Alternatives to Docsify logo

Alternatives to Docsify

Yesware, MkDocs, Gitbook, VuePress, and Docusaurus are the most popular alternatives and competitors to Docsify.
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What is Docsify and what are its top alternatives?

Docsify generates your documentation website on the fly without generating static html files. Instead, it loads and parses your Markdown files and displays them as a website.
Docsify is a tool in the Documentation as a Service & Tools category of a tech stack.
Docsify is an open source tool with 17.7K GitHub stars and 4.3K GitHub forks. Here’s a link to Docsify's open source repository on GitHub

Top Alternatives to Docsify

  • Yesware

    Yesware

    It helps build lasting business relationships, right from your inbox. A sales engagement platform designed for sales professionals and account managers. ...

  • MkDocs

    MkDocs

    It builds completely static HTML sites that you can host on GitHub pages, Amazon S3, or anywhere else you choose. There's a stack of good looking themes available. The built-in dev-server allows you to preview your documentation as you're writing it. It will even auto-reload and refresh your browser whenever you save your changes. ...

  • Gitbook

    Gitbook

    It is a modern documentation platform where teams can document everything from products, to APIs and internal knowledge-bases. It is a place to think and track ideas for you & your team. ...

  • VuePress

    VuePress

    A minimalistic static site generator with a Vue-powered theming system, and a default theme optimized for writing technical documentation. It was created to support the documentation needs of Vue's own sub projects. ...

  • Docusaurus

    Docusaurus

    Docusaurus is a project for easily building, deploying, and maintaining open source project websites. ...

  • Jekyll

    Jekyll

    Think of Jekyll as a file-based CMS, without all the complexity. Jekyll takes your content, renders Markdown and Liquid templates, and spits out a complete, static website ready to be served by Apache, Nginx or another web server. Jekyll is the engine behind GitHub Pages, which you can use to host sites right from your GitHub repositories. ...

  • Sphinx

    Sphinx

    It lets you either batch index and search data stored in an SQL database, NoSQL storage, or just files quickly and easily — or index and search data on the fly, working with it pretty much as with a database server. ...

  • Postman

    Postman

    It is the only complete API development environment, used by nearly five million developers and more than 100,000 companies worldwide. ...

Docsify alternatives & related posts

Yesware logo

Yesware

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7
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Lets you track emails and work more effectively, right from your Gmail or Outlook inbox
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PROS OF YESWARE
    Be the first to leave a pro
    CONS OF YESWARE
      Be the first to leave a con

      related Yesware posts

      MkDocs logo

      MkDocs

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      86
      1
      A static site generator
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      86
      + 1
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      PROS OF MKDOCS
      • 1
        Gitlab integration
      CONS OF MKDOCS
        Be the first to leave a con

        related MkDocs posts

        Nikolaj Ivancic

        I want to build a documentation tool - functionally equivalent to MkDocs. The initial choice ought to be VuePress - but I know of at least one respectable developer who started with VuePress and switched to Nuxt.js. A rich set of "themes" is a plus and all documents ought to be in Markdown.

        Any opinions?

        See more
        Gitbook logo

        Gitbook

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        Document Everything! For you, your users and your team
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        PROS OF GITBOOK
        • 1
          Integrated high-quality editor
        CONS OF GITBOOK
        • 1
          Just sync with GitHub

        related Gitbook posts

        VuePress logo

        VuePress

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        4
        A static-site generator built by the Vue.js team
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        PROS OF VUEPRESS
        • 2
          It's Vue
        • 1
          Built in text search feature
        • 1
          Created by the vue.js developers
        CONS OF VUEPRESS
        • 3
          Its Vue

        related VuePress posts

        Nikolaj Ivancic

        I want to build a documentation tool - functionally equivalent to MkDocs. The initial choice ought to be VuePress - but I know of at least one respectable developer who started with VuePress and switched to Nuxt.js. A rich set of "themes" is a plus and all documents ought to be in Markdown.

        Any opinions?

        See more
        Docusaurus logo

        Docusaurus

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        Easy to maintain open source documentation websites
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        PROS OF DOCUSAURUS
        • 6
          Self Hosted
        • 5
          Open Source
        • 2
          Jamstack
        • 2
          Free to use
        • 2
          MDX
        • 2
          Easy customization
        • 2
          React
        • 1
          I18n
        • 1
          Versioning
        CONS OF DOCUSAURUS
          Be the first to leave a con

          related Docusaurus posts

          Jekyll logo

          Jekyll

          1.3K
          1.2K
          225
          Blog-aware, static site generator in Ruby
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          PROS OF JEKYLL
          • 74
            Github pages integration
          • 54
            Open source
          • 36
            It's slick, customisable and hackerish
          • 23
            Easy to deploy
          • 22
            Straightforward cms for the hacker mindset
          • 6
            Gitlab pages integration
          • 4
            Best for blogging
          • 2
            Easy to integrate localization
          • 2
            Low maintenance
          • 1
            Huge plugins ecosystem
          • 1
            Authoring freedom and simplicity
          CONS OF JEKYLL
          • 4
            Build time increases exponentially as site grows
          • 2
            Lack of developments lately
          • 1
            Dsad
          • 1
            Og doesn't work with postings dynamically

          related Jekyll posts

          Dale Ross
          Independent Contractor at Self Employed · | 22 upvotes · 887.3K views

          I've heard that I have the ability to write well, at times. When it flows, it flows. I decided to start blogging in 2013 on Blogger. I started a company and joined BizPark with the Microsoft Azure allotment. I created a WordPress blog and did a migration at some point. A lot happened in the time after that migration but I stopped coding and changed cities during tumultuous times that taught me many lessons concerning mental health and productivity. I eventually graduated from BizSpark and outgrew the credit allotment. That killed the WordPress blog.

          I blogged about writing again on the existing Blogger blog but it didn't feel right. I looked at a few options where I wouldn't have to worry about hosting cost indefinitely and Jekyll stood out with GitHub Pages. The Importer was fairly straightforward for the existing blog posts.

          Todo * Set up redirects for all posts on blogger. The URI format is different so a complete redirect wouldn't work. Although, there may be something in Jekyll that could manage the redirects. I did notice the old URLs were stored in the front matter. I'm working on a command-line Ruby gem for the current plan. * I did find some of the lost WordPress posts on archive.org that I downloaded with the waybackmachinedownloader. I think I might write an importer for that. * I still have a few Disqus comment threads to map

          See more
          Josh Dzielak
          Co-Founder & CTO at Orbit · | 5 upvotes · 208.6K views
          Shared insights
          on
          Jekyll
          Hugo

          Earlier this year, I migrated my personal website (dzello.com) from Jekyll to Hugo. My goal with the migration was to make the development environment as pleasant as possible and to make it really easy to add new types of content. For example, I knew I wanted to add a consulting page and some portfolio-style pages to show off talks I had given and projects I had worked on.

          I had heard about how fast Hugo was, so I tried it out with my content after using a simple migration tool. The results were impressive - the startup and rebuild times were in milliseconds, making the process of iterating on content or design less cumbersome. Then I started to see how I could use Hugo to create new page types and was very impressed by the flexibility of the content model. It took me a few days to really understand where content should go with Hugo, but then I felt very confident that I could create many different types of pages - even multiple blogs if I wanted - using a consistent syntax and with full control of the layouts and the URLs.

          After about 6 months, I've been very happy with the results of the migration. The dev environment is light and fast and I feel at ease adding new pages and sections to the site.

          See more
          Sphinx logo

          Sphinx

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          Open source full text search server, designed from the ground up with performance, relevance (aka search quality), and...
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          PROS OF SPHINX
          • 15
            Fast
          • 7
            Simple deployment
          • 5
            Open source
          • 0
            Lots of extentions
          CONS OF SPHINX
            Be the first to leave a con

            related Sphinx posts

            Postman logo

            Postman

            55.9K
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            Only complete API development environment
            55.9K
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            PROS OF POSTMAN
            • 481
              Easy to use
            • 366
              Great tool
            • 274
              Makes developing rest api's easy peasy
            • 154
              Easy setup, looks good
            • 142
              The best api workflow out there
            • 53
              History feature
            • 53
              It's the best
            • 43
              Adds real value to my workflow
            • 41
              Great interface that magically predicts your needs
            • 34
              The best in class app
            • 10
              Can save and share script
            • 9
              Fully featured without looking cluttered
            • 7
              Collections
            • 6
              Global/Environment Variables
            • 6
              Shareable Collections
            • 6
              Dead simple and useful. Excellent
            • 6
              Dark theme easy on the eyes
            • 6
              Option to run scrips
            • 5
              Awesome customer support
            • 5
              Great integration with newman
            • 4
              The test script is useful
            • 3
              This has simplified my testing significantly
            • 3
              Easy as pie
            • 3
              Simple
            • 3
              Documentation
            • 3
              Makes testing API's as easy as 1,2,3
            • 3
              Saves responses
            • 2
              API-network
            • 2
              Mocking API calls with predefined response
            • 2
              I'd recommend it to everyone who works with apis
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              Pre-request Script and Test attributes are invaluable
            • 1
              Postman Runner CI Integration
            • 1
              Now supports GraphQL
            • 1
              Continuous integration using newman
            • 1
              Easy to setup, test and provides test storage
            • 1
              Graph
            • 0
              <a href="http://fixbit.com/">useful tool</a>
            • 0
              Runner
            CONS OF POSTMAN
            • 8
              Stores credentials in HTTP
            • 7
              Poor GraphQL support
            • 6
              Bloated features and UI
            • 5
              Cumbersome to switch authentication tokens
            • 1
              Expensive
            • 1
              Can't prompt for per-request variables

            related Postman posts

            Noah Zoschke
            Engineering Manager at Segment · | 30 upvotes · 1.9M views

            We just launched the Segment Config API (try it out for yourself here) — a set of public REST APIs that enable you to manage your Segment configuration. A public API is only as good as its #documentation. For the API reference doc we are using Postman.

            Postman is an “API development environment”. You download the desktop app, and build API requests by URL and payload. Over time you can build up a set of requests and organize them into a “Postman Collection”. You can generalize a collection with “collection variables”. This allows you to parameterize things like username, password and workspace_name so a user can fill their own values in before making an API call. This makes it possible to use Postman for one-off API tasks instead of writing code.

            Then you can add Markdown content to the entire collection, a folder of related methods, and/or every API method to explain how the APIs work. You can publish a collection and easily share it with a URL.

            This turns Postman from a personal #API utility to full-blown public interactive API documentation. The result is a great looking web page with all the API calls, docs and sample requests and responses in one place. Check out the results here.

            Postman’s powers don’t end here. You can automate Postman with “test scripts” and have it periodically run a collection scripts as “monitors”. We now have #QA around all the APIs in public docs to make sure they are always correct

            Along the way we tried other techniques for documenting APIs like ReadMe.io or Swagger UI. These required a lot of effort to customize.

            Writing and maintaining a Postman collection takes some work, but the resulting documentation site, interactivity and API testing tools are well worth it.

            See more
            Simon Reymann
            Senior Fullstack Developer at QUANTUSflow Software GmbH · | 24 upvotes · 1.7M views

            Our whole Node.js backend stack consists of the following tools:

            • Lerna as a tool for multi package and multi repository management
            • npm as package manager
            • NestJS as Node.js framework
            • TypeScript as programming language
            • ExpressJS as web server
            • Swagger UI for visualizing and interacting with the API’s resources
            • Postman as a tool for API development
            • TypeORM as object relational mapping layer
            • JSON Web Token for access token management

            The main reason we have chosen Node.js over PHP is related to the following artifacts:

            • Made for the web and widely in use: Node.js is a software platform for developing server-side network services. Well-known projects that rely on Node.js include the blogging software Ghost, the project management tool Trello and the operating system WebOS. Node.js requires the JavaScript runtime environment V8, which was specially developed by Google for the popular Chrome browser. This guarantees a very resource-saving architecture, which qualifies Node.js especially for the operation of a web server. Ryan Dahl, the developer of Node.js, released the first stable version on May 27, 2009. He developed Node.js out of dissatisfaction with the possibilities that JavaScript offered at the time. The basic functionality of Node.js has been mapped with JavaScript since the first version, which can be expanded with a large number of different modules. The current package managers (npm or Yarn) for Node.js know more than 1,000,000 of these modules.
            • Fast server-side solutions: Node.js adopts the JavaScript "event-loop" to create non-blocking I/O applications that conveniently serve simultaneous events. With the standard available asynchronous processing within JavaScript/TypeScript, highly scalable, server-side solutions can be realized. The efficient use of the CPU and the RAM is maximized and more simultaneous requests can be processed than with conventional multi-thread servers.
            • A language along the entire stack: Widely used frameworks such as React or AngularJS or Vue.js, which we prefer, are written in JavaScript/TypeScript. If Node.js is now used on the server side, you can use all the advantages of a uniform script language throughout the entire application development. The same language in the back- and frontend simplifies the maintenance of the application and also the coordination within the development team.
            • Flexibility: Node.js sets very few strict dependencies, rules and guidelines and thus grants a high degree of flexibility in application development. There are no strict conventions so that the appropriate architecture, design structures, modules and features can be freely selected for the development.
            See more