Alternatives to TerminusDB logo

Alternatives to TerminusDB

Neo4j, Dgraph, Titan, JanusGraph, and Cayley are the most popular alternatives and competitors to TerminusDB.
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What is TerminusDB and what are its top alternatives?

It is a database built for data people. Terminus is a model driven graph database designed specifically for the web-age. The result is unified, well-structured & refined data - the jet fuel of future business. It greatly reduces the time and effort required to build any application that shares, manipulates or edits data.
TerminusDB is a tool in the Graph Databases category of a tech stack.
TerminusDB is an open source tool with 1.6K GitHub stars and 76 GitHub forks. Here’s a link to TerminusDB's open source repository on GitHub

Top Alternatives to TerminusDB

  • Neo4j

    Neo4j

    Neo4j stores data in nodes connected by directed, typed relationships with properties on both, also known as a Property Graph. It is a high performance graph store with all the features expected of a mature and robust database, like a friendly query language and ACID transactions. ...

  • Dgraph

    Dgraph

    Dgraph's goal is to provide Google production level scale and throughput, with low enough latency to be serving real time user queries, over terabytes of structured data. Dgraph supports GraphQL-like query syntax, and responds in JSON and Protocol Buffers over GRPC and HTTP. ...

  • Titan

    Titan

    Titan is a scalable graph database optimized for storing and querying graphs containing hundreds of billions of vertices and edges distributed across a multi-machine cluster. Titan is a transactional database that can support thousands of concurrent users executing complex graph traversals in real time. ...

  • JanusGraph

    JanusGraph

    It is a scalable graph database optimized for storing and querying graphs containing hundreds of billions of vertices and edges distributed across a multi-machine cluster. It is a transactional database that can support thousands of concurrent users executing complex graph traversals in real time. ...

  • Cayley

    Cayley

    Cayley is an open-source graph inspired by the graph database behind Freebase and Google's Knowledge Graph. Its goal is to be a part of the developer's toolbox where Linked Data and graph-shaped data (semantic webs, social networks, etc) in general are concerned. ...

  • RedisGraph

    RedisGraph

    RedisGraph is a graph database developed from scratch on top of Redis, using the new Redis Modules API to extend Redis with new commands and capabilities. Its main features include: - Simple, fast indexing and querying - Data stored in RAM, using memory-efficient custom data structures - On disk persistence - Tabular result sets - Simple and popular graph query language (Cypher) - Data Filtering, Aggregation and ordering ...

  • TypeDB

    TypeDB

    TypeDB is a database with a rich and logical type system. TypeDB empowers you to solve complex problems, using TypeQL as its query language. ...

  • Blazegraph

    Blazegraph

    It is a fully open-source high-performance graph database supporting the RDF data model and RDR. It operates as an embedded database or over a client/server REST API. ...

TerminusDB alternatives & related posts

Neo4j logo

Neo4j

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The world’s leading Graph Database
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1.1K
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PROS OF NEO4J
  • 68
    Cypher – graph query language
  • 58
    Great graphdb
  • 31
    Open source
  • 29
    Rest api
  • 27
    High-Performance Native API
  • 24
    ACID
  • 20
    Easy setup
  • 15
    Great support
  • 10
    Clustering
  • 9
    Hot Backups
  • 8
    Great Web Admin UI
  • 7
    Powerful, flexible data model
  • 7
    Mature
  • 6
    Embeddable
  • 5
    Easy to Use and Model
  • 4
    Best Graphdb
  • 4
    Highly-available
  • 2
    It's awesome, I wanted to try it
  • 2
    Great onboarding process
  • 2
    Great query language and built in data browser
  • 2
    Used by Crunchbase
CONS OF NEO4J
  • 4
    Comparably slow
  • 4
    Can't store a vertex as JSON
  • 1
    Doesn't have a managed cloud service at low cost

related Neo4j posts

We have an in-house build experiment management system. We produce samples as input to the next step, which then could produce 1 sample(1-1) and many samples (1 - many). There are many steps like this. So far, we are tracking genealogy (limited tracking) in the MySQL database, which is becoming hard to trace back to the original material or sample(I can give more details if required). So, we are considering a Graph database. I am requesting advice from the experts.

  1. Is a graph database the right choice, or can we manage with RDBMS?
  2. If RDBMS, which RDMS, which feature, or which approach could make this manageable or sustainable
  3. If Graph database(Neo4j, OrientDB, Azure Cosmos DB, Amazon Neptune, ArangoDB), which one is good, and what are the best practices?

I am sorry that this might be a loaded question.

See more

I'm evaluating the use of RedisGraph vs Microsoft SQL Server 2019 graph features to build a social graph. One of the key criteria is high availability and cross data center replication of data. While Neo4j is a much-matured solution in general, I'm not accounting for it due to the cost & introduction of a new stack in the ecosystem. Also, due to the nature of data & org policies, using a cloud-based solution won't be a viable choice.

We currently use Redis as a cache & SQL server 2019 as RDBMS.

I'm inclining towards SQL server 2019 graph as we already use SQL server extensively as relational database & have all the HA and cross data center replication setup readily available. I still need to evaluate if it fulfills our need as a graph DB though, I also learned that SQL server 2019 is still a new player in the market and attempts to fit a graph-like query on top of a relational model (with node and edge tables). RedisGraph seems very promising. However, I'm not totally sure about HA, Graph data backup, cross-data center support.

See more
Dgraph logo

Dgraph

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164
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Fast, Distributed Graph DB
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+ 1
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PROS OF DGRAPH
  • 3
    Graphql as a query language is nice if you like apollo
  • 2
    Low learning curve
  • 1
    High Performance
  • 1
    Open Source
  • 1
    Easy set up
CONS OF DGRAPH
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    related Dgraph posts

    Titan logo

    Titan

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    49
    0
    Distributed Graph Database
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    49
    + 1
    0
    PROS OF TITAN
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      CONS OF TITAN
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        related Titan posts

        JanusGraph logo

        JanusGraph

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        71
        0
        Open-source, distributed graph database
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        71
        + 1
        0
        PROS OF JANUSGRAPH
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          CONS OF JANUSGRAPH
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            related JanusGraph posts

            Cayley logo

            Cayley

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            66
            5
            An open-source graph database
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            66
            + 1
            5
            PROS OF CAYLEY
            • 5
              Full open source
            CONS OF CAYLEY
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              related Cayley posts

              RedisGraph logo

              RedisGraph

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              A High Performance In-Memory Graph Database as a Redis Module
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              6
              PROS OF REDISGRAPH
              • 2
                Cypher – graph query language
              • 2
                10x – 600x faster than any other graph database
              • 1
                Great graphdb
              • 1
                Open source
              CONS OF REDISGRAPH
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                related RedisGraph posts

                I'm evaluating the use of RedisGraph vs Microsoft SQL Server 2019 graph features to build a social graph. One of the key criteria is high availability and cross data center replication of data. While Neo4j is a much-matured solution in general, I'm not accounting for it due to the cost & introduction of a new stack in the ecosystem. Also, due to the nature of data & org policies, using a cloud-based solution won't be a viable choice.

                We currently use Redis as a cache & SQL server 2019 as RDBMS.

                I'm inclining towards SQL server 2019 graph as we already use SQL server extensively as relational database & have all the HA and cross data center replication setup readily available. I still need to evaluate if it fulfills our need as a graph DB though, I also learned that SQL server 2019 is still a new player in the market and attempts to fit a graph-like query on top of a relational model (with node and edge tables). RedisGraph seems very promising. However, I'm not totally sure about HA, Graph data backup, cross-data center support.

                See more
                TypeDB logo

                TypeDB

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                A strongly typed database
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                + 1
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                PROS OF TYPEDB
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                  CONS OF TYPEDB
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                    related TypeDB posts

                    Blazegraph logo

                    Blazegraph

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                    An ultra-high performance database for big graphs offering both Semantic Web and Graph Database
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                    PROS OF BLAZEGRAPH
                    • 1
                      Support for SPARQL
                    • 1
                      Easy Setup and Use
                    • 1
                      Support for RDF
                    CONS OF BLAZEGRAPH
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                      related Blazegraph posts