Alternatives to CodeKit logo

Alternatives to CodeKit

Webpack, Sublime Text, gulp, Prepros, and NetBeans IDE are the most popular alternatives and competitors to CodeKit.
69
103
+ 1
28

What is CodeKit and what are its top alternatives?

CodeKit is a front-end build tool that helps web developers automate tasks such as compilation, minification, and optimization of code. Key features of CodeKit include live browser reloading, support for various preprocessors like Sass and Less, and built-in image optimization. However, CodeKit is only available for macOS users and comes with a price tag, which might not be suitable for all developers.

  1. Webpack: Webpack is a popular open-source module bundler that helps manage JavaScript applications. It supports code splitting, hot module replacement, and tree shaking. Pros: Highly customizable, extensive plugins ecosystem. Cons: Steeper learning curve compared to CodeKit.
  2. Gulp: Gulp is a task runner that automates repetitive tasks in web development. It uses Node.js streams for fast and efficient build processes. Pros: Flexibility, large community support. Cons: Requires knowledge of Node.js and build configuration.
  3. Grunt: Grunt is another popular task runner that automates repetitive tasks such as minification, compilation, and unit testing. It uses configuration-based approach. Pros: Easy to configure, extensive plugin ecosystem. Cons: Configuration can be verbose.
  4. Parcel: Parcel is a zero-config web application bundler that offers fast performance out of the box. It supports various file types and requires no configuration setup. Pros: Easy to use, fast bundling process. Cons: Limited customization options compared to CodeKit.
  5. Rollup: Rollup is a module bundler that focuses on producing smaller, faster JavaScript bundles. It supports tree shaking and code splitting out of the box. Pros: Efficient bundle output, tree shaking support. Cons: Less beginner-friendly compared to CodeKit.
  6. Brunch: Brunch is an ultra-fast build tool for modern web development. It offers a simple configuration with support for JavaScript, CSS, and HTML compilation. Pros: Fast build times, easy setup. Cons: Limited plugin ecosystem compared to CodeKit.
  7. Broccoli: Broccoli is a build tool that offers a fast and reliable build pipeline for web applications. It supports incremental rebuilds and provides a flexible plugin system. Pros: Incremental builds, flexible plugin system. Cons: Requires familiarity with Brocfile.js configuration.
  8. FuseBox: FuseBox is a powerful bundler that offers excellent performance and flexibility for web developers. It supports dynamic imports, automatic code splitting, and hot module replacement. Pros: Fast compilation times, dynamic imports support. Cons: Limited documentation compared to CodeKit.
  9. Snowpack: Snowpack is a modern build tool that focuses on faster development workflows by leveraging ES modules. It offers near instant startup and fast development server. Pros: Fast development server, ES module support. Cons: Limited features compared to CodeKit.
  10. Browserify: Browserify is a popular JavaScript bundler that brings Node.js modules to the browser. It allows developers to use npm modules in the browser environment. Pros: Seamless Node.js integration, large package ecosystem. Cons: Requires additional tools for tasks like minification and optimization.

Top Alternatives to CodeKit

  • Webpack
    Webpack

    A bundler for javascript and friends. Packs many modules into a few bundled assets. Code Splitting allows to load parts for the application on demand. Through "loaders" modules can be CommonJs, AMD, ES6 modules, CSS, Images, JSON, Coffeescript, LESS, ... and your custom stuff. ...

  • Sublime Text
    Sublime Text

    Sublime Text is available for OS X, Windows and Linux. One license is all you need to use Sublime Text on every computer you own, no matter what operating system it uses. Sublime Text uses a custom UI toolkit, optimized for speed and beauty, while taking advantage of native functionality on each platform. ...

  • gulp
    gulp

    Build system automating tasks: minification and copying of all JavaScript files, static images. More capable of watching files to automatically rerun the task when a file changes. ...

  • Prepros
    Prepros

    It is an interface tool which handles pre-processing, and other front-end tasks. Its greatest strength is the incredible ease with which it allows you to use pre-processors of various kinds, be they for CSS, HTML or JavaScript. ...

  • NetBeans IDE
    NetBeans IDE

    NetBeans IDE is FREE, open source, and has a worldwide community of users and developers. ...

  • Coda
    Coda

    It is a new doc for teams. It begins with a blinking cursor and grows as big as your team’s ambition. Coda docs do everything from run weekly meetings to launch products. ...

  • Ghostlab
    Ghostlab

    It is a Mac based app that allows you to test out your responsive design across a variety of devices and browsers ...

  • JavaScript
    JavaScript

    JavaScript is most known as the scripting language for Web pages, but used in many non-browser environments as well such as node.js or Apache CouchDB. It is a prototype-based, multi-paradigm scripting language that is dynamic,and supports object-oriented, imperative, and functional programming styles. ...

CodeKit alternatives & related posts

Webpack logo

Webpack

40.2K
27.2K
752
A bundler for javascript and friends
40.2K
27.2K
+ 1
752
PROS OF WEBPACK
  • 309
    Most powerful bundler
  • 182
    Built-in dev server with livereload
  • 142
    Can handle all types of assets
  • 87
    Easy configuration
  • 22
    Laravel-mix
  • 4
    Overengineered, Underdeveloped
  • 2
    Makes it easy to bundle static assets
  • 2
    Webpack-Encore
  • 1
    Redundant
  • 1
    Better support in Browser Dev-Tools
CONS OF WEBPACK
  • 15
    Hard to configure
  • 5
    No clear direction
  • 2
    Spaghetti-Code out of the box
  • 2
    SystemJS integration is quite lackluster
  • 2
    Loader architecture is quite a mess (unreliable/buggy)
  • 2
    Fire and Forget mentality of Core-Developers

related Webpack posts

Russel Werner
Lead Engineer at StackShare · | 32 upvotes · 2.6M views

StackShare Feed is built entirely with React, Glamorous, and Apollo. One of our objectives with the public launch of the Feed was to enable a Server-side rendered (SSR) experience for our organic search traffic. When you visit the StackShare Feed, and you aren't logged in, you are delivered the Trending feed experience. We use an in-house Node.js rendering microservice to generate this HTML. This microservice needs to run and serve requests independent of our Rails web app. Up until recently, we had a mono-repo with our Rails and React code living happily together and all served from the same web process. In order to deploy our SSR app into a Heroku environment, we needed to split out our front-end application into a separate repo in GitHub. The driving factor in this decision was mostly due to limitations imposed by Heroku specifically with how processes can't communicate with each other. A new SSR app was created in Heroku and linked directly to the frontend repo so it stays in-sync with changes.

Related to this, we need a way to "deploy" our frontend changes to various server environments without building & releasing the entire Ruby application. We built a hybrid Amazon S3 Amazon CloudFront solution to host our Webpack bundles. A new CircleCI script builds the bundles and uploads them to S3. The final step in our rollout is to update some keys in Redis so our Rails app knows which bundles to serve. The result of these efforts were significant. Our frontend team now moves independently of our backend team, our build & release process takes only a few minutes, we are now using an edge CDN to serve JS assets, and we have pre-rendered React pages!

#StackDecisionsLaunch #SSR #Microservices #FrontEndRepoSplit

See more
Jonathan Pugh
Software Engineer / Project Manager / Technical Architect · | 25 upvotes · 3M views

I needed to choose a full stack of tools for cross platform mobile application design & development. After much research and trying different tools, these are what I came up with that work for me today:

For the client coding I chose Framework7 because of its performance, easy learning curve, and very well designed, beautiful UI widgets. I think it's perfect for solo development or small teams. I didn't like React Native. It felt heavy to me and rigid. Framework7 allows the use of #CSS3, which I think is the best technology to come out of the #WWW movement. No other tech has been able to allow designers and developers to develop such flexible, high performance, customisable user interface elements that are highly responsive and hardware accelerated before. Now #CSS3 includes variables and flexboxes it is truly a powerful language and there is no longer a need for preprocessors such as #SCSS / #Sass / #less. React Native contains a very limited interpretation of #CSS3 which I found very frustrating after using #CSS3 for some years already and knowing its powerful features. The other very nice feature of Framework7 is that you can even build for the browser if you want your app to be available for desktop web browsers. The latest release also includes the ability to build for #Electron so you can have MacOS, Windows and Linux desktop apps. This is not possible with React Native yet.

Framework7 runs on top of Apache Cordova. Cordova and webviews have been slated as being slow in the past. Having a game developer background I found the tweeks to make it run as smooth as silk. One of those tweeks is to use WKWebView. Another important one was using srcset on images.

I use #Template7 for the for the templating system which is a no-nonsense mobile-centric #HandleBars style extensible templating system. It's easy to write custom helpers for, is fast and has a small footprint. I'm not forced into a new paradigm or learning some new syntax. It operates with standard JavaScript, HTML5 and CSS 3. It's written by the developer of Framework7 and so dovetails with it as expected.

I configured TypeScript to work with the latest version of Framework7. I consider TypeScript to be one of the best creations to come out of Microsoft in some time. They must have an amazing team working on it. It's very powerful and flexible. It helps you catch a lot of bugs and also provides code completion in supporting IDEs. So for my IDE I use Visual Studio Code which is a blazingly fast and silky smooth editor that integrates seamlessly with TypeScript for the ultimate type checking setup (both products are produced by Microsoft).

I use Webpack and Babel to compile the JavaScript. TypeScript can compile to JavaScript directly but Babel offers a few more options and polyfills so you can use the latest (and even prerelease) JavaScript features today and compile to be backwards compatible with virtually any browser. My favorite recent addition is "optional chaining" which greatly simplifies and increases readability of a number of sections of my code dealing with getting and setting data in nested objects.

I use some Ruby scripts to process images with ImageMagick and pngquant to optimise for size and even auto insert responsive image code into the HTML5. Ruby is the ultimate cross platform scripting language. Even as your scripts become large, Ruby allows you to refactor your code easily and make it Object Oriented if necessary. I find it the quickest and easiest way to maintain certain aspects of my build process.

For the user interface design and prototyping I use Figma. Figma has an almost identical user interface to #Sketch but has the added advantage of being cross platform (MacOS and Windows). Its real-time collaboration features are outstanding and I use them a often as I work mostly on remote projects. Clients can collaborate in real-time and see changes I make as I make them. The clickable prototyping features in Figma are also very well designed and mean I can send clickable prototypes to clients to try user interface updates as they are made and get immediate feedback. I'm currently also evaluating the latest version of #AdobeXD as an alternative to Figma as it has the very cool auto-animate feature. It doesn't have real-time collaboration yet, but I heard it is proposed for 2019.

For the UI icons I use Font Awesome Pro. They have the largest selection and best looking icons you can find on the internet with several variations in styles so you can find most of the icons you want for standard projects.

For the backend I was using the #GraphCool Framework. As I later found out, #GraphQL still has some way to go in order to provide the full power of a mature graph query language so later in my project I ripped out #GraphCool and replaced it with CouchDB and Pouchdb. Primarily so I could provide good offline app support. CouchDB with Pouchdb is very flexible and efficient combination and overcomes some of the restrictions I found in #GraphQL and hence #GraphCool also. The most impressive and important feature of CouchDB is its replication. You can configure it in various ways for backups, fault tolerance, caching or conditional merging of databases. CouchDB and Pouchdb even supports storing, retrieving and serving binary or image data or other mime types. This removes a level of complexity usually present in database implementations where binary or image data is usually referenced through an #HTML5 link. With CouchDB and Pouchdb apps can operate offline and sync later, very efficiently, when the network connection is good.

I use PhoneGap when testing the app. It auto-reloads your app when its code is changed and you can also install it on Android phones to preview your app instantly. iOS is a bit more tricky cause of Apple's policies so it's not available on the App Store, but you can build it and install it yourself to your device.

So that's my latest mobile stack. What tools do you use? Have you tried these ones?

See more
Sublime Text logo

Sublime Text

33.2K
27.3K
4K
A sophisticated text editor for code, markup and prose.
33.2K
27.3K
+ 1
4K
PROS OF SUBLIME TEXT
  • 720
    Lightweight
  • 652
    Plugins
  • 641
    Super fast
  • 468
    Great code editor
  • 442
    Cross platform
  • 280
    Nice UI
  • 260
    Unlimited trial
  • 153
    Cmd + d is the best command ever
  • 92
    Great community
  • 46
    Package control, modules
  • 26
    Mac OS X support
  • 23
    Easy to get started with
  • 22
    Monokai
  • 21
    Everything you need without the bloat
  • 21
    Built in Python
  • 18
    Easy
  • 14
    Speed
  • 12
    Session & edit resuming
  • 10
    Package Control
  • 9
    Well Designed
  • 8
    Multiple selections
  • 7
    ALT + CMD + DOWN is the best command ever
  • 7
    Nice
  • 7
    Fast, simple and lightweight
  • 5
    It's easy to use, beautiful, simple, and plugins rule
  • 5
    So futuristic and convenient
  • 5
    ALT + F3 the best command ever
  • 5
    Great
  • 4
    Find anything fast within entire project
  • 4
    Easy to use
  • 4
    Free
  • 4
    Simple and clean design
  • 3
    Hackable
  • 3
    Pretty
  • 3
    UI + plugins
  • 3
    Sublime Merge (Git Integration)
  • 2
    Totally customizable
  • 2
    Color schemes and cmd+d
  • 2
    Material theme best theme forever
  • 0
    Const
CONS OF SUBLIME TEXT
  • 8
    Steep learning curve
  • 6
    Everything
  • 4
    Flexibility to move file
  • 4
    Number of plugins doing the same thing
  • 4
    Doesn't act like a Mac app
  • 3
    Not open sourced
  • 2
    Don't have flutter integration
  • 2
    Forces you to buy license

related Sublime Text posts

Johnny Bell

I've been in the #frontend game for about 7 years now. I started coding in Sublime Text because all of the tutorials I was doing back then everyone was using it. I found the speed amazing compared to some other tools at the time. I kept using Sublime Text for about 4-5 years.

I find Sublime Text lacks some functionality, after all it is just a text editor rather than a full fledged IDE. I finally converted over to PhpStorm as I was working with Magento and Magento as you know is mainly #PHP based.

This was amazing all the features in PhpStorm I loved, the debugging features, and the control click feature when you click on a dependency or linked file it will take you to that file. It was great.

PhpStorm is kind of slow, I found that Prettier was taking a long time to format my code, and it just was lagging a lot so I was looking for alternatives. After watching some more tutorial videos I noticed that everyone was using Visual Studio Code. So I gave it a go, and its amazing.

It has support for everything I need with the plugins and the integration with Git is amazing. The speed of this IDE is blazing fast, and I wouldn't go back to using PhpStorm anymore. I highly recommend giving Visual Studio Code a try!

See more
Labinator Team

At labinator.com, we use HTML5, CSS 3, Sass, Vanilla.JS and PHP when building our premium WordPress themes and plugins. When writing our codes, we use Sublime Text and Visual Studio Code depending on the project. We run Manjaro and Debian operating systems in our office. Manjaro is a great desktop operating system for all range of tasks while Debian is a solid choice for servers.

WordPress became a very popular choice when it comes to content management systems and building websites. It is easy to learn and has a great community behind it. The high number of plugins as well that are available for WordPress allows any user to customize it depending on his/her needs.

For development, HTML5 with Sass is our go-to choice when building our themes.

Main Advantages Of Sass:

  • It's CSS syntax friendly
  • It offers variables
  • It uses a nested syntax
  • It includes mixins
  • Great community and online support.
  • Great documentation that is easy to read and follow.

As for PHP, we always thrive to use PHP 7.3+. After the introduction of PHP 7, the WordPress development process became more stable and reliable than before. If you a developer considering PHP 7.3+ for your project, it would be good to note the following benefits.

The Benefits Of Using PHP:

  • Open Source.
  • Highly Extendible.
  • Easy to learn and read.
  • Platform independent.
  • Compatible with APACHE.
  • Low development and maintenance cost.
  • Great community and support.
  • Detailed documentation that has everything you need!

Why PHP 7.3+?

  • Flexible Heredoc & Nowdoc Syntaxes - Two key methods for defining strings within PHP. They also became easier to read and more reliable.
  • A good boost in performance speed which is extremely important when it comes to WordPress development.
See more
gulp logo

gulp

14.1K
9K
1.7K
The streaming build system
14.1K
9K
+ 1
1.7K
PROS OF GULP
  • 451
    Build speed
  • 277
    Readable
  • 244
    Code-over-configuration
  • 210
    Open source
  • 175
    Node streams
  • 107
    Intuitive
  • 83
    Lots of plugins
  • 66
    Works great with browserify
  • 45
    Easy to Learn
  • 17
    Laravel-elixir
  • 4
    build workflow
  • 3
    Simple & flexible
  • 3
    Great community
  • 2
    Stylus intergration
  • 2
    Clean Code
  • 2
    jade intergration
  • 0
    Well documented
CONS OF GULP
    Be the first to leave a con

    related gulp posts

    In 2014, PagerDuty struggled with safely releasing reliable mobile applications to users due to some issues with how the code was being packaged and handled.

    PagerDuty’s mobile apps are hybrid and used Cordova to share code between platforms. Coding was straightforward but packaging was not, as a separated Gulp-based build process was also being used. The PagerDuty team took a page from Java and started creating software artifacts.

    Rather than checking in transformed code or publishing modules to NPM, the team started creating zipped-up build artifacts, which coincided perfectly with GitHub's Releases feature which arrived in 2013. So despite JavaScript lacking a standard packaged app format like a JAR, PagerDuty was still able to improve the build times and sizes of their mobile apps.

    See more
    Omid Farhang
    Sr. Full Stack Developer · | 12 upvotes · 145.4K views

    Developing static sites like a landing page for mobile app or just a personal resume using HTML5 and Bootstrap is a lot fun when you are using build tools like gulp . I made a personal resume using above tools and published them on GitHub Pages. It was fast and easy, Thanks to GitHub for the free service. All the JavaScript codes worked perfectly after being concat and minified and uglified by gulp and running perfectly on GitHub Pages. gulp created sitemap and inserted Google Analytics code into all pages and saved about 30% of images size by compressing them during build.

    See more
    Prepros logo

    Prepros

    24
    39
    21
    Compile Sass, Less, Stylus, Jade, CoffeeScript on Mac, Windows & Linux with Live Browser Reload
    24
    39
    + 1
    21
    PROS OF PREPROS
    • 4
      Easy to use
    • 4
      Beautiful GUI
    • 4
      Easy to configure
    • 3
      FTP upload
    • 2
      Freemium
    • 2
      Live reload
    • 2
      Any editor OK
    CONS OF PREPROS
      Be the first to leave a con

      related Prepros posts

      NetBeans IDE logo

      NetBeans IDE

      685
      946
      514
      Quickly and easily develop desktop, mobile and web applications with Java, HTML5, PHP, C/C++ and more
      685
      946
      + 1
      514
      PROS OF NETBEANS IDE
      • 76
        Rich features
      • 69
        Crossplatform
      • 49
        Plugins(Git, SVN)
      • 38
        Easy to use
      • 38
        Extensible
      • 35
        PHP Support
      • 34
        Java support
      • 28
        File History
      • 21
        Code analysis
      • 18
        MySQL support
      • 14
        Free
      • 14
        Open source
      • 10
        Code completion
      • 9
        Strong Maven Support
      • 8
        NodeJs support
      • 6
        Webdev king
      • 6
        Easy maven project start
      • 6
        Best
      • 4
        Jira Plugin
      • 4
        Foss
      • 3
        Out of the box integration with maven, git, svn
      • 3
        History of changes, friendly tabs
      • 3
        Mandatory
      • 2
        Intuitive ui
      • 2
        Chrome plugin to live update javascript from browser
      • 2
        Groovy support
      • 2
        Native Nette support
      • 2
        I don't like NetBeans
      • 2
        Smarty support
      • 2
        Visual GUI Builder for Swing / AWT
      • 2
        Custom html tags support
      • 1
        Powerful refactoring
      • 1
        Composer commands inside IDE
      CONS OF NETBEANS IDE
      • 2
        PHP debug doesn't support conditional breakpoints

      related NetBeans IDE posts

      Coda logo

      Coda

      110
      115
      0
      A new type of document that blends the flexibility of documents, the power of spreadsheets, and the utility...
      110
      115
      + 1
      0
      PROS OF CODA
        Be the first to leave a pro
        CONS OF CODA
          Be the first to leave a con

          related Coda posts

          Ghostlab logo

          Ghostlab

          9
          20
          0
          Test any website on various browsers and mobile devices simultaneously
          9
          20
          + 1
          0
          PROS OF GHOSTLAB
            Be the first to leave a pro
            CONS OF GHOSTLAB
              Be the first to leave a con

              related Ghostlab posts

              JavaScript logo

              JavaScript

              352.7K
              268.4K
              8.1K
              Lightweight, interpreted, object-oriented language with first-class functions
              352.7K
              268.4K
              + 1
              8.1K
              PROS OF JAVASCRIPT
              • 1.7K
                Can be used on frontend/backend
              • 1.5K
                It's everywhere
              • 1.2K
                Lots of great frameworks
              • 897
                Fast
              • 745
                Light weight
              • 425
                Flexible
              • 392
                You can't get a device today that doesn't run js
              • 286
                Non-blocking i/o
              • 237
                Ubiquitousness
              • 191
                Expressive
              • 55
                Extended functionality to web pages
              • 49
                Relatively easy language
              • 46
                Executed on the client side
              • 30
                Relatively fast to the end user
              • 25
                Pure Javascript
              • 21
                Functional programming
              • 15
                Async
              • 13
                Full-stack
              • 12
                Setup is easy
              • 12
                Future Language of The Web
              • 12
                Its everywhere
              • 11
                Because I love functions
              • 11
                JavaScript is the New PHP
              • 10
                Like it or not, JS is part of the web standard
              • 9
                Expansive community
              • 9
                Everyone use it
              • 9
                Can be used in backend, frontend and DB
              • 9
                Easy
              • 8
                Most Popular Language in the World
              • 8
                Powerful
              • 8
                Can be used both as frontend and backend as well
              • 8
                For the good parts
              • 8
                No need to use PHP
              • 8
                Easy to hire developers
              • 7
                Agile, packages simple to use
              • 7
                Love-hate relationship
              • 7
                Photoshop has 3 JS runtimes built in
              • 7
                Evolution of C
              • 7
                It's fun
              • 7
                Hard not to use
              • 7
                Versitile
              • 7
                Its fun and fast
              • 7
                Nice
              • 7
                Popularized Class-Less Architecture & Lambdas
              • 7
                Supports lambdas and closures
              • 6
                It let's me use Babel & Typescript
              • 6
                Can be used on frontend/backend/Mobile/create PRO Ui
              • 6
                1.6K Can be used on frontend/backend
              • 6
                Client side JS uses the visitors CPU to save Server Res
              • 6
                Easy to make something
              • 5
                Clojurescript
              • 5
                Promise relationship
              • 5
                Stockholm Syndrome
              • 5
                Function expressions are useful for callbacks
              • 5
                Scope manipulation
              • 5
                Everywhere
              • 5
                Client processing
              • 5
                What to add
              • 4
                Because it is so simple and lightweight
              • 4
                Only Programming language on browser
              • 1
                Test
              • 1
                Hard to learn
              • 1
                Test2
              • 1
                Not the best
              • 1
                Easy to understand
              • 1
                Subskill #4
              • 1
                Easy to learn
              • 0
                Hard 彤
              CONS OF JAVASCRIPT
              • 22
                A constant moving target, too much churn
              • 20
                Horribly inconsistent
              • 15
                Javascript is the New PHP
              • 9
                No ability to monitor memory utilitization
              • 8
                Shows Zero output in case of ANY error
              • 7
                Thinks strange results are better than errors
              • 6
                Can be ugly
              • 3
                No GitHub
              • 2
                Slow

              related JavaScript posts

              Zach Holman

              Oof. I have truly hated JavaScript for a long time. Like, for over twenty years now. Like, since the Clinton administration. It's always been a nightmare to deal with all of the aspects of that silly language.

              But wowza, things have changed. Tooling is just way, way better. I'm primarily web-oriented, and using React and Apollo together the past few years really opened my eyes to building rich apps. And I deeply apologize for using the phrase rich apps; I don't think I've ever said such Enterprisey words before.

              But yeah, things are different now. I still love Rails, and still use it for a lot of apps I build. But it's that silly rich apps phrase that's the problem. Users have way more comprehensive expectations than they did even five years ago, and the JS community does a good job at building tools and tech that tackle the problems of making heavy, complicated UI and frontend work.

              Obviously there's a lot of things happening here, so just saying "JavaScript isn't terrible" might encompass a huge amount of libraries and frameworks. But if you're like me, yeah, give things another shot- I'm somehow not hating on JavaScript anymore and... gulp... I kinda love it.

              See more
              Conor Myhrvold
              Tech Brand Mgr, Office of CTO at Uber · | 44 upvotes · 10.9M views

              How Uber developed the open source, end-to-end distributed tracing Jaeger , now a CNCF project:

              Distributed tracing is quickly becoming a must-have component in the tools that organizations use to monitor their complex, microservice-based architectures. At Uber, our open source distributed tracing system Jaeger saw large-scale internal adoption throughout 2016, integrated into hundreds of microservices and now recording thousands of traces every second.

              Here is the story of how we got here, from investigating off-the-shelf solutions like Zipkin, to why we switched from pull to push architecture, and how distributed tracing will continue to evolve:

              https://eng.uber.com/distributed-tracing/

              (GitHub Pages : https://www.jaegertracing.io/, GitHub: https://github.com/jaegertracing/jaeger)

              Bindings/Operator: Python Java Node.js Go C++ Kubernetes JavaScript OpenShift C# Apache Spark

              See more