Alternatives to AVA logo

Alternatives to AVA

Jest, EVA, Mocha, Cypress, and Jasmine are the most popular alternatives and competitors to AVA.
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What is AVA and what are its top alternatives?

Even though JavaScript is single-threaded, IO in Node.js can happen in parallel due to its async nature. AVA takes advantage of this and runs your tests concurrently, which is especially beneficial for IO heavy tests. In addition, test files are run in parallel as separate processes, giving you even better performance and an isolated environment for each test file.
AVA is a tool in the Javascript Testing Framework category of a tech stack.
AVA is an open source tool with GitHub stars and GitHub forks. Here’s a link to AVA's open source repository on GitHub

Top Alternatives to AVA

  • Jest
    Jest

    Jest provides you with multiple layers on top of Jasmine.

  • EVA
    EVA

    Equipping you with hundreds of symbols and dozens or styles configurations, it makes sure the design stays consistent across all of your applications and platforms. ...

  • Mocha
    Mocha

    Mocha is a feature-rich JavaScript test framework running on node.js and the browser, making asynchronous testing simple and fun. Mocha tests run serially, allowing for flexible and accurate reporting, while mapping uncaught exceptions to the correct test cases. ...

  • Cypress
    Cypress

    Cypress is a front end automated testing application created for the modern web. Cypress is built on a new architecture and runs in the same run-loop as the application being tested. As a result Cypress provides better, faster, and more reliable testing for anything that runs in a browser. Cypress works on any front-end framework or website. ...

  • Jasmine
    Jasmine

    Jasmine is a Behavior Driven Development testing framework for JavaScript. It does not rely on browsers, DOM, or any JavaScript framework. Thus it's suited for websites, Node.js projects, or anywhere that JavaScript can run. ...

  • Chai
    Chai

    It is a BDD / TDD assertion library for node and the browser that can be delightfully paired with any javascript testing framework. It has several interfaces that allow the developer to choose the most comfortable. The chain-capable BDD styles provide an expressive language & readable style, while the TDD assert style provides a more classical feel. ...

  • Protractor
    Protractor

    Protractor is an end-to-end test framework for Angular and AngularJS applications. Protractor runs tests against your application running in a real browser, interacting with it as a user would. ...

  • Enzyme
    Enzyme

    Enzyme is a JavaScript Testing utility for React that makes it easier to assert, manipulate, and traverse your React Components' output. ...

AVA alternatives & related posts

Jest logo

Jest

3.6K
2.8K
169
Painless JavaScript Unit Testing
3.6K
2.8K
+ 1
169
PROS OF JEST
  • 35
    Open source
  • 31
    Mock by default makes testing much simpler
  • 22
    Testing React Native Apps
  • 19
    Parallel test running
  • 15
    Fast
  • 13
    Bundled with JSDOM to enable DOM testing
  • 8
    Mock by default screws up your classes, breaking tests
  • 7
    Out of the box code coverage
  • 6
    Promise support
  • 6
    One stop shop for unit testing
  • 3
    Great documentation
  • 2
    Assert Library Included
  • 1
    Built in watch option with interactive filtering menu
  • 1
    Preset support
  • 0
    Karma
  • 0
    Can be used for BDD
CONS OF JEST
  • 3
    Ambiguous configuration
  • 3
    Difficult
  • 3
    Documentation
  • 2
    Many bugs still not fixed months/years after reporting
  • 2
    Multiple error messages for same error
  • 2
    Difficult to run single test/describe/file
  • 2
    Ambiguous
  • 2
    Bugged
  • 1
    Slow
  • 1
    Reporter is too general
  • 1
    BeforeAll timing out makes all passing tests fail
  • 1
    Unstable
  • 1
    Bad docs
  • 1
    Still does't support .mjs files natively
  • 1
    Can't fail beforeAll to abort tests
  • 0
    Interaction with watch mode on terminal

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Robert Zuber

We are in the process of adopting Next.js as our React framework and using Storybook to help build our React components in isolation. This new part of our frontend is written in TypeScript, and we use Emotion for CSS/styling. For delivering data, we use GraphQL and Apollo. Jest, Percy, and Cypress are used for testing.

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Shared insights
on
CypressCypressJestJest

As we all know testing is an important part of any application. To assist with our testing we are going to use both Cypress and Jest. We feel these tools complement each other and will help us get good coverage of our code. We will use Cypress for our end to end testing as we've found it quite user friendly. Jest will be used for our unit tests because we've seen how many larger companies use it with great success.

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EVA logo

EVA

5
13
0
A Customizable Design System easily adaptable to your Brand
5
13
+ 1
0
PROS OF EVA
    Be the first to leave a pro
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      Mocha logo

      Mocha

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      2.7K
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      Simple, flexible, fun javascript test framework for node.js & the browser
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      2.7K
      + 1
      430
      PROS OF MOCHA
      • 137
        Open source
      • 102
        Simple
      • 81
        Promise support
      • 48
        Flexible
      • 29
        Easy to add support for Generators
      • 12
        For browser and server testing
      • 7
        Curstom assertion libraries
      • 5
        Works with Karma
      • 3
        No other better tools
      • 1
        Simple setup
      • 1
        Works with saucelabs
      • 1
        Lots of tutorials and help online
      • 1
        Default reporter is nice, clean, and itemized
      • 1
        Works with BrowserStack
      • 1
        Simple integration testing
      CONS OF MOCHA
      • 3
        Cannot test a promisified functions without assertion
      • 2
        No assertion count in results
      • 1
        Not as many reporter options as Jest

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      I use both mocha and Jest because:

      • I don't care whether teams use Jest or Mocha. But jest is way too overhyped. Most devs are writing integration tests and think that it's so much better but frankly I don't write integration tests as the way to get both design feedback and confidence when I code. I adhere to the test pyramid, not ice cream cone or the dumb "trophy"

      • I TDD, so I only ever use the "API" of test frameworks. I don't do a lot of integration tests for TDD and all the bells and whistles Jest provides you from the command-line I just don't need. And I certainly do not care about or touch Jest Snapshots, I despise them

      • My tests are fast enough because I write isolated tests with TDD, so I don't run into performance issues. Example: I write my tests in a way that I can run 300 tests in literally 1 second with mocha. So the Jest ability to pinpoint and only run those tests which are affected by code changes. I want to run all of them every time when I TDD. It's a different mindset when you TDD

      • I also mainly code in IntelliJ or WebStorm because I feel the tools in that IDE far surpass VSCode and I also love running the test UI runner in it vs. lousy command-line

      • I feel both mocha and Jest read just fine in terms of code readability. Jest might have shorter assertion syntax but I don't really care. I just care that I can read the damn test and my tests are written well and my test descriptions, as well as the code itself including constants represent business language, not technical. I care most about BDD, clean code, 4 rules of simple design, and SOLID

      • I don't like using mock frameworks so no I don't use Jest's Mocking framework. I don't have to mock a lot in my tests due to the nature of how I strive to code...I keep my design simple and modular using principals such as clean code and 4 rules of simple design. If I must mock, I create very simple custom mocks with JS

      • On the contrary to the belief that integration tests and mount are the way to go (this belief drives me absolutely crazy, especially Dodd's promoting that), I TDD with shallow & enzyme. My tests are simple. My design is driven by my tests and my tests give me quick and useful feedback. I have a course I'm working on coming out soon on TDD with React to show you how to truly test the FE and why the ice cream cone and trophy suck (you're being scammed people). Watch for that here: https://twitter.com/DaveSchinkel/status/1062267649235791873

      Don't forget to upvote this post!

      Mocha Jest JavaScript React @jsdom Enzyme #tdd #bdd #testdrivendevelopment

      See more
      Jack Graves
      Head of Product Development at Automation Consultants · | 4 upvotes · 152.9K views

      We use JUnit and Jest to perform the bulk of our automated test scenarios, with additional work with Apache JMeter for performance testing - for example, the Atlassian Data Center compliance testing is performed with JMeter. Jest provides testing for the React interfaces, which make up the backend of our App offerings. JUnit is used for Unit Testing our Server-based Apps. Mocha is another tool we use.

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      Cypress logo

      Cypress

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      When testing is easy, developers build better things faster and with confidence.
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      PROS OF CYPRESS
      • 28
        Open source
      • 21
        Great documentation
      • 19
        Simple usage
      • 18
        Fast
      • 10
        Cross Browser testing
      • 9
        Easy us with CI
      • 5
        Npm install cypress only
      • 1
        Good for beginner automation engineers
      CONS OF CYPRESS
      • 20
        Cypress is weak at cross-browser testing
      • 13
        Switch tabs : Cypress can'nt support
      • 12
        No iFrame support
      • 9
        No multiple domain support
      • 9
        No page object support
      • 8
        No file upload support
      • 8
        No support for multiple tab control
      • 8
        No xPath support
      • 7
        No support for Safari
      • 7
        Cypress doesn't support native app
      • 7
        Re-run failed tests retries not supported yet
      • 7
        No support for multiple browser control
      • 4
        Adobe
      • 4
        Using a non-standard automation protocol
      • 4
        Not freeware
      • 4
        $20/user/thread for reports
      • 3
        No 'WD wire protocol' support

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      Robert Zuber

      We are in the process of adopting Next.js as our React framework and using Storybook to help build our React components in isolation. This new part of our frontend is written in TypeScript, and we use Emotion for CSS/styling. For delivering data, we use GraphQL and Apollo. Jest, Percy, and Cypress are used for testing.

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      Jasmine logo

      Jasmine

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      • 49
        Open source
      • 18
        Originally from RSpec
      • 15
        Great community
      • 14
        No dependencies, not even DOM
      • 10
        Easy to setup
      • 8
        Simple
      • 3
        Created by Pivotal-Labs
      • 2
        Works with KarmaJs
      • 1
        Jasmine is faster than selenium in angular application
      • 1
        SpyOn to fake calls
      • 1
        Async and promises are easy calls with "done"
      CONS OF JASMINE
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      CEO at Scrayos UG (haftungsbeschränkt) · | 6 upvotes · 209.6K views

      For our internal team and collaboration panel we use Nuxt.js (with TypeScript that is transpiled into ES6), Webpack and npm. We enjoy the opinionated nature of Nuxt.js over vanilla Vue.js, as we would end up using all of the components Nuxt.js incorporates anyways and we can adhere to the conventions setup by the Nuxt.js project, which allows us to get better support in case we run into any dead ends. Webpack allows us to create reproducable builds and also debug our application with hot reloads, which greately increased the pace at which we are able to perform and test changes. We also incorporated a lot of testing (ESLint, Chai, Jasmine, Nightwatchjs) into our pipelines and can trigger those jobs through GitLab CI. All packages are fetched through npm, so that we can keep our git repositories slim and are notified of new updates aswell as reported security flaws.

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      Sai Chaitanya Mankala
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      Chai logo

      Chai

      539
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          Joshua Dean Küpper
          CEO at Scrayos UG (haftungsbeschränkt) · | 6 upvotes · 209.6K views

          For our internal team and collaboration panel we use Nuxt.js (with TypeScript that is transpiled into ES6), Webpack and npm. We enjoy the opinionated nature of Nuxt.js over vanilla Vue.js, as we would end up using all of the components Nuxt.js incorporates anyways and we can adhere to the conventions setup by the Nuxt.js project, which allows us to get better support in case we run into any dead ends. Webpack allows us to create reproducable builds and also debug our application with hot reloads, which greately increased the pace at which we are able to perform and test changes. We also incorporated a lot of testing (ESLint, Chai, Jasmine, Nightwatchjs) into our pipelines and can trigger those jobs through GitLab CI. All packages are fetched through npm, so that we can keep our git repositories slim and are notified of new updates aswell as reported security flaws.

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          React LoopBack Node.js ExpressJS Elasticsearch Kibana Logstash Sequelize Mocha Chai Visual Studio Code are the combo of technologies being used by me to build BestPrice Extension with all its micro-services & Web-based fragments

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          Protractor logo

          Protractor

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          End-to-end test framework for Angular and AngularJS applications
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          PROS OF PROTRACTOR
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          Enzyme logo

          Enzyme

          415
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          JavaScript Testing utilities for React, by Airbnb
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              Russel Werner
              Lead Engineer at StackShare · | 7 upvotes · 154.8K views

              We use Jest because when we rebooted our "front end" stack earlier last year, we need to have a testing solution (we didn't have any front-end tests before that!). Jest is fast and convenient and it has plenty of community support behind it. It let's us run our unit tests with Enzyme and snapshot tests.

              This is an area that we are constantly reviewing to see what can be improved, both in terms of developer needs, accuracy, test maintainability, and coverage.

              I'm currently exploring using React Storybook to be the record of snapshot tests and using some online services, such as Happo.io and Percy in our CI pipeline.

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              I use both mocha and Jest because:

              • I don't care whether teams use Jest or Mocha. But jest is way too overhyped. Most devs are writing integration tests and think that it's so much better but frankly I don't write integration tests as the way to get both design feedback and confidence when I code. I adhere to the test pyramid, not ice cream cone or the dumb "trophy"

              • I TDD, so I only ever use the "API" of test frameworks. I don't do a lot of integration tests for TDD and all the bells and whistles Jest provides you from the command-line I just don't need. And I certainly do not care about or touch Jest Snapshots, I despise them

              • My tests are fast enough because I write isolated tests with TDD, so I don't run into performance issues. Example: I write my tests in a way that I can run 300 tests in literally 1 second with mocha. So the Jest ability to pinpoint and only run those tests which are affected by code changes. I want to run all of them every time when I TDD. It's a different mindset when you TDD

              • I also mainly code in IntelliJ or WebStorm because I feel the tools in that IDE far surpass VSCode and I also love running the test UI runner in it vs. lousy command-line

              • I feel both mocha and Jest read just fine in terms of code readability. Jest might have shorter assertion syntax but I don't really care. I just care that I can read the damn test and my tests are written well and my test descriptions, as well as the code itself including constants represent business language, not technical. I care most about BDD, clean code, 4 rules of simple design, and SOLID

              • I don't like using mock frameworks so no I don't use Jest's Mocking framework. I don't have to mock a lot in my tests due to the nature of how I strive to code...I keep my design simple and modular using principals such as clean code and 4 rules of simple design. If I must mock, I create very simple custom mocks with JS

              • On the contrary to the belief that integration tests and mount are the way to go (this belief drives me absolutely crazy, especially Dodd's promoting that), I TDD with shallow & enzyme. My tests are simple. My design is driven by my tests and my tests give me quick and useful feedback. I have a course I'm working on coming out soon on TDD with React to show you how to truly test the FE and why the ice cream cone and trophy suck (you're being scammed people). Watch for that here: https://twitter.com/DaveSchinkel/status/1062267649235791873

              Don't forget to upvote this post!

              Mocha Jest JavaScript React @jsdom Enzyme #tdd #bdd #testdrivendevelopment

              See more