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Mojolicious
Mojolicious

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Mojolicious vs Rails: What are the differences?

What is Mojolicious? Perl real-time web framework. Back in the early days of the web, many people learned Perl because of a wonderful Perl library called CGI. It was simple enough to get started without knowing much about the language and powerful enough to keep you going, learning by doing was much fun. While most of the techniques used are outdated now, the idea behind it is not. Mojolicious is a new attempt at implementing this idea using state of the art technology.

What is Rails? Web development that doesn't hurt. Rails is a web-application framework that includes everything needed to create database-backed web applications according to the Model-View-Controller (MVC) pattern.

Mojolicious and Rails can be categorized as "Frameworks (Full Stack)" tools.

"Open source" is the primary reason why developers consider Mojolicious over the competitors, whereas "Rapid development" was stated as the key factor in picking Rails.

Mojolicious and Rails are both open source tools. It seems that Rails with 43.6K GitHub stars and 17.5K forks on GitHub has more adoption than Mojolicious with 2.12K GitHub stars and 498 GitHub forks.

According to the StackShare community, Rails has a broader approval, being mentioned in 2321 company stacks & 796 developers stacks; compared to Mojolicious, which is listed in 9 company stacks and 3 developer stacks.

What is Mojolicious?

Back in the early days of the web, many people learned Perl because of a wonderful Perl library called CGI. It was simple enough to get started without knowing much about the language and powerful enough to keep you going, learning by doing was much fun. While most of the techniques used are outdated now, the idea behind it is not. Mojolicious is a new attempt at implementing this idea using state of the art technology.

What is Rails?

Rails is a web-application framework that includes everything needed to create database-backed web applications according to the Model-View-Controller (MVC) pattern.
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    What are some alternatives to Mojolicious and Rails?
    Dancer
    Dancer is a free and open source micro web application framework written in Perl.
    Django
    Django is a high-level Python Web framework that encourages rapid development and clean, pragmatic design.
    Flask
    Flask is intended for getting started very quickly and was developed with best intentions in mind.
    Node.js
    Node.js uses an event-driven, non-blocking I/O model that makes it lightweight and efficient, perfect for data-intensive real-time applications that run across distributed devices.
    ASP.NET
    .NET is a developer platform made up of tools, programming languages, and libraries for building many different types of applications.
    See all alternatives
    Decisions about Mojolicious and Rails
    StackShare Editors
    StackShare Editors
    Rails
    Rails
    Node.js
    Node.js
    Python
    Python
    React
    React
    Java
    Java
    Ruby
    Ruby
    Go
    Go
    Swift
    Swift
    Objective-C
    Objective-C
    jQuery
    jQuery

    By mid-2015, around the time of the Series E, the Digital department at WeWork had grown to more than 40 people to support the company’s growing product needs.

    By then, they’d migrated the main website off of WordPress to Ruby on Rails, and a combination React, Angular, and jQuery, though there were efforts to move entirely to React for the front-end.

    The backend was structured around a microservices architecture built partially in Node.js, along with a combination of Ruby, Python, Bash, and Go. Swift/Objective-C and Java powered the mobile apps.

    These technologies power the listings on the website, as well as various internal tools, like community manager dashboards as well as RFID hardware for access management.

    See more
    Spenser Coke
    Spenser Coke
    Product Engineer at Loanlink.de · | 8 upvotes · 149.5K views
    atLoanlink GmbhLoanlink Gmbh
    Rails
    Rails
    AngularJS
    AngularJS
    .NET
    .NET
    Node.js
    Node.js
    React
    React
    GitHub
    GitHub
    Trello
    Trello
    Zapier
    Zapier
    Mailchimp
    Mailchimp
    Google Drive
    Google Drive
    Vue.js
    Vue.js
    HTML5
    HTML5

    When starting a new company and building a new product w/ limited engineering we chose to optimize for expertise and rapid development, landing on Rails API, w/ AngularJS on the front.

    The reality is that we're building a CRUD app, so we considered going w/ vanilla Rails MVC to optimize velocity early on (it may not be sexy, but it gets the job done). Instead, we opted to split the codebase to allow for a richer front-end experience, focus on skill specificity when hiring, and give us the flexibility to be consumed by multiple clients in the future.

    We also considered .NET core or Node.js for the API layer, and React on the front-end, but our experiences dealing with mature Node APIs and the rapid-fire changes that comes with state management in React-land put us off, given our level of experience with those tools.

    We're using GitHub and Trello to track issues and projects, and a plethora of other tools to help the operational team, like Zapier, MailChimp, Google Drive with some basic Vue.js & HTML5 apps for smaller internal-facing web projects.

    See more
    Russel Werner
    Russel Werner
    Lead Engineer at StackShare · | 19 upvotes · 240.1K views
    atStackShareStackShare
    React
    React
    Glamorous
    Glamorous
    Apollo
    Apollo
    Node.js
    Node.js
    Rails
    Rails
    Heroku
    Heroku
    GitHub
    GitHub
    Amazon S3
    Amazon S3
    Amazon CloudFront
    Amazon CloudFront
    Webpack
    Webpack
    CircleCI
    CircleCI
    Redis
    Redis
    #StackDecisionsLaunch
    #SSR
    #Microservices
    #FrontEndRepoSplit

    StackShare Feed is built entirely with React, Glamorous, and Apollo. One of our objectives with the public launch of the Feed was to enable a Server-side rendered (SSR) experience for our organic search traffic. When you visit the StackShare Feed, and you aren't logged in, you are delivered the Trending feed experience. We use an in-house Node.js rendering microservice to generate this HTML. This microservice needs to run and serve requests independent of our Rails web app. Up until recently, we had a mono-repo with our Rails and React code living happily together and all served from the same web process. In order to deploy our SSR app into a Heroku environment, we needed to split out our front-end application into a separate repo in GitHub. The driving factor in this decision was mostly due to limitations imposed by Heroku specifically with how processes can't communicate with each other. A new SSR app was created in Heroku and linked directly to the frontend repo so it stays in-sync with changes.

    Related to this, we need a way to "deploy" our frontend changes to various server environments without building & releasing the entire Ruby application. We built a hybrid Amazon S3 Amazon CloudFront solution to host our Webpack bundles. A new CircleCI script builds the bundles and uploads them to S3. The final step in our rollout is to update some keys in Redis so our Rails app knows which bundles to serve. The result of these efforts were significant. Our frontend team now moves independently of our backend team, our build & release process takes only a few minutes, we are now using an edge CDN to serve JS assets, and we have pre-rendered React pages!

    #StackDecisionsLaunch #SSR #Microservices #FrontEndRepoSplit

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    Julien DeFrance
    Julien DeFrance
    Principal Software Engineer at Tophatter · | 16 upvotes · 493K views
    atSmartZipSmartZip
    Rails
    Rails
    Rails API
    Rails API
    AWS Elastic Beanstalk
    AWS Elastic Beanstalk
    Capistrano
    Capistrano
    Docker
    Docker
    Amazon S3
    Amazon S3
    Amazon RDS
    Amazon RDS
    MySQL
    MySQL
    Amazon RDS for Aurora
    Amazon RDS for Aurora
    Amazon ElastiCache
    Amazon ElastiCache
    Memcached
    Memcached
    Amazon CloudFront
    Amazon CloudFront
    Segment
    Segment
    Zapier
    Zapier
    Amazon Redshift
    Amazon Redshift
    Amazon Quicksight
    Amazon Quicksight
    Superset
    Superset
    Elasticsearch
    Elasticsearch
    Amazon Elasticsearch Service
    Amazon Elasticsearch Service
    New Relic
    New Relic
    AWS Lambda
    AWS Lambda
    Node.js
    Node.js
    Ruby
    Ruby
    Amazon DynamoDB
    Amazon DynamoDB
    Algolia
    Algolia

    Back in 2014, I was given an opportunity to re-architect SmartZip Analytics platform, and flagship product: SmartTargeting. This is a SaaS software helping real estate professionals keeping up with their prospects and leads in a given neighborhood/territory, finding out (thanks to predictive analytics) who's the most likely to list/sell their home, and running cross-channel marketing automation against them: direct mail, online ads, email... The company also does provide Data APIs to Enterprise customers.

    I had inherited years and years of technical debt and I knew things had to change radically. The first enabler to this was to make use of the cloud and go with AWS, so we would stop re-inventing the wheel, and build around managed/scalable services.

    For the SaaS product, we kept on working with Rails as this was what my team had the most knowledge in. We've however broken up the monolith and decoupled the front-end application from the backend thanks to the use of Rails API so we'd get independently scalable micro-services from now on.

    Our various applications could now be deployed using AWS Elastic Beanstalk so we wouldn't waste any more efforts writing time-consuming Capistrano deployment scripts for instance. Combined with Docker so our application would run within its own container, independently from the underlying host configuration.

    Storage-wise, we went with Amazon S3 and ditched any pre-existing local or network storage people used to deal with in our legacy systems. On the database side: Amazon RDS / MySQL initially. Ultimately migrated to Amazon RDS for Aurora / MySQL when it got released. Once again, here you need a managed service your cloud provider handles for you.

    Future improvements / technology decisions included:

    Caching: Amazon ElastiCache / Memcached CDN: Amazon CloudFront Systems Integration: Segment / Zapier Data-warehousing: Amazon Redshift BI: Amazon Quicksight / Superset Search: Elasticsearch / Amazon Elasticsearch Service / Algolia Monitoring: New Relic

    As our usage grows, patterns changed, and/or our business needs evolved, my role as Engineering Manager then Director of Engineering was also to ensure my team kept on learning and innovating, while delivering on business value.

    One of these innovations was to get ourselves into Serverless : Adopting AWS Lambda was a big step forward. At the time, only available for Node.js (Not Ruby ) but a great way to handle cost efficiency, unpredictable traffic, sudden bursts of traffic... Ultimately you want the whole chain of services involved in a call to be serverless, and that's when we've started leveraging Amazon DynamoDB on these projects so they'd be fully scalable.

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    Francisco Quintero
    Francisco Quintero
    Tech Lead at Dev As Pros · | 7 upvotes · 73.8K views
    atDev As ProsDev As Pros
    Node.js
    Node.js
    Rails
    Rails
    Amazon EC2
    Amazon EC2
    Heroku
    Heroku
    RuboCop
    RuboCop
    JavaScript
    JavaScript
    ESLint
    ESLint
    Slack
    Slack