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Laravel vs Symfony: What are the differences?

What is Laravel? A PHP Framework For Web Artisans. Laravel is a web application framework with expressive, elegant syntax. We believe development must be an enjoyable, creative experience to be truly fulfilling. Laravel attempts to take the pain out of development by easing common tasks used in the majority of web projects, such as authentication, routing, sessions, and caching.

What is Symfony? A PHP full-stack web framework. Symfony is written with speed and flexibility in mind. It allows developers to build better and easy to maintain websites with PHP. Symfony can be used to develop all kind of websites, from your personal blog to high traffic ones like Dailymotion or Yahoo! Answers.

Laravel and Symfony belong to "Frameworks (Full Stack)" category of the tech stack.

"Clean architecture", "Growing community" and "Composer friendly" are the key factors why developers consider Laravel; whereas "Open source", "Php" and "Community" are the primary reasons why Symfony is favored.

Laravel and Symfony are both open source tools. Laravel with 53.4K GitHub stars and 16.4K forks on GitHub appears to be more popular than Symfony with 21.1K GitHub stars and 7.01K GitHub forks.

According to the StackShare community, Laravel has a broader approval, being mentioned in 831 company stacks & 773 developers stacks; compared to Symfony, which is listed in 374 company stacks and 277 developer stacks.

Advice on Laravel and Symfony
Needs advice
on
Laravel
and
CodeIgniter

I need to build a web application plus android and IOS apps for an enterprise, like an e-commerce portal. It will have intensive use of MySQL to display thousands (40-50k) of live product information in an interactive table (searchable, filterable), live delivery tracking. It has to be secure, as it will handle information on customers, sales, inventory. Here is the technology stack: Backend: Laravel 7 Frondend: Vue.js, React or AngularJS?

Need help deciding technology stack. Thanks.

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Replies (6)
anas mattar
Technical Lead at DPO International · | 12 upvotes · 28.3K views
Recommends
Vue.js
Laravel

It's better to use Laravel with Vue.js and also laravel is very lightweight and speed performance.

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Brandon Miller
Recommends
Node.js
Go

I don't know anything really about CodeIgniter, but I do know that microservices are a great choice for e-commerce, as they tend to have a lot of different moving (but not necessarily connected) parts. That being said, and if you have a choice, I'd recommend Go personally. But node isn't the worst option if Go isn't something you're comfortable with.

If you know typescript and want an entire framework to work with, go wth Angular. AngularJS, to my knowledge was deprecated. React is great, popular, and you'll find a ton of support.

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Jagdeep Singh
Tech Lead at Founder + Lightning · | 4 upvotes · 19.6K views
Recommends
Laravel

Go for Laravel 8 (not 7, obviously because it's the latest version and has a lot of new features and bug fixes) when it comes to backend coding.

Go for Vue.js (if you don't have any preference) because it is having by default configuration setup in Laravel).

Pick MySQL or PostgreSQL both work fine.

If you know GCP, go for it, otherwise go for Heroku.

Avoid spending time on hosting setup - prefer PaaS based solutions.

In Laravel, try Laravel Breeze or Jetstream - these might make the development much faster - at least for the basic setup that is there.

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Vlad Macovei
Full stack developer at EasyDo Digital Technologies · | 3 upvotes · 7.2K views
Recommends
Nuxt.js
Laravel

I highly recomand using the Vue based Nuxt framework for the front end. It is not required to use the server render feature and the folder based routing and stores are really nice to work with. In addition it brings component auto import and lots of plugins neatly integrated (authentication, i18n, socket.io, etc.). If in the setup process you also chose Vuetify as a component library you will cover 98% of needed components.

As for Laravel vs CodeIginter I would chose Laravel as the safest bet. Sadly, CodeIgniter development slowed down after the main contributor's death. It is also worth mentioning, as others did, that the initial boost Vue got is from Laravel's creator and community. The simplicity and ease of use mindset is shared.

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40-50k should not be a problem at all for the database nor for any frontend/backend combo. Laravel works pretty well with Vue.js, for example; and you can include Elasticsearch in the combo if you really need fulltext search capabilites in your app. That will be much more decisive in the final product than the frontend stack chosen.

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Nic Rosental
Recommends
Vue.js

I can't speak to Angular since I haven't used it for at least 3 years (I wasn't a fan back then) but both React and Vue are great frameworks and will do the job just fine. Since you are using Laravel for the back end I'd recommend Vue. There's a lot of overlap between the communities and most Laravel developers I know do favor Vue over React.

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Needs advice
on
Spring Boot
and
Laravel

Hi. I am a backend developer in a company tasked with recoding a legacy application, choosing the right technology stack, and then later hiring for that stack.

This is a freight/logistics application made 15 years ago in PHP with no modern framework used. In this application, customers from different countries login into theirs accounts and add a huge number of shipments, like let's say 500, and then, later on, generate PDFs for them after calling third-party APIs. This application has API integrations with lots of other companies and also offers API access to its own software as well. This application is also used in-house by warehouse people to scan different shipments using barcode scanners and to process shipments by performing different actions on them. The database being used currently is MySQL.

Now we have the choice to write this application in a modern technology stack. Performance, speed, reliability, and security are the primary concerns here.

Should I go with Java/Spring Boot with AngularJS as the front end or PHP/Laravel with Vue.js as the front end?

Switching at this point from PHP to Java will not be hard if Java is considered better here because we can hire as per our final decision.

Thanks.

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Replies (8)
Recommends
Laravel

Hi Chris, I will suggest going with Laravel and MySQL since the existing system is already in PHP it will help a lot and easier to port out to Laravel and will save a lot of time. Laravel has a very robust mechanism to handle the jobs/Queues and it comes with a lot of features.

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fabrice ilboudo

Hi Chris, I recommend you to use Java with spring boot to rewrite your software. You will have the advantages of modern applications. The main challenge will be to cut your existing business logic to functional services (microservices) that will communicate each others. That will comes up also with the challenges of orchestrate those services but for that no worries. For the database also, will recommend Postgre too. For the front end, you can use angular, react or vue js with your backend since it will be API calls.

Hope it can help!

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Springboot (you can see for "jhipster" for a quick start with spring/angularJs ) is used in many micro service enterprise applications (they are design for), so API integration is "as easy as ABC". With this you can scale and give an answer to some of your questions: performance, speed, reliability and security. But be carefull with the learning curve...

NB: - For the DB, leave mysql and go to Postgres! their is no other option! you say thank you later! (a nosql database can be a nice tool too) - You have associated a front framework with a back framework, but they is no good reason to do that. You can use vuejs with springboot too (and i use them!)

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Attila Fulop
Management Advisor at artkonekt · | 4 upvotes · 6.6K views
Recommends
Laravel

First of all, Java can give you definitely better speed, especially at scale. One benefit is that you can tune it for a better response time, and another one is when you'll have millions of requests per day it'll save you some infrastructure cost.

But.. will you have millions of requests a day? How much does it matter if the API response time is 10ms or 50ms?

Rewriting an existing project is a huge deal. It can take years(!), especially if the team hasn't done such a thing yet and especially if the tech stack gets completely replaced.

So I argue against rewrite in the first place. There are two older articles on the topic, but their arguments are both valid as of today: https://www.joelonsoftware.com/2000/04/06/things-you-should-never-do-part-i/ https://www.jjinux.com/2008/05/joel-on-software-never-rewrite-from.html

What I'd suggest instead is to learn refactoring strategies. Even if you have some routine with refactoring it is worth reading Fowler's refactoring book: https://book-programming.com/refactoring-books/

What I would do with a "frameworkless" PHP codebase is: - Add a framework (I would also go with Laravel, but Symfony or Phalcon would also do the job) - Isolate the existing codebase in a folder if possible without any actual changes - Route the requests through the framework (with a catch-all route) and forward the request to the existing codebase - Take a simple component/page to start with and replace the DB calls using Laravel's DB layer - Doing this "experiment", you'll have a strategy that you can apply to other components - Do the refactoring for views, controllers, etc, step by step - In case you have APIs and other kinds of components apply different strategies - Keep deploying as frequent as possible - Apply the learnings on the run and do pivots if needed

There are many more details to this, but it exceeds the scope of this answer.

About Java: last year I was part of, actually sparking the rewrite of an existing API from Symfony to Java using Spring Boot/JHipster. The bottom line is that it was a bad idea.

We had a separate PM, an Engineering Manager, and a set of developers both Java and PHP, one of the developers highly experienced with the JHipster stack. We've got the support of the CEO, and despite his strong worries, the Head of Software gave it a green light too. After 20 months the old PHP system is still running and - of course - it has more features than the Java one, because life didn't stop, business demanded new features in the live system.

Java and the whole ecosystem are very different, so even if you have people with battlefield experience with it, the complete rewrite is extremely risky.

In my opinion, it's less of a technical than a business decision. I would sit down with the person(s) paying the bill for the refactoring. I would phrase the following questions and elaborate the answer together with them: - What is the problem we want to solve? (maintainability? speed? lack of people understanding the system? security?) - Is the system legacy only technically or also in the meaning "it no longer fits the business' reality"? - What are the expected outcomes of the refactoring? - What is the budget for the new/refactored system? - What is the timeframe allowed for the refactoring/rewrite? - How does the rewrite compare to refactoring, in terms of time, money, and complexity? - What happens with the development of new features during refactoring? - What resources will be assigned to the refactoring project?

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Being worked on both frameworks, I would suggest Spring Boot as it is really great when it comes to scalability. Laravel on the other hand provides great developer tools and a command line interface for the ease of development ( I really love the migrations in Laravel). If it is performance and scalability you are looking for then Spring Boot is your go to. It (and Java) has really matured over the years. Also, I would suggest you to consider Angular 2+ since AngularJs is obsolete.

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Brandon Miller
Recommends

Depends on how much time and money the company is willing to invest... But I'd recommend at least getting a start on lifting and shifting to the cloud if you have the knowledge/ability. Lots of performance gains can be made as well as cost saving. Not to mention learning how to operate on the cloud is a great thing to put on any resume these days.

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Yoram Kornatzky
Independent Information Technology and Services Professional at DR. YORAM KORNATZKY LTD · | 2 upvotes · 6.6K views
Recommends
Laravel

Much easier to work with. And naturally integrates with Vue.js. Angular is in decline. Moreover, you already live in the PHP ecosystem. While I do both Java and PHP, onboarding into the PHP ecosystem is much faster.

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Recommends

Any help? 234 views but not a single advice 🙁

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Needs advice
on
Rails
Laravel
and
Django

Which is better of Laravel, Rails and Django for creating great products quickly?

Which is better for creating open source apps that others might want to contribute to?

I want a mature tool for creating web apps that qualifies for:

  • Quick prototyping
  • Easy to get to production level for backend
  • Maintainable and buildable by one person alone
  • Enforces conformity, so others can easily read and contribute to the code, making successfully open sourcing possible
  • Works well with React
  • Has a mature and fairly stable ecosystem for the basics (auth, storage, db, image handling, backups, change history, etc.
  • Has an ecosystem that will still be alive in 10 years, responding to changes.

I would have to learn Ruby, Python or PHP for each, so that factors in too.

I'm proficient in React and Node.js, but I feel the node backend ecosystem is too immature with a million different ways to do everything, and too many decisions to make, too much wiring to get everything to work together, and too many packages that end up not being supported a few months down the line.

Which would you choose for me to learn?

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Replies (4)
malekmfs
at Meam Software Engineering Group · | 6 upvotes · 35.1K views
Recommends
Rails
Django

Comparing them end-to-end, Rails comes the most productive in my opinion. But there are bolder parameters you may consider. i.e. no one switches from Django to Rails to improve productivity and vice versa (probably from Laravel to one of those two).

  • The language's productivity also matters, which both Ruby and Python are better for that.

  • There is a philosophical difference between #Django and #Rails :

  • Django supports the "Explicit over Implicit" idea, making it easier for newcomers to understand what's going on. This idea also has downsides. This allows beginners to start working with Django without even learning Django and best practices and defer learning by using references like Stackoverflow.com, which is not a good idea because you potentially don't know things that you don't know! Also, you may find many different project styles.

  • On the other hand, Rails support the "Convention over configuration" and Scaffolding idea. It's easier for a Rails developer to be added to a new project or just review a random Rails project. Everything has a default and also it has some downsides as well. e.g. As a beginner, everything feels like magic in Rails, and you don't understand what is going on and how Rails understand while you didn't "explicitly" say what do you want sometimes.

Conclusion: Rails and Django are more productive and you can build projects on your own quickly (many giant startups launched this way!).

Node.JS isn't immature, also sometimes shows better performance comparing the mentioned alternatives. But if you suffer from "a million different ways to do everything" and "many decisions to make", Take Ruby on Rails for sure.

P.S: for learning RoR I suggest the book/video from Michael Hartl.

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Recommends
Django

I picked Django because we use it at work. But honestly, if you don't know any of them, I would look at the jobs around where you live and learn the one that either has the most jobs posted or if you can look at the trends the one that is growing the number of jobs the most.

All three would satisfy your needs and all three are good choices. Dotnet core would also be a good choice, again if there are jobs in your area for said technologies. If you literally don't care about this for employment, learn them all and just do it in alphabetical order :)

Note: I think you are wrong about Node being too immature - there are also MOSTLY standards for everything you want to do on the backend that have not changed for many years.

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Malo Skrylev

I recommend Ruby/Rails. I write the text in question answer form:

Quick prototyping

Yes you can use the prototyping in Rails or not. And this can be realized by adding any of testing framework like Cucumber or RSpec for example. Writing the test you can work on the application prototype without a change real code in production, or even development environment.

Easy to get to production level for backend

Yes it is easy, you are able to use the capistrano gem with its modules, if required, to deploy application to production within a day.

Maintainable and buildable by one person alone

Since the Rails gets on itself the main code part of a data processing, you are able easily to generate the required code with build-in Rails or external gem generators, and to merely maintain the your code, if you would cover it with a test of selected test framework.

Enforces conformity, so others can easily read and contribute to the code, making successfully open sourcing possible

As far as I said you can barely control a contribution to your project with using the test covering frameworks, to keep conformity the project.

Works well with React

You can use React along with any JS NPM module easily using webpacker gem.

Has a mature and fairly stable ecosystem for the basics (auth, storage, db, image handling, backups, change history, etc.

Of course the Rails framework is supported by many three-side gems, which can be found at rubygems, that support the authentication (devise), storage feature (fog), db (pg/mysql/sqlite3), image handling (rmagick), backups (backup), change history (history)

Has an ecosystem that will still be alive in 10 years, responding to changes.

Ruby/Rails with the RubyGem ecosystem is actively envolving and not plan to be collapsed and abandned with of development both Ruby language and Rails framework.

So, you can freely and fearlessly start using the Rails framework as server side base for your project.

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Andrew Kornilov
Co-founder, Principal Developer · | 3 upvotes · 15.6K views
Recommends

Rails uses too much magic and sugar. Laravel is something from the previous century. I'd say Django can be well balanced choice. I have extensive experience with all three. So, this advice based on practical projects

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Needs advice
on
Laravel
Ignite UI
and
CakePHP

Hi, Which tool will you recommend:

I need to build a web application, oriented to small businesses, like a small ERP. It will have intensive use of Sql to access a PostgreSQL database. It has to be secure, as it will handle information on customers, sales, inventory.

If you think another tool will be better, please let that know.

Thanks a lot

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Replies (2)
Krunal Shah
Full Stack Developer at Infynno Solutions · | 5 upvotes · 21.4K views

Laravel and Postgres will be the better solutions you can add more like Redis for caching and React/Vue for the frontend.

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Recommends
Spring Boot

Check Spring, if security and reliability is needed along with Lots of Database , check Spring Data, spring web, spring security

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Needs advice
on
Node.js
and
Laravel

What will be better Laravel or Node.js to handle a logistics portal which displays thousands (20-50k) of delivery data information in an interactive table (searchable, filterable), live delivery tracking, basic user management, and report creation?

Data comes usually in CSV (manually uploaded or via API from courier companies). Live tracking uses checks tracking numbers on the courier page using API.

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Replies (1)
Francis Rodrigues
FullStack JavaScript Developer at PanelADM · | 5 upvotes · 71.5K views
Recommends
Node.js
Laravel

My question for you is: "Which one are you familiar with?" Following your needs, both could do it, but think about it. Now talking about Node.js, in my opinion, if you use JavaScript, there are lots of packages to support your entire project, including native ones for testing TDD and others for BDD. Also the best support on AWS (Amazon Web Services) and GCP (Google Cloud Platform).

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Needs advice
on
Node.js
Laravel
and
Django

I am looking to make a website builder web app, where users can publish built websites with a custom or subdomain (much like Wix, Weebly, Squarespace, etc.), and I was wondering about any advice on which web framework to build it on? I currently know Node.js, but I would be excited to learn Laravel or Django if those would be better options. Any advice would be much appreciated!

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Replies (3)

The tools you mentioned are all backend focused frameworks. I will say, you can choose one of them as you may prefer (maybe Laravel and Django will be better since it's more organized than Node.js). But no matter what, if you will create a website builder application, today you'll need a frontend framework like Vue.js, React or Angular - or maybe Ember.js, Svelte and Meteor.

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Đam Lê Đình
Senior Software Engineer at NAB · | 6 upvotes · 115.8K views
Recommends
Laravel

If you use Nodejs, you should use one more frontend language like reactjs or angularjs. Laravel is the better option. They are more power for rendering.

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Needs advice
on
Node.js
Laravel
and
ASP.NET

Hi. We are planning to develop web, desktop, and mobile app for procurement, logistics, and contracts. Procure to Pay and Source to pay, spend management, supplier management, catalog management. ( similar to SAP Ariba, gap.com, coupa.com, ivalua.com vroozi.com, procurify.com

We got stuck when deciding which technology stack is good for the future. We look forward to your kind guidance that will help us.

We want to integrate with multiple databases with seamless bidirectional integration. What APIs and middleware available are best to achieve this? SAP HANA, Oracle, MySQL, MongoDB...

ASP.NET / Node.js / Laravel. ......?

Please guide us

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Replies (1)
Recommends
ASP.NET

i recommended .NET because the library so rich, you can integrated any sources to computed , compiling, integrating, your apps to high complexity, easy to communicated with SAP BAPI. used Oracle DB, Cheers.

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Needs advice
on
Node.js
and
Laravel

I would like to share my stack in Web/Mobile application Development for Mid Sized Applications.

Project-1 : Laravel + jQuery + Android Java + IOS Swift

Project-2 : Node.js + React + React Native + Electron.

This is my current Stack, Can you comment on my selection and add your thoughts if my choice is a perfect match? Thanks

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Replies (2)
John Clifford de Vera
Software Engineer at CircleYY · | 5 upvotes · 111K views
Recommends
Node.js

I would say go for Node.js since you probably would only build a REST API that would talk to the frontend and some communication with the database.

On the other hand, Laravel is a much heavier framework that follows MVC pattern. Since you don't need the V in the MVC of Laravel. You can go for a straight Express that just handles the API request and return a response.

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Nathan De Pachtere
Fullstack Developer at Alpsify · | 3 upvotes · 115.7K views
Recommends
Flutter
at

Hello Varun S,

Project-1 : If the Laravel part is an API, you should check Flutter or Quasar Framework for your frontend in order to reduce the development time and process.

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Eva Maciejko
Needs advice
on
Spring Boot
Laravel
and
ExpressJS

Hello, I am a fullstack web developer. I have been working for a company with Java/ Spring Boot and client-side JavaScript(mainly jQuery, some AngularJS) for the past 4 years. As I wish to now work as a freelancer, I am faced with a dilemma: which stack to choose given my current knowledge and the state of the market?

I've heard PHP is very popular in the freelance world. I don't know PHP. However, I'm sure it wouldn't be difficult to learn since it has many similarities with Java (OOP). It seems to me that Laravel has similarities with Spring Boot (it's MVC and OOP). Also, people say Laravel works well with Vue.js, which is my favorite JS framework.

On the other hand, I already know the Javascript language, and I like Vue.js, so I figure I could go the fullstack Javascript route with ExpressJS. However, I am not sure if these techs are ripe for freelancing (with regards to RAD, stability, reliability, security, costs, etc.) Is it true that Express is almost always used with MongoDB? Because my experience is mostly with SQL databases.

The projects I would like to work on are custom web applications/websites for small businesses. I have developed custom ERPs before and found that Java was a good fit, except for it taking a long time to develop. I cannot make a choice, and I am constantly switching between trying PHP and Node.js/Express. Any real-world advice would be welcome! I would love to find a stack that I enjoy while doing meaningful freelance coding.

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Replies (10)
Recommends
Spring Boot

Hi Eva, As you have solid experience with Spring already, you should jump into freelancing with that. It would be quite stressful to start freelancing with a tech stack you don't know well. Then in the background you can keep learning/practicing an alternative and switch over when you are confident enough (eg. 0.5-1 year later). I think you should learn Laravel as you already like it and find it easier. Express has better performance but that is not required for most of the small freelancer projects.

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Recommends
ExpressJS

Looking at current technological trends and rise of JavaScript, you cannot go wrong with JavaScript. - There's an abundance of libraries to get most things done - You can use JavaScript for both the frontend and the backend - this allows you potentially share your logic/models/code across both stacks - A dynamic/interpreted language such as JavaScript is great for serverless (there's somewhat of a trend towards serverless aswell - especially in modern projects) - If you like/need static typing, you can always migrate seemlessly to Typescript - VueJS is a lightweight framework (compared to Angular), it has more GitHub stars and most would argue it's easier to work with (beginner friendly). Additionally most modern webapps do not use JQuery anymore (even though a lot of legacy projects continue to do so). You don't need JQuery if you use Vue/Angular/React

Additionally it doesn't seem like performance is a hugely important metric in your scenario, so JavaScript would suffice.

Note: These are all my opinions and what I've seen in the current market when recently searching for jobs.

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Benoît Hubert
JavaScript Instructor at Wild Code School · | 6 upvotes · 246.7K views
Recommends
Spring Boot

I think Patrik and Alex are right: if you're comfortable with Spring Boot already, you'll be more productive right from the start.

If you wish to learn something else besides, both Laravel and Express are good choices. They aren't in the same category of frameworks: Laravel is an all-in-one solution, while Express is more like "build your own stack from different parts". Which implies that you can use whatever you want as a database engine: MySQL or PostgreSQL are perfectly valid choices (in my school, we teach Express with MySQL, because SQL is still a big thing here in France, and a sought-after skill). You can use Sequelize or TypeORM which support all major SQL DBMS.

Express is widely used, but if you're seeking the JavaScript equivalent of Spring Boot or Laravel, you probably want to look at NestJS. The only potential downside is that it's still young, maintained by a small commmunity, compared to those behind Spring Boot and Laravel.

Bottom line: using a stack tech, that you enjoy and are comfortable with, matters. Spring Boot + Vue.js seem perfectly fine to me. But do forget jQuery if you're using Vue.js, React or Angular, because it will definitely bring more harm than good!

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Recommends
Spring Boot

I would definitely recommend you to go with Spring Boot + AngularJS + jQuery. Reasons: 1- You have an experience of 4 years with the above-mentioned stack. 2- As you mentioned that you wish to work as a freelancer, your stack is the perfect one for finding good bids with a little less effort than that of PHP + Laravel + Vue.js.

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Hi as someone who employs and select developers i agree with a lot almost sayed but think of what are your strengths and where you are or better where your customers are. If you search for big enterprise projects spring boot is ok sql is must and html css as well. if you want to go more to internet related companies (like airbnb, what sup, facebook ) or similar (and not asia) then react is a must node js as well. The libraries tools etc which are used you need to adopt fast. If asia then VUE is a must. but if you like small projects with individuals or like wordpress or similar then you can learn php but i think in 2020 it is wasted time. Same for python in that area. and i also see that we often have problem that developer at least must understand docker docker compose better as it works with kubernetes ,.. just my 5 cents

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Alex Spieslechner
Recommends
Spring Boot

in order to stay employable, I'd work with something you can deliver with. if I'd be your client and you'd have to get comfortable with a new stack, I would 100% not pay you for this startup time. learn new stuff in your free-time. or set aside time for learning.

that said, if you want to reorientate, php (even though i personally hate it) is extremely wide spread. but so are java and nodejs. so I'm not a fan of that argument... i recommend building something in each language, and see what you enjoy more. for me it was nodejs, because I already enjoy frontend JavaScript, and appreciate the ecosystem and community.

regarding expressjs and mongodb: yes, it is a goto solution for a lot of tutorials, because its as simple as it gets. especially wben using something like monk. BUT if you want to use mysql, posgres or similar, check out TypeORM, Prism or another ORM-like solution. you can use any db with express, and there's plenty of abstraction layers, which make your life easier. but i noticed that expressjs does a lot less "holding hands" compared to .net core (c#), or laravel (php). can be a pro or a con.

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Rubin Thomas
Software Cloud Developer at RUBIN THOMAS · | 4 upvotes · 186.7K views
Recommends
Python
PHP
Perl

As a developer myself, I would recommend you not to restrict yourself to JAVA, PHP or any other language. New Tools/languages keep coming every day. If you do plan to move to freelancing. PHP has a lot of options in the freelance space and a lot of competition too.

Learning PHP is as simple as learning any other language. It depends merely on your interest.

Personally if you can code, you should not restrict yourself. I have had to code in many languages, PHP, Perl, shell script, Python, Java, Javascript, Ruby etc... I would keep your developing skills and logic, algorithms etc.. and increase your knowledge and experience in the different languages.

I agree with you JAVA is a lot more time consuming. But it also has its enterprise level scope.

At the same time learning a new language should not be a barrier for you to stop exploring what's out there and keeping your skills up to date. Learning new technologies should be your primary focus and getting project out of your stack helps you build a good reputation.

There are many options for you to pursue. Having an open mindset will help you move forward. If you look to learn now, you are setting yourself up for a brighter future.

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I like fullstack freelancers who stacks are clean as one of below

  1. PHP (laravel ) + Jquery + Bootstrap

  2. Python(Django) + Angular JS or VueJS

  3. NODEJS + REACTJS

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Ahmed Gamal

Please, try to work with your comfortable stack, here is some recommendation

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Recommends
ExpressJS

Hey There, I would recommend going fullstack javascript since you already have experience with javascript on the front end it would be very easy to pickup node and express js. You can use sql with node and express if you please, but mongo is pretty easy to get going with.

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Needs advice
on
Symfony
Node.js
and
Go

I'm about to begin working on an API, for which I plan to add GraphQL connectivity for processing data. The data processed will mainly be audio files being downloaded/uploaded with some user messaging & authentication.

I don't mind the difficulty in any service since I've used C++ (for data structures & algorithms at least) and would also say I am patient and can learn fairly quickly. My main concerns would be their performance, libraries/community, and job marketability.

Why I'm stuck between these three...

Symfony: I've programmed in PHP for back-end in a previous internship and may do so again in a few months.

Node.js: It's newer than PHP, and it's JavaScript where my front-end stack will be React and (likely) React Native.

Go: It's newer than PHP, I've heard of its good performance, and it would be nice to learn a new (growing) language.

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Replies (1)
Max Musing
Founder & CEO at BaseDash · | 6 upvotes · 48.4K views
Recommends
Node.js
at

Go with Node.js. There's something really satisfying about being able to use a single language across your entire tech stack. Especially once you integrate GraphQL, which is effectively JSON.

Your second best option is Go, but the ecosystem around Node.js is quite a bit stronger. This will play a big factor when you start building functionality like file management, messaging (especially in real-time), and authentication. The libraries and documentation are just stronger for Node.

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Decisions about Laravel and Symfony

I am planning to develop project management system SAAS based. Can any one help me with selection of platforms from Django or Laravel and for database MongoDB or Firebase/Firestore or MySql? On front end I am going to use Quasar Framework (VueJS). Note : project will be Webapp, Mobile app and desktop app.

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washie mugo
Chose
Django
over
Laravel

i find python quite resourceful. given the bulk of libraries that python has and the trends of the tech i find django which runs on python to be the framework of choice to the upcoming web services and application. Laravel on the other hand which is powered by PHP is also quite resourceful and great for startups and common web applications.

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Christopher Wray
Web Developer at Soltech LLC · | 6 upvotes · 163.4K views

When I started on this project as the sole developer, I was new to web development and I was looking at all of the web frameworks available for the job. I had some experience with Ruby on Rails and I had looked into .net for a bit, but when I found Laravel, it felt like the best framework for me to get the product to market. What made me choose Laravel was the easy to read documentation and active community. Rails had great documentation, but lacked some features built in that I wanted out of the box, while .net had a ton of video documentation tutorials, but nothing as straightforward as Laravels. So far, I am happy with the decision I made, and looking forward to the website release!

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