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Dropwizard vs Node.js: What are the differences?

Dropwizard: Java framework for developing ops-friendly, high-performance, RESTful web services. Dropwizard is a sneaky way of making fast Java web applications. Dropwizard pulls together stable, mature libraries from the Java ecosystem into a simple, light-weight package that lets you focus on getting things done; Node.js: A platform built on Chrome's JavaScript runtime for easily building fast, scalable network applications. Node.js uses an event-driven, non-blocking I/O model that makes it lightweight and efficient, perfect for data-intensive real-time applications that run across distributed devices.

Dropwizard and Node.js can be categorized as "Frameworks (Full Stack)" tools.

"Quick and easy to get a new http service going" is the primary reason why developers consider Dropwizard over the competitors, whereas "Npm" was stated as the key factor in picking Node.js.

Dropwizard and Node.js are both open source tools. It seems that Node.js with 35.5K GitHub stars and 7.78K forks on GitHub has more adoption than Dropwizard with 7.25K GitHub stars and 3.04K GitHub forks.

Uber Technologies, Netflix, and Twitter are some of the popular companies that use Node.js, whereas Dropwizard is used by Yammer, Opower, and ClassPass. Node.js has a broader approval, being mentioned in 4102 company stacks & 4028 developers stacks; compared to Dropwizard, which is listed in 51 company stacks and 12 developer stacks.

Advice on Dropwizard and Node.js
Needs advice
on
Next.jsNext.jsNode.jsNode.js
and
Vue.jsVue.js

As a newbie, trying to code an Avatar AI app from scratch - (I'm familiar with setting up the backend APIs on Flask), but blocked on choosing the frontend. Which of these JavaScript frameworks are preferred for development with Flask. Also, are there any UI tools / low-code tools which make development easy?

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Replies (1)
Recommends

I don't say that is preferred, but I think Vue.js is friendly for those having first contact with this kind of technology, also I would recommend checking Quasar framework (vue.js based).

Quasar introduction: https://quasar.dev/introduction-to-quasar

Pure Vuejs (Free) 27min: https://vueschool.io/courses/vuejs-fundamentals

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Needs advice
on
Next.jsNext.js
and
Node.jsNode.js

Hello, I'm trying to build an auction app with solidity and React but I need some server to handle data and internal logic and I don't know what tool to use for the backend for these reasons:

  1. when just using react and solidity it's not fast.
  2. when using Django and web3py, I can't transfer money with Metamask.

I've heard about Next.js and Node.js as the backend but I cant decide. I would appreciate any help.

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Replies (1)
Justin Rice
DevOps Engineer at Indigo AG · | 5 upvotes · 24.4K views
Recommends

The real question here is: "What is the best way to deploy a decentralized application with a React front-end."

Building a decentralized application and integrating things such as Metamask require you to write smart contracts. This process is language agnostic as long as the smart contract is written and deployed to the chosen blockchain correctly.

Using classic Full-Stack HTTP Application frameworks like Django will no longer work because when we create something with Django, the server is centralized, defeating the purpose of the Blockchain architecture.

That being said, now the question is, what programming language do you want to use to deploy this decentralized application? - https://eth-brownie.readthedocs.io/en/stable/ - is a Python framework for writing smart contracts.

As you have already learned and built with React, you might be better off sticking with the same runtime. NodeJS does have frameworks for deploying decentralized applications called the truffle suite: https://trufflesuite.com/.

This is a whole set of tools for writing decentralized applications using JavaScript and TypeScript.

Hope this helps.

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Bogdan Pop
Needs advice
on
.NET.NETNode.jsNode.js
and
SpringSpring

Hello, I am trying to learn a backend framework besides Node.js. I am not sure what to pick between ASP.NET Core (C#) and Spring Boot (Java). Any advice, any suggestion is highly appreciated. I am planning to build only Web APIs (no desktop applications or something like that). One thing to mention is that I have no experience in Java or C#. I am trying to learn one of those 2 and stick to it.

UPDATE: The project I am trying to build is a SaaS using microservices that supports multi tenancy.

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Replies (3)
Dominik Liebler
Lead Software Engineer · | 9 upvotes · 57.5K views
Recommends

I'd recommend to learn Spring as it is very widespread in the industry and provides a lot of easy integration into most of the common backend tech stacks. Rather than learning Java you could look into Kotlin. It's a very consistent, stable and well-thought language in my opinion and not as verbose as Java. Many problems can be solved with Kotlin in a clear and elegant way while also always having the option to use data structures and libs in JVM. It is also has a very good support in Spring.

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Recommends

Why not pick Django or Flask (both Python)

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Lionel Cawood
Technical Team Lead at inTime Agile Logistics · | 3 upvotes · 28.3K views
Recommends

I have worked in a Spring environment for many years and I still love working with it. Super quick to get a base application running and get coding, thanks to Spring Boot's easy and straight forward integration with Tomcat. However, I will try and answer this question from another perspective: look at topics such as popularity of the language, average statistics on community contribution to their repositories and hiring availability from companies. If you are going down the API route for backend, leverege on your experience in the Node world by looking into ExpressJS (or even NestJS). The JavaScript world is really excellerating at a lightning speed, and I could recommend exploring those worlds a bit more, should it be a comfort level for you. However, my biased answer is tryout Java, followed by Spring afterwards. No disrespect to any .NET developers out there, as there are a few topics in there which are fantastically implemented.

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Needs advice
on
Node.jsNode.jsPostgreSQLPostgreSQL
and
Spring BootSpring Boot

I've been approached by a business consultant for programming a website + web application for his client, which is a logistics company. The web application will have a tracking system for tracking their GPS enabled fleet (400 tricks).

Kindly advise me which scaleable stack can I use for the back-end. I'm planning to use React for the front-end.

And by back-end, I also include the database. I'm considering PostgreSQL as the database system.

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Replies (3)
Damir N
Full-Stack Developer / Team Leader / Solution Architect at WaveAccess · | 5 upvotes · 50.4K views

Spring is a good decision for your needs, but you should build correct microservice architecture for good scaling. Work with database can be easy with ORM (e.g. Hibernate) and migrations (e.g. Liquibase) If you need the best performance and scaling on frontend, you can use Angular or React.

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Michael Barefield

Spring documentation is great. It makes it easy to learn and teach others when your application continues to grow.

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Yes, all these technologies could be used to solve these type of problems.

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Farrukh Zeeshan
Senior Immigration Consultant · | 6 upvotes · 41.2K views
Needs advice
on
LaravelLaravel
and
Node.jsNode.js

What should be used Node.js or Laravel to create a course search portal having about 50K courses, where users will create a profile and enter their academic credentials, scores, language tests, fee range, subject area, etc, and the system will filter and suggest courses meeting the entry requirements and other criteria. The applicant will then shortlist courses, he should be able to compare courses, apply for courses, upload documents and fill in application details, etc.

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Replies (1)
Peter Forret
Technical Director at Brightfish · | 4 upvotes · 28.6K views
Recommends
on
LaravelLaravel

It's not a fair comparison. Laravel is a PHP web framework, Node is a web server runtime around JS. The question should be either:

  • PHP or Node? => take what you know/can work fast in
  • Laravel or ExpressJS/MeteorJS => take what you know/can work fast in

If it were up to me, I'd choose Laravel because I know it and can work fast in it :-)

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Shanover Saiyed
Software Engineer (Web) · | 4 upvotes · 71.2K views
Needs advice
on
LaravelLaravel
and
Node.jsNode.js

I'm working as a full stack web developer and have been given an opportunity to re-frame the whole website which is written in PHP and JavaScript. Our website is required to be fast, efficient, having good analytics, easy to maintain and rework, and subject to frequent changes. It would be handling some medium size files like resumes, video recordings, etc. So I am thinking of changing the tech stack but confused for which backend to choose for the long run. Which back-end would prove to be better in terms of learning, development, and maintenance?

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Replies (2)
Recommends
on
Node.jsNode.js

If it was me, then I would go with node.js because it has huge a number of packages,community,support & good dev experience and learning curve is also not that steep, if coupled with express.js, its gonna be efficient and fast in serving web requests, and if we adopt good design patterns and follow best practices, I guess it will be easy to maintain it as well, and for storing resumes, video rec etc.., I would use assest management tools like cloudinary etc.., rather than storing in db, coz Its gonna be much more faster this way.

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Recommends
on
Node.jsNode.js

Nuxt + Fastify + GraphQL + Nginx + Memcache = fast, confortable and a lot of plug-ins. Apache is realy slow :(. Nuxt is great and easy to use. Nginx, Memcache and Fastify it's very efficient. GraphQL require much more from You then REST, but give You flaxibility, order, plugin etc. We tried and don't regret .

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Needs advice
on
ASP.NETASP.NETJavaScriptJavaScript
and
Node.jsNode.js

I am about to complete my graduation with a computer science background. I want to pursue my career in software development. My front-end knowledge is very poor. I didn't like PHP so I didn't go for Laravel. My university offers a course on ASP.NET, I liked C# that's why I took asp.net. But now I think .net tech is unnecessarily complicated and most of the job offers available for .net are not for freshers. Should I try js and Node.js now? I mean as a fresher which tech stack should I choose for web development(Backend)?

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Replies (2)
Anthony Chiboucas
Software Engineer & Support Operations Lead · | 5 upvotes · 91.6K views
Recommends
on
JavaScriptJavaScriptNode.jsNode.js

Just don't .NET. It was a failed idea from the start. Node and javascript are easier to learn, with much wider adoption, and more active communities.

.NET is an old experiment in using a markup language to separate the UI from the business logic. The idea was that this would allow a small team of hyper-competent engineers to build the tooling and code for a large team of less-skilled front-end developers to leverage. In practice, leveraging that customized UI markup requires understanding and adjusting the underlying code. The result is that any UI change requires a hyper-competent .NET engineer.

However, many larger companies bought into it a long time ago, and now have a hard dependency on old monolithic .NET ecosystems, and they do need .NET developers to maintain them.

So, you can get a well paying .NET job without much difficulty. However, you'll neither like it, nor be doing anything interesting. There's no growth here, only a very long slow death of .NET (that'll probably take another 20 years).

Node and Javascript are sticking around, and still growing.

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Mahmoud Gabr
Software engineer at AlgoDriven · | 4 upvotes · 91.8K views
Recommends
on
ASP.NETASP.NET

What I can see, you are confusing yourself, if you studied .Net now it's better to work as .Net developer, and you will find opportunities as fresh. Just search and don't waste your time. After you get more experience in .Net, then you can learn NodeJS if you still need to learn it.

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Needs advice
on
DjangoDjango
and
Node.jsNode.js
in

Situation: I need to make a website for my Final Year Project. It's the website for brain analysis. The website features include chat, blogs, posts, users, payment methods. One of the main features includes the use of AI, which I know only in Python.

Decisions and Confusions: I decided to make two backends and one front-end. One backend will be using Django with GraphQL/RestAPI that will be running my AI models. The other backend is for the website. It will add users, chat, post, etc. I'm thinking of using TypeScript, Prisma, ExpressJS, GraphQL, MongoDB/PostgreSQL.

Please guide me to the latest and stable tech stack I can use. Because one of the requirements of our Final Year Project is to use the latest tech stacks. 1st Backend advice? (This will be used to run AI models) 2nd Backend advice? Frontend to 2nd Backend advice?

Thank you.

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Replies (2)

Hey there 👋,

Daniel from the Prisma team here.

I think your choice of a stack would work well for your final year project.

Some recommendations: - Use PostgreSQL if you need a stable stack. Prisma support for MongoDB is currently in Preview and therefore isn't stable. Moreover, PostgreSQL being a relational database enforces a schema more strictly than MongoDB which is useful given that your data model involves multiple relations. - If your Django backend exposes a REST API, you can also expose it over the GraphQL API by proxying requests from the GraphQL API to the REST API. That way, you have a unified API for all operations. This is typically known as wrapping. - Regarding the GraphQL part, I would consider looking at Nexus and nexus-prisma.

For inspiration, check out the Prisma Examples ​repository which contains many ready-to-run examples.

Here's another fully-fledged example using Prisma, Fastify, GraphQL, and PostgreSQL: https://github.com/2color/fastify-graphql-nexus-prisma

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Recommends
on
FastAPIFastAPIKubernetesKubernetes

Hi. Maybe you can try use FastAPI instead Django https://fastapi.tiangolo.com It could be faster. The FastAPI documentation is so useful and elegant.

Also you can try split a little more the backend and use an "microservice" architecture. Using Kubernetes to deploy your services.

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Abdullah Adeel
Needs advice
on
DjangoDjangoNode.jsNode.js
and
RedisRedis

Hey everyone, I am planning to start a personal project that would be yet another social media project with real-time communication facilities like one-to-one chat, group chat, and later voice and video chat using WebRTC. The thing I am concerned about is Django being able to handle all the real-time stuff using websockets. I can use Django Channels, but I don't think that would be a very scalable solution. Moreover, django_channels require alto of configurations, and deployment is also a pain. My plan is to use a separate Node.js server to handle all the socket connections and have it talk to the main django server through Redis. My question is whether the above-mentioned solution is a good choice? If yes, how this can be achieved, keeping in mind all the authentication other related problems. It might be simple, but I have never done this before, which might be the main reason I am concerned. But any suggestion will be appreciated.

Thanks in advance 😊

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Replies (1)
Sergey St.

Try to do it with less - Nodejs + Redis + socket.io, optionally you can always communicate with django, but you can do it all in Nodejs, use pm2 and cluster too. For Redis you can also use Pub/Sub, is a good combination for future scaling.

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Needs advice
on
DjangoDjango.NET Core.NET Core
and
Node.jsNode.js

Looking for Advice! I am developing a hybrid app for video streaming, I have a prior experience with .NET Core and would like to use it for my back end but the latest buzz on characteristics of Node.js such as light weight, event loop and Async capabilities is really tempting me to reconsider my decision. On a quick research I could observe that a lot of Internet companies use either Python Django or Node JS for their back end which has thrown me into confusion, looking for an expert advice, thx.

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Replies (5)
Brandon Miller
Recommends
on
GolangGolang

If you want to create a reliable video streaming service, you'll probably want to go with a UDP approach. TCP will throw an exception as soon as a packet drops. That being said..... Node.js is ultimately a bad choice. Way too high-level. I've found, when working with UDP, it's much more performant on lower level languages like C, etc. As far as my recommendation, if you want to go with something 'new' and fun, check out GoLang. It's low level, and developed to handle high performance at scale.

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anas mattar
Technical Lead at DPO International · | 5 upvotes · 197.2K views
Recommends
on
.NET Core.NET Core

That's depend on your experience if you are very well in C# you should start using the Technology that's you know and like it.

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So none of these tools may be bad for your implementation of this streaming app. But one thing to consider is what are you trying to achieve. If your application is more front end facing with streaming to a backend service C# may be your better implementation path just due to its greater overall versatility in terms of options for mobile, backend development, front end development, service development, etc... However if your focused purely on the streaming aspects and utilizing Amazon or Azure services in conjunction with the language of choice, Python, Node.Js, Django or other technologies may offer a faster option to success. Another thing to consider is many of the streaming platforms today utilize services from cloud vendors to achieve their success more than simply the ingenuity on the part of their internal staff's programming skills. Traditional programming languages like Java, C++, C# are used less these days. Today most teams are piggybacking off these services where its possible to give your application the greatest ability to compete with the big boys. - Your Friendly Neighborhood Tech Manager

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Aslam Mohammad
Systems Engineer at Infosys · | 2 upvotes · 181.9K views
Recommends
on
DjangoDjangoNode.jsNode.js

You could apparently go for both Node or Django but I would recommend choosing Node as you're building a video streaming app and the biggest video streaming service Netflix used Node in the production.

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Pavel Nekrasov
MyOpenTour at MyOpenTour · | 1 upvotes · 159.1K views
Recommends
on
fastapifastapi
at

Take a look at FastAPI if you are going to choose Python

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Decisions about Dropwizard and Node.js
Benjamin Stirrup

NestJS has a very good documention. Furthermore, as a former django-user myself, I believe it is nice to finally get a backend node.js framework very much opiniated like Django. It may be related to what I previously said, but in terms of enterprise-used framework, it seems that Nest.js is the most popular.

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Noe Osorio

Node Js have worked incredible great for me on every project I had. It is fast enough to support big and small apps, you do not have to worry about performance, because it is very capable of building a big REST API.

One advantage is that the learning curve is lower when you have used javascript on web browser as frontend, so, it is easy to migrate from Frontend to Backend with node.

Node Package Manager (NPM) has an incredible amount of packages from many developers, so you can use them on your project as you need them.

Code is easy to support, way different than Java Legacy code.

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We choose Next.js for our React framework because it's very minimal and has a very organized file structure. Also, it offers key features like zero setups, automatic server rendering and code splitting, typescript support. Our app requires some loading time to process the video, server-side rendering will allow our website to display faster than client-side rending.

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Hampton Catlin
VP of Engineering at Rent The Runway · | 7 upvotes · 432.6K views

Starting a new company in 2020, with a whole new stack, is a really interesting opportunity for me to look back over the last 20 years of my career with web software and make the right decision for my company.

And, I went with the most radical decision– which is to ignore "sexy" / "hype" technologies almost entirely, and go back to a stack that I first used over 15 years ago.

For my purposes, we are building a video streaming platform, where I wanted rapid customer-facing feature development, high testability, simple scaling, and ease of hiring great, experienced talent. To be clear, our web platform is NOT responsible for handling the actual bits and bytes of the video itself, that's an entirely different stack. It simply needs to manage the business rules and the customers experience of the video content.

I reviewed a lot of different technologies, but none of them seemed to fit the bill as well as Rails did! The hype train had long left the station with Rails, and the community is a little more sparse than it was previously. And, to be honest, Ruby was the language that was easiest for developers, but I find that most languages out there have adopted many of it's innovations for ease of use – or at least corrected their own.

Even with all of that, Rails still seems like the best framework for developing web applications that are no more complex than they need to be. And that's key to me, because it's very easy to go use React and Redux and GraphQL and a whole host of AWS Lamba's to power my blog... but you simply don't actually NEED that.

There are two choices I made in our stack that were new for me personally, and very different than what I would have chosen even 5 years ago.

1) Postgres - I decided to switch from MySql to Postgres for this project. I wanted to use UUID's instead of numeric primary keys, and knew I'd have a couple places where better JSON/object support would be key. Mysql remains far more popular, but almost every developer I respect has switched and preferred Postgres with a strong passion. It's not "sexy" but it's considered "better".

2) Stimulus.js - This was definitely the biggest and wildest choice to make. Stimulus is a Javascript framework by my old friend Sam Stephenson (Prototype.js, rbenv, turbolinks) and DHH, and it is a sort of radical declaration that your Javascript in the browser can be both powerful and modern AND simple. It leans heavily on the belief that HTML-is-good and that data-* attributes are good. It focuses on the actions and interactions and not on the rendering aspects. It took me a while to wrap my head around, and I still have to remind myself, that server-side-HTML is how you solve many problems with this stack, and avoid trying to re-render things just in the browser. So far, I'm happy with this choice, but it is definitely a radical departure from the current trends.

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Omran Jamal
CTO & Co-founder at Bonton Connect · | 7 upvotes · 569.5K views

We actually initially wrote a lot of networking code in Kotlin but the complexities involved prompted us to try and compile NodeJS for Android and port over all the networking logic to Node and communicate with node over the Java Native Interface.

This turned out to be a great decision considering our battery usage fell by 40% and rate of development increased by a factor of 2.

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As a small team, we wanted to pick the framework which allowed us to move quickly. There's no option better than Rails. Not having to solve the fundamentals means we can more quickly build our feature set. No other framework can beat ActiveRecord in terms of integration & ease-of use. To top it all of, there's a lot of attention paid to security in the framework, making almost everything safe-by-default.

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Hey guys,

My backend set up is Prisma / GraphQL-Yoga at the moment, and I love it. It's so intuitive to learn and is really neat on the frontend too, however, there were a few gotchas when I was learning! Especially around understanding how it all pieces together (the stack). There isn't a great deal of information out there on exactly how to put into production my set up, which is a backend set up on a Digital Ocean droplet with Prisma/GraphQL Yoga in a Docker Container using Next & Apollo Client on the frontend somewhere else. It's such a niche subject, so I bet only a few hundred people have got a website with this stack in production. Anyway, I wrote a blog post to help those who might need help understanding it. Here it is, hope it helps!

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This basically came down to two things: performance on compute-heavy tasks and a need for good tooling. We used to have a Meteor based Node.js application which worked great for RAD and getting a working prototype in a short time, but we felt pains trying to scale it, especially when doing anything involving crunching data, which Node sucks at. We also had bad experience with tooling support for doing large scale refactorings in Javascript compared to the best-in-class tools available for Java (IntelliJ). Given the heavy domain and very involved logic we wanted good tooling support to be able to do great refactorings that are just not possible in Javascript. Java is an old warhorse, but it performs fantastically and we have not regretted going down this route, avoiding "enterprise" smells and going as lightweight as we can, using Jdbi instead of Persistence API, a homegrown Actor Model library for massive concurrency, etc ...

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I was researching multiple high performance, concurent//parallel languages for the needs of authentication and authorization server, to be built on microservice architecture and Linux OS. Node.js with its asynchronous behavior and event loop suits the case best. Python Django & Flash turns to be slower and .NET Core & Framework wasn't the best choice for the Linux environment at the time (summer 2018).

I also tested Go lang and Rust, although they didn't meet the quick prototyping criteria as both languages are young and lacking libraries or battle-tested ORM.

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Radoslaw Fabisiak

We builded Duomly with: BE: Node.JS & Nest.JS & TypeScript & PostgreSQL and FE: React & Sass & Javascript.

The whole of the stack is JS related what helps us to keep development on a track. When building backend we decided to go go for TS & Nest.js because we had experience with Javascript and still wanted to have control over types.

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Pros of Dropwizard
Pros of Node.js
  • 27
    Quick and easy to get a new http service going
  • 23
    Health monitoring
  • 20
    Metrics integration
  • 20
    Easy setup
  • 18
    Good conventions
  • 14
    Good documentation
  • 14
    Lightweight
  • 13
    Java Powered
  • 10
    Good Testing frameworks
  • 7
    Java powered, lightweight
  • 5
    Simple
  • 4
    Scalable
  • 3
    Great performance, Good in prod
  • 2
    Open source
  • 2
    All in one-productive-production ready-makes life easy
  • 1.4K
    Npm
  • 1.3K
    Javascript
  • 1.1K
    Great libraries
  • 1K
    High-performance
  • 805
    Open source
  • 486
    Great for apis
  • 477
    Asynchronous
  • 423
    Great community
  • 390
    Great for realtime apps
  • 296
    Great for command line utilities
  • 84
    Websockets
  • 83
    Node Modules
  • 69
    Uber Simple
  • 59
    Great modularity
  • 58
    Allows us to reuse code in the frontend
  • 42
    Easy to start
  • 35
    Great for Data Streaming
  • 32
    Realtime
  • 28
    Awesome
  • 25
    Non blocking IO
  • 18
    Can be used as a proxy
  • 17
    High performance, open source, scalable
  • 16
    Non-blocking and modular
  • 15
    Easy and Fun
  • 14
    Easy and powerful
  • 13
    Future of BackEnd
  • 13
    Same lang as AngularJS
  • 12
    Fullstack
  • 11
    Fast
  • 10
    Scalability
  • 10
    Cross platform
  • 9
    Simple
  • 8
    Mean Stack
  • 7
    Great for webapps
  • 7
    Easy concurrency
  • 6
    Typescript
  • 6
    Fast, simple code and async
  • 6
    React
  • 6
    Friendly
  • 5
    Control everything
  • 5
    Its amazingly fast and scalable
  • 5
    Easy to use and fast and goes well with JSONdb's
  • 5
    Scalable
  • 5
    Great speed
  • 5
    Fast development
  • 4
    It's fast
  • 4
    Easy to use
  • 4
    Isomorphic coolness
  • 3
    Great community
  • 3
    Not Python
  • 3
    Sooper easy for the Backend connectivity
  • 3
    TypeScript Support
  • 3
    Blazing fast
  • 3
    Performant and fast prototyping
  • 3
    Easy to learn
  • 3
    Easy
  • 3
    Scales, fast, simple, great community, npm, express
  • 3
    One language, end-to-end
  • 3
    Less boilerplate code
  • 2
    Npm i ape-updating
  • 2
    Event Driven
  • 2
    Lovely
  • 1
    Creat for apis
  • 0
    Node

Sign up to add or upvote prosMake informed product decisions

Cons of Dropwizard
Cons of Node.js
  • 2
    Slightly more confusing dependencies
  • 1
    Not on ThoughtWorks radar since 2014
  • 46
    Bound to a single CPU
  • 45
    New framework every day
  • 40
    Lots of terrible examples on the internet
  • 33
    Asynchronous programming is the worst
  • 24
    Callback
  • 19
    Javascript
  • 11
    Dependency hell
  • 11
    Dependency based on GitHub
  • 10
    Low computational power
  • 7
    Very very Slow
  • 7
    Can block whole server easily
  • 7
    Callback functions may not fire on expected sequence
  • 4
    Breaking updates
  • 4
    Unstable
  • 3
    Unneeded over complication
  • 3
    No standard approach
  • 1
    Bad transitive dependency management
  • 1
    Can't read server session

Sign up to add or upvote consMake informed product decisions

What is Dropwizard?

Dropwizard is a sneaky way of making fast Java web applications. Dropwizard pulls together stable, mature libraries from the Java ecosystem into a simple, light-weight package that lets you focus on getting things done.

What is Node.js?

Node.js uses an event-driven, non-blocking I/O model that makes it lightweight and efficient, perfect for data-intensive real-time applications that run across distributed devices.

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What companies use Node.js?
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Blog Posts

Oct 24 2019 at 7:43PM

AppSignal

JavaScriptNode.jsJava+8
5
962
Oct 3 2019 at 7:13PM

Ably Realtime

JavaScriptPythonNode.js+8
5
3837
Node.jsnpmKubernetes+6
1
1439
GitNode.jsFirebase+5
7
2370
JavaScriptGitHubNode.js+29
14
13474
What are some alternatives to Dropwizard and Node.js?
Spring Boot
Spring Boot makes it easy to create stand-alone, production-grade Spring based Applications that you can "just run". We take an opinionated view of the Spring platform and third-party libraries so you can get started with minimum fuss. Most Spring Boot applications need very little Spring configuration.
Play
Play Framework makes it easy to build web applications with Java & Scala. Play is based on a lightweight, stateless, web-friendly architecture. Built on Akka, Play provides predictable and minimal resource consumption (CPU, memory, threads) for highly-scalable applications.
Spring
A key element of Spring is infrastructural support at the application level: Spring focuses on the "plumbing" of enterprise applications so that teams can focus on application-level business logic, without unnecessary ties to specific deployment environments.
Dropwizard Metrics
It is a Java library which gives you insight into what your code does in production. It provides a powerful toolkit of ways to measure the behavior of critical components in your production environment. It provides you with full-stack visibility.
Jersey
It is open source, production quality, framework for developing RESTful Web Services in Java that provides support for JAX-RS APIs and serves as a JAX-RS (JSR 311 & JSR 339) Reference Implementation. It provides it’s own API that extend the JAX-RS toolkit with additional features and utilities to further simplify RESTful service and client development.
See all alternatives