Alternatives to GitHub logo

Alternatives to GitHub

GitLab, Bitbucket, AWS CodeCommit, Git, and SVN (Subversion) are the most popular alternatives and competitors to GitHub.
189K
155.5K
+ 1
10.2K

What is GitHub and what are its top alternatives?

GitHub is the best place to share code with friends, co-workers, classmates, and complete strangers. Over three million people use GitHub to build amazing things together.
GitHub is a tool in the Code Collaboration & Version Control category of a tech stack.

Top Alternatives to GitHub

  • GitLab

    GitLab

    GitLab offers git repository management, code reviews, issue tracking, activity feeds and wikis. Enterprises install GitLab on-premise and connect it with LDAP and Active Directory servers for secure authentication and authorization. A single GitLab server can handle more than 25,000 users but it is also possible to create a high availability setup with multiple active servers. ...

  • Bitbucket

    Bitbucket

    Bitbucket gives teams one place to plan projects, collaborate on code, test and deploy, all with free private Git repositories. Teams choose Bitbucket because it has a superior Jira integration, built-in CI/CD, & is free for up to 5 users. ...

  • AWS CodeCommit

    AWS CodeCommit

    CodeCommit eliminates the need to operate your own source control system or worry about scaling its infrastructure. You can use CodeCommit to securely store anything from source code to binaries, and it works seamlessly with your existing Git tools. ...

  • Git

    Git

    Git is a free and open source distributed version control system designed to handle everything from small to very large projects with speed and efficiency. ...

  • SVN (Subversion)

    SVN (Subversion)

    Subversion exists to be universally recognized and adopted as an open-source, centralized version control system characterized by its reliability as a safe haven for valuable data; the simplicity of its model and usage; and its ability to support the needs of a wide variety of users and projects, from individuals to large-scale enterprise operations. ...

  • Azure DevOps

    Azure DevOps

    Azure DevOps provides unlimited private Git hosting, cloud build for continuous integration, agile planning, and release management for continuous delivery to the cloud and on-premises. Includes broad IDE support. ...

  • Jira

    Jira

    Jira's secret sauce is the way it simplifies the complexities of software development into manageable units of work. Jira comes out-of-the-box with everything agile teams need to ship value to customers faster. ...

  • Git Flow

    Git Flow

    It provides excellent command line help and output. It is a merge based solution. It doesn't rebase feature branches. ...

GitHub alternatives & related posts

GitLab logo

GitLab

42.6K
34.9K
2.3K
Open source self-hosted Git management software
42.6K
34.9K
+ 1
2.3K
PROS OF GITLAB
  • 491
    Self hosted
  • 420
    Free
  • 334
    Has community edition
  • 238
    Easy setup
  • 238
    Familiar interface
  • 131
    Includes many features, including ci
  • 107
    Nice UI
  • 81
    Good integration with gitlabci
  • 53
    Simple setup
  • 33
    Has an official mobile app
  • 31
    Free private repository
  • 26
    Continuous Integration
  • 19
    Open source, great ui (like github)
  • 15
    Slack Integration
  • 11
    Full CI flow
  • 9
    Free and unlimited private git repos
  • 8
    User, group, and project access management is simple
  • 7
    Built-in CI
  • 7
    All in one (Git, CI, Agile..)
  • 7
    Intuitive UI
  • 4
    Both public and private Repositories
  • 3
    Mattermost Chat client
  • 3
    Issue system
  • 3
    Integrated Docker Registry
  • 2
    I like the its runners and executors feature
  • 2
    Unlimited free repos & collaborators
  • 2
    One-click install through DigitalOcean
  • 2
    It's powerful source code management tool
  • 2
    CI
  • 2
    Free private repos
  • 2
    Excellent
  • 2
    Build/pipeline definition alongside code
  • 2
    On-premises
  • 2
    Security and Stable
  • 2
    So easy to use
  • 2
    Great for team collaboration
  • 2
    Low maintenance cost due omnibus-deployment
  • 2
    It's fully integrated
  • 1
    Many private repo
  • 1
    Published IP list for whitelisting (gl-infra#434)
  • 1
    Powerful Continuous Integration System
  • 1
    Kubernetes Integration
  • 1
    Kubernetes integration with GitLab CI
  • 1
    Review Apps feature
  • 1
    Built-in Docker Registry
  • 1
    The dashboard with deployed environments
  • 1
    Multilingual interface
  • 1
    Native CI
  • 1
    HipChat intergration
  • 1
    It includes everything I need, all packaged with docker
  • 1
    Powerful software planning and maintaining tools
  • 1
    Groups of groups
  • 1
    Dockerized
  • 1
    Beautiful
  • 1
    Wounderful
  • 1
    Opensource
  • 1
    Because is the best remote host for git repositories
  • 1
    Not Microsoft Owned
  • 1
    Full DevOps suite with Git
  • 0
    Supports Radius/Ldap & Browser Code Edits
CONS OF GITLAB
  • 27
    Slow ui performance
  • 7
    Introduce breaking bugs every release
  • 5
    Insecure (no published IP list for whitelisting)
  • 1
    Built-in Docker Registry
  • 0
    Review Apps feature

related GitLab posts

Tim Abbott
Shared insights
on
GitHubGitHubGitLabGitLab
at

I have mixed feelings on GitHub as a product and our use of it for the Zulip open source project. On the one hand, I do feel that being on GitHub helps people discover Zulip, because we have enough stars (etc.) that we rank highly among projects on the platform. and there is a definite benefit for lowering barriers to contribution (which is important to us) that GitHub has such a dominant position in terms of what everyone has accounts with.

But even ignoring how one might feel about their new corporate owner (MicroSoft), in a lot of ways GitHub is a bad product for open source projects. Years after the "Dear GitHub" letter, there are still basic gaps in its issue tracker:

  • You can't give someone permission to label/categorize issues without full write access to a project (including ability to merge things to master, post releases, etc.).
  • You can't let anyone with a GitHub account self-assign issues to themselves.
  • Many more similar issues.

It's embarrassing, because I've talked to GitHub product managers at various open source events about these things for 3 years, and they always agree the thing is important, but then nothing ever improves in the Issues product. Maybe the new management at MicroSoft will fix their product management situation, but if not, I imagine we'll eventually do the migration to GitLab.

We have a custom bot project, http://github.com/zulip/zulipbot, to deal with some of these issues where possible, and every other large project we talk to does the same thing, more or less.

See more
Joshua Dean Küpper
CEO at Scrayos UG (haftungsbeschränkt) · | 18 upvotes · 290.3K views

We use GitLab CI because of the great native integration as a part of the GitLab framework and the linting-capabilities it offers. The visualization of complex pipelines and the embedding within the project overview made Gitlab CI even more convenient. We use it for all projects, all deployments and as a part of GitLab Pages.

While we initially used the Shell-executor, we quickly switched to the Docker-executor and use it exclusively now.

We formerly used Jenkins but preferred to handle everything within GitLab . Aside from the unification of our infrastructure another motivation was the "configuration-in-file"-approach, that Gitlab CI offered, while Jenkins support of this concept was very limited and users had to resort to using the webinterface. Since the file is included within the repository, it is also version controlled, which was a huge plus for us.

See more
Bitbucket logo

Bitbucket

31.8K
24.8K
2.8K
One place to plan projects, collaborate on code, test and deploy, all with free private repositories
31.8K
24.8K
+ 1
2.8K
PROS OF BITBUCKET
  • 905
    Free private repos
  • 398
    Simple setup
  • 347
    Nice ui and tools
  • 341
    Unlimited private repositories
  • 240
    Affordable git hosting
  • 123
    Integrates with many apis and services
  • 119
    Reliable uptime
  • 86
    Nice gui
  • 84
    Pull requests and code reviews
  • 58
    Very customisable
  • 16
    Mercurial repositories
  • 14
    SourceTree integration
  • 11
    JIRA integration
  • 10
    Track every commit to an issue in JIRA
  • 8
    Best free alternative to Github
  • 8
    Deployment hooks
  • 7
    Automatically share repositories with all your teammates
  • 7
    Compatible with Mac and Windows
  • 6
    Source Code Insight
  • 5
    Price
  • 5
    Login with Google
  • 5
    Create a wiki
  • 5
    Approve pull request button
  • 4
    Customizable pipelines
  • 4
    #2 Atlassian Product after JIRA
  • 3
    Continuous Integration and Delivery
  • 3
    Unlimited Private Repos at no cost
  • 3
    Also supports Mercurial
  • 2
    Teamcity
  • 2
    Mercurial Support
  • 2
    IAM
  • 2
    Issues tracker
  • 2
    Open source friendly
  • 2
    Multilingual interface
  • 2
    Academic license program
  • 2
    IAM integration
  • 0
    Free Private Repositories
CONS OF BITBUCKET
  • 19
    Not much community activity
  • 17
    Difficult to review prs because of confusing ui
  • 14
    Quite buggy
  • 10
    Managed by enterprise Java company
  • 8
    CI tool is not free of charge
  • 7
    Complexity with rights management
  • 6
    Only 5 collaborators for private repos
  • 4
    Slow performance
  • 2
    No AWS Codepipelines integration
  • 1
    No more Mercurial repositories
  • 1
    No server side git-hook support

related Bitbucket posts

Michael Kelly
Senior Software Engineer at StackShare · | 14 upvotes · 628.9K views

I use GitLab when building side-projects and MVPs. The interface and interactions are close enough to those of GitHub to prevent cognitive switching costs between professional and personal projects hosted on different services.

GitLab also provides a suite of tools including issue/project management, CI/CD with GitLab CI, and validation/landing pages with GitLab Pages. With everything in one place, on an #OpenSourceCloud GitLab makes it easy for me to manage much larger projects on my own, than would be possible with other solutions or tools.

It's petty I know, but I can also read the GitLab code diffs far more easily than diffs on GitHub or Bitbucket...they just look better in my opinion.

See more
Shared insights
on
GitHubGitHubGitLabGitLabBitbucketBitbucket

A bit difference in GitHub and GitLab though both are Version Control repository management services which provides key component in the software development workflow. A decision of choosing GitHub over GitLab is major leap extension from code management, to deployment and monitoring alongside looking beyond the code base hosting provided best fitted tools for developer communities.

  • Authentication stages - With GitLab you can set and modify people’s permissions according to their role. In GitHub, you can decide if someone gets a read or write access to a repository.
  • Built-In Continuous Integrations - GitLab offers its very own CI for free. No need to use an external CI service. And if you are already used to an external CI, you can obviously integrate with Jenkins, etc whereas GitHub offers various 3rd party integrations – such as Travis CI, CircleCI or Codeship – for running and testing your code. However, there’s no built-in CI solution at the moment.
  • Import/Export Resources - GitLab offers detailed documentation on how to import your data from other vendors – such as GitHub, Bitbucket to GitLab. GitHub, on the other hand, does not offer such detailed documentation for the most common git repositories. However, GitHub offers to use GitHub Importer if you have your source code in Subversion, Mercurial, TFS and others.

Also when it comes to exporting data, GitLab seems to do a pretty solid job, offering you the ability to export your projects including the following data:

  • Wiki and project repositories
  • Project uploads
  • The configuration including webhooks and services
  • Issues with comments, merge requests with diffs and comments, labels, milestones, snippets, and other project entities.

GitHub, on the other hand, seems to be more restrictive when it comes to export features of existing GitHub repositories. * Integrations - #githubmarketplace gives you an essence to have multiple and competitive integrations whereas you will find less in the GitLab.

So go ahead with better understanding.

See more
AWS CodeCommit logo

AWS CodeCommit

294
661
188
Fully-managed source control service that makes it easy for companies to host secure and highly scalable private Git...
294
661
+ 1
188
PROS OF AWS CODECOMMIT
  • 43
    Free private repos
  • 26
    IAM integration
  • 23
    Pay-As-You-Go Pricing
  • 19
    Amazon feels the most Secure
  • 18
    Repo data encrypted at rest
  • 11
    I can make repository by myself if I have AWS account
  • 11
    Faster deployments when using other AWS services
  • 7
    AWS CodePipeline integration
  • 6
    Codebuild integration
  • 6
    Does not support web hooks yet! :(
  • 4
    Cost Effective
  • 2
    No Git LFS! Dealbreaker for me
  • 2
    Elastic Beanstalk Integration
  • 2
    Integrated with AWS Ecosystem
  • 1
    Only US Region
  • 1
    Issue tracker
  • 1
    Open source friendly
  • 1
    Available in Ireland (Dublin) region
  • 1
    CodeDeploy Integration
  • 1
    CodeCommit Trigger for an AWS Lambda Function
  • 1
    Integration via SQS/SNS for events (replaces webhooks)
  • 1
    IAM
  • 0
    Ui
CONS OF AWS CODECOMMIT
  • 11
    UI sucks
  • 4
    SLOW
  • 3
    No Issue Tracker
  • 2
    Bad diffing/no blame
  • 2
    No fork
  • 2
    No webhooks
  • 2
    NO LFS support
  • 1
    Can't download file from UI
  • 1
    Only time based triggers
  • 0
    Accident-prone UI

related AWS CodeCommit posts

Hi, I need advice. In my project, we are using Bitbucket hosted on-prem, Jenkins, and Jira. Also, we have restrictions not to use any plugins for code review, code quality, code security, etc., with bitbucket. Now we want to migrate to AWS CodeCommit, which would mean that we can use, let's say, Amazon CodeGuru for code reviews and move to AWS CodeBuild and AWS CodePipeline for build automation in the future rather than using Jenkins.

Now I want advice on below.

  1. Is it a good idea to migrate from Bitbucket to AWS Codecommit?
  2. If we want to integrate Jira with AWS Codecommit, then how can we do this? If a developer makes any changes in Jira, then a build should be triggered automatically in AWS and create a Jira ticket if the build fails. So, how can we achieve this?
See more

Mojolicious Perl Redmine Redis AWS CodeCommit Amazon SES PostgreSQL Postman Docker jQuery VirtualBox Sublime Text GitHub Git GitLab CI @DBIx::Class @metacpan @TheBat

See more
Git logo

Git

137.6K
113K
6.6K
Fast, scalable, distributed revision control system
137.6K
113K
+ 1
6.6K
PROS OF GIT
  • 1.4K
    Distributed version control system
  • 1.1K
    Efficient branching and merging
  • 964
    Fast
  • 846
    Open source
  • 728
    Better than svn
  • 368
    Great command-line application
  • 306
    Simple
  • 291
    Free
  • 232
    Easy to use
  • 222
    Does not require server
  • 27
    Distributed
  • 22
    Small & Fast
  • 18
    Feature based workflow
  • 15
    Staging Area
  • 13
    Most wide-spread VSC
  • 11
    Disposable Experimentation
  • 11
    Role-based codelines
  • 7
    Frictionless Context Switching
  • 6
    Data Assurance
  • 5
    Efficient
  • 4
    Just awesome
  • 3
    Github integration
  • 3
    Easy branching and merging
  • 2
    Compatible
  • 2
    Possible to lose history and commits
  • 2
    Flexible
  • 1
    Team Integration
  • 1
    Easy
  • 1
    Light
  • 1
    Fast, scalable, distributed revision control system
  • 1
    Rebase supported natively; reflog; access to plumbing
  • 1
    Flexible, easy, Safe, and fast
  • 1
    CLI is great, but the GUI tools are awesome
  • 1
    It's what you do
  • 0
    Phinx
CONS OF GIT
  • 16
    Hard to learn
  • 11
    Inconsistent command line interface
  • 9
    Easy to lose uncommitted work
  • 7
    Worst documentation ever possibly made
  • 5
    Awful merge handling
  • 3
    Unexistent preventive security flows
  • 3
    Rebase hell
  • 2
    When --force is disabled, cannot rebase
  • 2
    Ironically even die-hard supporters screw up badly

related Git posts

Simon Reymann
Senior Fullstack Developer at QUANTUSflow Software GmbH · | 28 upvotes · 3.3M views

Our whole DevOps stack consists of the following tools:

  • GitHub (incl. GitHub Pages/Markdown for Documentation, GettingStarted and HowTo's) for collaborative review and code management tool
  • Respectively Git as revision control system
  • SourceTree as Git GUI
  • Visual Studio Code as IDE
  • CircleCI for continuous integration (automatize development process)
  • Prettier / TSLint / ESLint as code linter
  • SonarQube as quality gate
  • Docker as container management (incl. Docker Compose for multi-container application management)
  • VirtualBox for operating system simulation tests
  • Kubernetes as cluster management for docker containers
  • Heroku for deploying in test environments
  • nginx as web server (preferably used as facade server in production environment)
  • SSLMate (using OpenSSL) for certificate management
  • Amazon EC2 (incl. Amazon S3) for deploying in stage (production-like) and production environments
  • PostgreSQL as preferred database system
  • Redis as preferred in-memory database/store (great for caching)

The main reason we have chosen Kubernetes over Docker Swarm is related to the following artifacts:

  • Key features: Easy and flexible installation, Clear dashboard, Great scaling operations, Monitoring is an integral part, Great load balancing concepts, Monitors the condition and ensures compensation in the event of failure.
  • Applications: An application can be deployed using a combination of pods, deployments, and services (or micro-services).
  • Functionality: Kubernetes as a complex installation and setup process, but it not as limited as Docker Swarm.
  • Monitoring: It supports multiple versions of logging and monitoring when the services are deployed within the cluster (Elasticsearch/Kibana (ELK), Heapster/Grafana, Sysdig cloud integration).
  • Scalability: All-in-one framework for distributed systems.
  • Other Benefits: Kubernetes is backed by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), huge community among container orchestration tools, it is an open source and modular tool that works with any OS.
See more
Ali Soueidan
Creative Web Developer at Ali Soueidan · | 18 upvotes · 805.3K views

Application and Data: Since my personal website ( https://alisoueidan.com ) is a SPA I've chosen to use Vue.js, as a framework to create it. After a short skeptical phase I immediately felt in love with the single file component concept! I also used vuex for state management, which makes working with several components, which are communicating with each other even more fun and convenient to use. Of course, using Vue requires using JavaScript as well, since it is the basis of it.

For markup and style, I used Pug and Sass, since they’re the perfect match to me. I love the clean and strict syntax of both of them and even more that their structure is almost similar. Also, both of them come with an expanded functionality such as mixins, loops and so on related to their “siblings” (HTML and CSS). Both of them require nesting and prevent untidy code, which can be a huge advantage when working in teams. I used JSON to store data (since the data quantity on my website is moderate) – JSON works also good in combo with Pug, using for loops, based on the JSON Objects for example.

To send my contact form I used PHP, since sending emails using PHP is still relatively convenient, simple and easy done.

DevOps: Of course, I used Git to do my version management (which I even do in smaller projects like my website just have an additional backup of my code). On top of that I used GitHub since it now supports private repository for free accounts (which I am using for my own). I use Babel to use ES6 functionality such as arrow functions and so on, and still don’t losing cross browser compatibility.

Side note: I used npm for package management. 🎉

*Business Tools: * I use Asana to organize my project. This is a big advantage to me, even if I work alone, since “private” projects can get interrupted for some time. By using Asana I still know (even after month of not touching a project) what I’ve done, on which task I was at last working on and what still is to do. Working in Teams (for enterprise I’d take on Jira instead) of course Asana is a Tool which I really love to use as well. All the graphics on my website are SVG which I have created with Adobe Illustrator and adjusted within the SVG code or by using JavaScript or CSS (SASS).

See more
SVN (Subversion) logo

SVN (Subversion)

723
542
41
Enterprise-class centralized version control for the masses
723
542
+ 1
41
PROS OF SVN (SUBVERSION)
  • 19
    Easy to use
  • 13
    Simple code versioning
  • 4
    User/Access Management
  • 3
    Complicated code versionioning by Subversion
  • 2
    Free
CONS OF SVN (SUBVERSION)
  • 5
    Branching and tagging use tons of disk space

related SVN (Subversion) posts

I use Visual Studio Code because at this time is a mature software and I can do practically everything using it.

  • It's free and open source: The project is hosted on GitHub and it’s free to download, fork, modify and contribute to the project.

  • Multi-platform: You can download binaries for different platforms, included Windows (x64), MacOS and Linux (.rpm and .deb packages)

  • LightWeight: It runs smoothly in different devices. It has an average memory and CPU usage. Starts almost immediately and it’s very stable.

  • Extended language support: Supports by default the majority of the most used languages and syntax like JavaScript, HTML, C#, Swift, Java, PHP, Python and others. Also, VS Code supports different file types associated to projects like .ini, .properties, XML and JSON files.

  • Integrated tools: Includes an integrated terminal, debugger, problem list and console output inspector. The project navigator sidebar is simple and powerful: you can manage your files and folders with ease. The command palette helps you find commands by text. The search widget has a powerful auto-complete feature to search and find your files.

  • Extensible and configurable: There are many extensions available for every language supported, including syntax highlighters, IntelliSense and code completion, and debuggers. There are also extension to manage application configuration and architecture like Docker and Jenkins.

  • Integrated with Git: You can visually manage your project repositories, pull, commit and push your changes, and easy conflict resolution.( there is support for SVN (Subversion) users by plugin)

See more
rishig
Head of Product at Zulip · | 8 upvotes · 101.6K views
Shared insights
on
GitGitSVN (Subversion)SVN (Subversion)
at

I use Git instead of SVN (Subversion) because it allows us to scale our development team. At any given time, the Zulip open source project has hundreds of open pull requests from tens of contributors, each in various stages of the pipeline. Git's workflow makes it very easy to context switch between different feature branches.

See more
Azure DevOps logo

Azure DevOps

2K
2.1K
232
Services for teams to share code, track work, and ship software
2K
2.1K
+ 1
232
PROS OF AZURE DEVOPS
  • 49
    Complete and powerful
  • 29
    Huge extension ecosystem
  • 26
    Azure integration
  • 25
    Flexible and powerful
  • 25
    One Stop Shop For Build server, Project Mgt, CDCI
  • 15
    Everything I need. Simple and intuitive UI
  • 13
    Support Open Source
  • 8
    Integrations
  • 7
    GitHub Integration
  • 6
    Project Mgmt Features
  • 6
    One 4 all
  • 5
    Crap
  • 5
    Runs in the cloud
  • 5
    Cost free for Stakeholders
  • 3
    Agent On-Premise(Linux - Windows)
  • 2
    Aws integration
  • 2
    Jenkins Integration
  • 1
    GCP Integration
CONS OF AZURE DEVOPS
  • 6
    Still dependant on C# for agents
  • 4
    Capacity across cross functional teams not visibile
  • 4
    Half Baked
  • 3
    Not a requirements management tool
  • 3
    Poor Jenkins integration
  • 3
    Many in devops disregard MS altogether
  • 3
    Jack of all trades, master of none

related Azure DevOps posts

Farzad Jalali
Senior Software Architect at BerryWorld · | 8 upvotes · 185.9K views

Visual Studio Azure DevOps Azure Functions Azure Websites #Azure #AzureKeyVault #AzureAD #AzureApps

#Azure Cloud Since Amazon is potentially our competitor then we need a different cloud vendor, also our programmers are microsoft oriented so the choose were obviously #Azure for us.

Azure DevOps Because we need to be able to develop a neww pipeline into Azure environment ina few minutes.

Azure Kubernetes Service We already in #Azure , also need to use K8s , so let's use AKS as it's a manged Kubernetes in the #Azure

See more
Nicholas Rogoff

Secure Membership Web API backed by SQL Server. This is the backing API to store additional profile and complex membership metadata outside of an Azure AD B2C provider. The front-end using the Azure AD B2C to allow 3rd party trusted identity providers to authenticate. This API provides a way to add and manage more complex permission structures than can easily be maintained in Azure AD.

We have .Net developers and an Azure infrastructure environment using server-less functions, logic apps and SaaS where ever possible. For this service I opted to keep it as a classic WebAPI project and deployed to AppService.

  • Trusted Authentication Provider: @AzureActiveDirectoryB2C
  • Frameworks: .NET Core
  • Language: C# , Microsoft SQL Server , JavaScript
  • IDEs: Visual Studio Code , Visual Studio
  • Libraries: jQuery @EntityFramework, @AutoMapper, @FeatureToggle , @Swashbuckle
  • Database: @SqlAzure
  • Source Control: Git
  • Build and Release Pipelines: Azure DevOps
  • Test tools: Postman , Newman
  • Test framework: @nUnit, @moq
  • Infrastructure: @AzureAppService, @AzureAPIManagement
See more
Jira logo

Jira

43.7K
32.9K
1.2K
The #1 software development tool used by agile teams to plan, track, and release great software.
43.7K
32.9K
+ 1
1.2K
PROS OF JIRA
  • 306
    Powerful
  • 253
    Flexible
  • 148
    Easy separation of projects
  • 113
    Run in the cloud
  • 105
    Code integration
  • 57
    Easy to use
  • 51
    Run on your own
  • 38
    Great customization
  • 38
    Easy Workflow Configuration
  • 26
    REST API
  • 11
    Great Agile Management tool
  • 7
    Integrates with virtually everything
  • 6
    Confluence
  • 3
    Sentry Issues Integration
  • 2
    Complicated
CONS OF JIRA
  • 7
    Rather expensive
  • 4
    Large memory requirement
  • 2
    Slow

related Jira posts

Johnny Bell

So I am a huge fan of JIRA like #massive I used it for many many years, and really loved it, used it personally and at work. I would suggest every new workplace that I worked at to switch to JIRA instead of what I was using.

When I started at #StackShare we were using a Trello #Kanban board and I was so shocked at how easy the workflow was to follow, create new tasks and get tasks QA'd and deployed. What was so great about this was it didn't come with all the complexity of JIRA. Like setting up a project, user rules etc. You are able to hit the ground running with Trello and get tasks started right away without being overwhelmed with the complexity of options in JIRA

With a few TrelloPowerUps we were easily able to add GitHub integration and storyPoints to our cards and thats all we needed to get a really nice agile workflow going.

I'm not saying that JIRA is not useful, I can see larger companies being able to use the JIRA features and have the time to go through all the complex setup to get a really good workflow going. But for smaller #Startups that want to hit the ground running Trello for me is the way to go.

In saying that what I would love Trello to implement is to allow me to create custom fields. Right now we just have a Description field. So I am adding User Stories & How To Test in the Markdown of the Description if I could have these as custom fields then my #Agile workflow would be complete.

#StackDecisionsLaunch

See more
Jakub Olan
Node.js Software Engineer · | 17 upvotes · 176.1K views

Last time we shared there information about our decision about using YouTrack over Jira actually we found much better solution that our team have loved. Linear is a minimalistic issue tracker that integrates well with Sentry, GitHub, Slack and Figma which are our basic tools. I would like to recommend checking out Linear as a potential alternative to "heavy" issue trackers, maybe at enterprises that may not work but when we're a startup that works awesome!

See more
Git Flow logo

Git Flow

89
63
0
A set of git extensions to provide high-level repository operations
89
63
+ 1
0
PROS OF GIT FLOW
    Be the first to leave a pro
    CONS OF GIT FLOW
      Be the first to leave a con

      related Git Flow posts