product decisions

Cons of Django
Cons of Flask
Cons of Laravel
  • 25
    Underpowered templating
  • 19
    Underpowered ORM
  • 18
    Autoreload restarts whole server
  • 15
    URL dispatcher ignores HTTP method
  • 10
    Internal subcomponents coupling
  • 7
    Not nodejs
  • 7
    Admin
  • 6
    Configuration hell
  • 3
    Python
  • 3
    Not as clean and nice documentation like Laravel
  • 3
    Bloated admin panel included
  • 3
    Not typed
  • 2
    Overwhelming folder structure
  • 1
    InEffective Multithreading
  • 10
    Not JS
  • 7
    Context
  • 3
    Not fast
  • 42
    PHP
  • 28
    Too many dependency
  • 20
    Slower than the other two
  • 16
    A lot of static method calls for convenience
  • 13
    Too many include
  • 10
    Heavy
  • 7
    Bloated
  • 6
    Laravel
  • 5
    Confusing
  • 4
    Does not work well for file uploads in Shared Hosting
  • 3
    Too underrated
  • 2
    Not fast with MongoDB
  • 1
    Difficult to learn
  • 1
    Not using SOLID principles

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