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What is Figma?

Figma is the first interface design tool with real-time collaboration. It keeps everyone on the same page. Focus on the work instead of fighting your tools.
Figma is a tool in the Graphic Design category of a tech stack.

Who uses Figma?

Companies
91 companies reportedly use Figma in their tech stacks, including 9GAG, Avocode, and Startaê.

Developers
150 developers on StackShare have stated that they use Figma.

Figma Integrations

Why developers like Figma?

Here’s a list of reasons why companies and developers use Figma
Figma Reviews

Here are some stack decisions, common use cases and reviews by companies and developers who chose Figma in their tech stack.

Jonathan Pugh
Jonathan Pugh
Software Engineer / Project Manager / Technical Architect · | 15 upvotes · 54.7K views
Pouchdb
CouchDB
Font Awesome
CSS 3
Apache Cordova
PhoneGap
HTML5
Ruby
Babel
Webpack
Visual Studio Code
Figma
TypeScript
JavaScript
Framework7
#GraphCool
#HTML5
#GraphQL
#Sketch
#Template7
#HandleBars
#Electron
#Less
#Sass
#SCSS
#CSS3
#Css

I needed to choose a full stack of tools for cross platform mobile application design & development. After much research and trying different tools, these are what I came up with that work for me today:

For the client coding I chose Framework7 because of its performance, easy learning curve, and very well designed, beautiful UI widgets. I think it's perfect for solo development or small teams. I didn't like React Native. It felt heavy to me and rigid. Framework7 allows the use of #CSS3, which I think is the best technology to come out of the #WWW movement. No other tech has been able to allow designers and developers to develop such flexible, high performance, customisable user interface elements that are highly responsive and hardware accelerated before. Now #CSS3 includes variables and flexboxes it is truly a powerful language and there is no longer a need for preprocessors such as #SCSS / #Sass / #less. React Native contains a very limited interpretation of #CSS3 which I found very frustrating after using #CSS3 for some years already and knowing its powerful features. The other very nice feature of Framework7 is that you can even build for the browser if you want your app to be available for desktop web browsers. The latest release also includes the ability to build for #Electron so you can have MacOS, Windows and Linux desktop apps. This is not possible with React Native yet.

Framework7 runs on top of Apache Cordova. Cordova and webviews have been slated as being slow in the past. Having a game developer background I found the tweeks to make it run as smooth as silk. One of those tweeks is to use WKWebView. Another important one was using srcset on images.

I use #Template7 for the for the templating system which is a no-nonsense mobile-centric #HandleBars style extensible templating system. It's easy to write custom helpers for, is fast and has a small footprint. I'm not forced into a new paradigm or learning some new syntax. It operates with standard JavaScript, HTML5 and CSS 3. It's written by the developer of Framework7 and so dovetails with it as expected.

I configured TypeScript to work with the latest version of Framework7. I consider TypeScript to be one of the best creations to come out of Microsoft in some time. They must have an amazing team working on it. It's very powerful and flexible. It helps you catch a lot of bugs and also provides code completion in supporting IDEs. So for my IDE I use Visual Studio Code which is a blazingly fast and silky smooth editor that integrates seamlessly with TypeScript for the ultimate type checking setup (both products are produced by Microsoft).

I use Webpack and Babel to compile the JavaScript. TypeScript can compile to JavaScript directly but Babel offers a few more options and polyfills so you can use the latest (and even prerelease) JavaScript features today and compile to be backwards compatible with virtually any browser. My favorite recent addition is "optional chaining" which greatly simplifies and increases readability of a number of sections of my code dealing with getting and setting data in nested objects.

I use some Ruby scripts to process images with ImageMagick and pngquant to optimise for size and even auto insert responsive image code into the HTML5. Ruby is the ultimate cross platform scripting language. Even as your scripts become large, Ruby allows you to refactor your code easily and make it Object Oriented if necessary. I find it the quickest and easiest way to maintain certain aspects of my build process.

For the user interface design and prototyping I use Figma. Figma has an almost identical user interface to #Sketch but has the added advantage of being cross platform (MacOS and Windows). Its real-time collaboration features are outstanding and I use them a often as I work mostly on remote projects. Clients can collaborate in real-time and see changes I make as I make them. The clickable prototyping features in Figma are also very well designed and mean I can send clickable prototypes to clients to try user interface updates as they are made and get immediate feedback. I'm currently also evaluating the latest version of #AdobeXD as an alternative to Figma as it has the very cool auto-animate feature. It doesn't have real-time collaboration yet, but I heard it is proposed for 2019.

For the UI icons I use Font Awesome Pro. They have the largest selection and best looking icons you can find on the internet with several variations in styles so you can find most of the icons you want for standard projects.

For the backend I was using the #GraphCool Framework. As I later found out, #GraphQL still has some way to go in order to provide the full power of a mature graph query language so later in my project I ripped out #GraphCool and replaced it with CouchDB and Pouchdb. Primarily so I could provide good offline app support. CouchDB with Pouchdb is very flexible and efficient combination and overcomes some of the restrictions I found in #GraphQL and hence #GraphCool also. The most impressive and important feature of CouchDB is its replication. You can configure it in various ways for backups, fault tolerance, caching or conditional merging of databases. CouchDB and Pouchdb even supports storing, retrieving and serving binary or image data or other mime types. This removes a level of complexity usually present in database implementations where binary or image data is usually referenced through an #HTML5 link. With CouchDB and Pouchdb apps can operate offline and sync later, very efficiently, when the network connection is good.

I use PhoneGap when testing the app. It auto-reloads your app when its code is changed and you can also install it on Android phones to preview your app instantly. iOS is a bit more tricky cause of Apple's policies so it's not available on the App Store, but you can build it and install it yourself to your device.

So that's my latest mobile stack. What tools do you use? Have you tried these ones?

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Adam Neary
Adam Neary
Engineer at Airbnb · | 8 upvotes · 86.1K views
atAirbnbAirbnb
Apollo
Figma
Zeplin
React Storybook
#StorybookDesignStack
#StorybookStack
#ReactDesignStack

The tool we use for editing UI is React Storybook. It is the perfect place to make sure your work aligns with designs to the pixel across breakpoints. You get fast hot module reloading and a couple checkboxes to enable/disable browser features like Flexbox.

The only tricks I apply to Storybook are loading the stories with the mock data we’ve extracted from the API. If your mock data really covers all the various various possible states for your UI, you are good to go. Beyond that, if you have alternative states you want to account for, perhaps loading or error states, you can add them in manually.

This is the crux of the matter for Storybook. This file is entirely generated from Yeoman (discussed below), and it delivers the examples from the Alps Journey by default. getSectionsFromJourney() just filters the sections.

One other hack you’ll notice is that I added a pair of divs to bookend my component vertically, since Storybook renders with whitespace around the component. That is fine for buttons or UI with borders, but it’s hard to tell precisely where your component starts and ends, so I hacked them in there.

Since we are talking about how all these fabulous tools work so well together to help you be productive, can I just say what a delight it is to work on UI with Zeplin or Figma side by side with Storybook. Digging into UI in this abstract way takes all the chaos of this madcap world away one breakpoint at a time, and in that quiet realm, you are good down to the pixel every time.

To supply Storybook and our unit tests with realistic mock data, we want to extract the mock data directly from our Shared Development Environment. As with codegen, even a small change in a query fragment should also trigger many small changes in mock data. And here, similarly, the hard part is tackled entirely by Apollo CLI, and you can stitch it together with your own code in no time.

Coming back to Zeplin and Figma briefly, they're both built to allow engineers to extract content directly to facilitate product development.

Extracting the copy for an entire paragraph is as simple as selecting the content in Zeplin and clicking the “copy” icon in the Content section of the sidebar. In the case of Zeplin, images can be extracted by selecting and clicking the “download” icon in the Assets section of the sidebar.

ReactDesignStack #StorybookStack #StorybookDesignStack
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ElizavettaKudelya
ElizavettaKudelya
marketer at Evergreen · | 1 upvotes · 1.4K views
atEvergreenEvergreen
Figma

We use Figma because it unites prototyping and design tools. With Figma's components approach it can be also used as an asset management tool, so we share with a front-end development, not an image, but a UI kit split into components. It saves time on doing CSS and components stucture

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Z Kubota
Z Kubota
Web Developer Intern at Sultan Ventures · | 1 upvotes · 1.4K views
Figma
#Photoshop
#Sketch
#Wireframing

Figma was our intern team's #wireframing tool of choice. No one had experience with #Sketch , and everyone except 2 students had let their #Photoshop subscriptions lapse. With Figma we could also make a clickable prototype and share our presentations easily.

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Figma's Features

  • Online Sketch alternative
  • Free for small teams
  • Easy to use

Figma Alternatives & Comparisons

What are some alternatives to Figma?
Sketch
Easily create complex shapes with our state-of-the-art vector boolean operations and take advantage of our extensive layer styles.
InVision
InVision lets you create stunningly realistic interactive wireframes and prototypes without compromising your creative vision.
Adobe XD
A vector-based tool developed and published by Adobe Inc for designing and prototyping user experience for web and mobile apps.
Adobe Photoshop
Adobe is changing the world through digital experiences. We help our customers create, deliver and optimize content and applications.
Zeplin
Collaboration app for designers & developers. Supports Sketch and Photoshop (on beta!).
See all alternatives

Figma's Followers
124 developers follow Figma to keep up with related blogs and decisions.
Mohamma76685757
sleepymonday
Georg Ledermann
찬희 이
Kamran Zakir
Eduard Aksamitov
Coty Beasley
Bugra Sakizci
Taylan Kurt
Adam Tolman