Alternatives to Review Board logo

Alternatives to Review Board

Crucible, Bitbucket, GitLab, ESLint, and Prettier are the most popular alternatives and competitors to Review Board.
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What is Review Board and what are its top alternatives?

Review Board is an open source, web-based code and document review tool built to help companies, open source projects, and other organizations keep their quality high and their bug count low.
Review Board is a tool in the Code Review category of a tech stack.
Review Board is an open source tool with 1.3K GitHub stars and 392 GitHub forks. Here’s a link to Review Board's open source repository on GitHub

Top Alternatives to Review Board

  • Crucible

    Crucible

    It is a Web-based application primarily aimed at enterprise, and certain features that enable peer review of a code base may be considered enterprise social software. ...

  • Bitbucket

    Bitbucket

    Bitbucket gives teams one place to plan projects, collaborate on code, test and deploy, all with free private Git repositories. Teams choose Bitbucket because it has a superior Jira integration, built-in CI/CD, & is free for up to 5 users. ...

  • GitLab

    GitLab

    GitLab offers git repository management, code reviews, issue tracking, activity feeds and wikis. Enterprises install GitLab on-premise and connect it with LDAP and Active Directory servers for secure authentication and authorization. A single GitLab server can handle more than 25,000 users but it is also possible to create a high availability setup with multiple active servers. ...

  • ESLint

    ESLint

    A pluggable and configurable linter tool for identifying and reporting on patterns in JavaScript. Maintain your code quality with ease. ...

  • Prettier

    Prettier

    Prettier is an opinionated code formatter. It enforces a consistent style by parsing your code and re-printing it with its own rules that take the maximum line length into account, wrapping code when necessary. ...

  • SonarQube

    SonarQube

    SonarQube provides an overview of the overall health of your source code and even more importantly, it highlights issues found on new code. With a Quality Gate set on your project, you will simply fix the Leak and start mechanically improving. ...

  • Snyk

    Snyk

    Automatically find & fix vulnerabilities in your code, containers, Kubernetes, and Terraform ...

  • Code Climate

    Code Climate

    After each Git push, Code Climate analyzes your code for complexity, duplication, and common smells to determine changes in quality and surface technical debt hotspots. ...

Review Board alternatives & related posts

Crucible logo

Crucible

53
87
12
Review code, discuss changes, share knowledge, and identify defects
53
87
+ 1
12
PROS OF CRUCIBLE
  • 5
    JIRA Integration
  • 4
    Post-commit preview
  • 2
    Has a linux version
  • 1
    Pre-commit preview
CONS OF CRUCIBLE
    Be the first to leave a con

    related Crucible posts

    Eric Seibert
    DevOps at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia · | 6 upvotes · 46.7K views

    We are using a Bitbucket server, and due to migration efforts and new Atlassian community license changes, we need to move to a new self-hosted solution. The new data-center license for Atlassian, available in February, will be community provisioned (free). Along with that community license, other technologies will be coming with it (Crucible, Confluence, and Jira). Is there value in a paid-for license to get the GitHub Enterprise? Are the tools that come with it worth the cost?

    I know it is about $20 per 10 seats, and we have about 300 users. Have other convertees to Microsoft's tools found it easy to do a migration? Is the toolset that much more beneficial to the free suite that one can get from Atlassian?

    So far, free seems to be the winner, and the familiarization with Atlassian implementation and maintenance is understood. Going to GitHub, are there any distinct challenges to be found or any perks to be attained?

    See more
    Bitbucket logo

    Bitbucket

    29K
    22.2K
    2.8K
    One place to plan projects, collaborate on code, test and deploy, all with free private repositories
    29K
    22.2K
    + 1
    2.8K
    PROS OF BITBUCKET
    • 904
      Free private repos
    • 397
      Simple setup
    • 345
      Nice ui and tools
    • 340
      Unlimited private repositories
    • 239
      Affordable git hosting
    • 122
      Integrates with many apis and services
    • 118
      Reliable uptime
    • 85
      Nice gui
    • 83
      Pull requests and code reviews
    • 57
      Very customisable
    • 15
      Mercurial repositories
    • 13
      SourceTree integration
    • 10
      JIRA integration
    • 9
      Track every commit to an issue in JIRA
    • 7
      Best free alternative to Github
    • 7
      Automatically share repositories with all your teammates
    • 7
      Deployment hooks
    • 6
      Compatible with Mac and Windows
    • 5
      Source Code Insight
    • 4
      Price
    • 4
      Login with Google
    • 4
      Create a wiki
    • 4
      Approve pull request button
    • 3
      #2 Atlassian Product after JIRA
    • 3
      Customizable pipelines
    • 2
      Also supports Mercurial
    • 2
      Unlimited Private Repos at no cost
    • 2
      Continuous Integration and Delivery
    • 1
      Mercurial Support
    • 1
      IAM
    • 1
      Issues tracker
    • 1
      Open source friendly
    • 1
      Teamcity
    • 1
      Multilingual interface
    • 1
      Academic license program
    • 1
      IAM integration
    • 0
      Free Private Repositories
    CONS OF BITBUCKET
    • 19
      Not much community activity
    • 17
      Difficult to review prs because of confusing ui
    • 14
      Quite buggy
    • 10
      Managed by enterprise Java company
    • 8
      CI tool is not free of charge
    • 7
      Complexity with rights management
    • 6
      Only 5 collaborators for private repos
    • 4
      Slow performance
    • 2
      No AWS Codepipelines integration
    • 1
      No more Mercurial repositories
    • 1
      No server side git-hook support

    related Bitbucket posts

    Michael Kelly
    Senior Software Engineer at StackShare · | 14 upvotes · 578K views

    I use GitLab when building side-projects and MVPs. The interface and interactions are close enough to those of GitHub to prevent cognitive switching costs between professional and personal projects hosted on different services.

    GitLab also provides a suite of tools including issue/project management, CI/CD with GitLab CI, and validation/landing pages with GitLab Pages. With everything in one place, on an #OpenSourceCloud GitLab makes it easy for me to manage much larger projects on my own, than would be possible with other solutions or tools.

    It's petty I know, but I can also read the GitLab code diffs far more easily than diffs on GitHub or Bitbucket...they just look better in my opinion.

    See more
    Shared insights
    on
    GitHub
    GitLab
    Bitbucket

    A bit difference in GitHub and GitLab though both are Version Control repository management services which provides key component in the software development workflow. A decision of choosing GitHub over GitLab is major leap extension from code management, to deployment and monitoring alongside looking beyond the code base hosting provided best fitted tools for developer communities.

    • Authentication stages - With GitLab you can set and modify people’s permissions according to their role. In GitHub, you can decide if someone gets a read or write access to a repository.
    • Built-In Continuous Integrations - GitLab offers its very own CI for free. No need to use an external CI service. And if you are already used to an external CI, you can obviously integrate with Jenkins, etc whereas GitHub offers various 3rd party integrations – such as Travis CI, CircleCI or Codeship – for running and testing your code. However, there’s no built-in CI solution at the moment.
    • Import/Export Resources - GitLab offers detailed documentation on how to import your data from other vendors – such as GitHub, Bitbucket to GitLab. GitHub, on the other hand, does not offer such detailed documentation for the most common git repositories. However, GitHub offers to use GitHub Importer if you have your source code in Subversion, Mercurial, TFS and others.

    Also when it comes to exporting data, GitLab seems to do a pretty solid job, offering you the ability to export your projects including the following data:

    • Wiki and project repositories
    • Project uploads
    • The configuration including webhooks and services
    • Issues with comments, merge requests with diffs and comments, labels, milestones, snippets, and other project entities.

    GitHub, on the other hand, seems to be more restrictive when it comes to export features of existing GitHub repositories. * Integrations - #githubmarketplace gives you an essence to have multiple and competitive integrations whereas you will find less in the GitLab.

    So go ahead with better understanding.

    See more
    GitLab logo

    GitLab

    36.8K
    29.5K
    2.3K
    Open source self-hosted Git management software
    36.8K
    29.5K
    + 1
    2.3K
    PROS OF GITLAB
    • 487
      Self hosted
    • 416
      Free
    • 331
      Has community edition
    • 234
      Easy setup
    • 234
      Familiar interface
    • 129
      Includes many features, including ci
    • 105
      Nice UI
    • 79
      Good integration with gitlabci
    • 52
      Simple setup
    • 32
      Has an official mobile app
    • 30
      Free private repository
    • 24
      Continuous Integration
    • 16
      Open source, great ui (like github)
    • 14
      Slack Integration
    • 9
      Full CI flow
    • 8
      Free and unlimited private git repos
    • 8
      User, group, and project access management is simple
    • 7
      Intuitive UI
    • 7
      All in one (Git, CI, Agile..)
    • 6
      Built-in CI
    • 4
      Both public and private Repositories
    • 3
      Mattermost Chat client
    • 3
      Integrated Docker Registry
    • 2
      It's fully integrated
    • 2
      Unlimited free repos & collaborators
    • 2
      I like the its runners and executors feature
    • 2
      CI
    • 2
      So easy to use
    • 2
      One-click install through DigitalOcean
    • 2
      It's powerful source code management tool
    • 2
      Excellent
    • 2
      Build/pipeline definition alongside code
    • 2
      Security and Stable
    • 2
      Issue system
    • 2
      Free private repos
    • 2
      Low maintenance cost due omnibus-deployment
    • 2
      On-premises
    • 1
      Powerful Continuous Integration System
    • 1
      Powerful software planning and maintaining tools
    • 1
      Groups of groups
    • 1
      Kubernetes integration with GitLab CI
    • 1
      Review Apps feature
    • 1
      Built-in Docker Registry
    • 1
      Dockerized
    • 1
      Beautiful
    • 1
      Wounderful
    • 1
      Opensource
    • 1
      Because is the best remote host for git repositories
    • 1
      Not Microsoft Owned
    • 1
      Full DevOps suite with Git
    • 1
      Many private repo
    • 1
      Native CI
    • 1
      HipChat intergration
    • 1
      Kubernetes Integration
    • 1
      Published IP list for whitelisting (gl-infra#434)
    • 1
      Great for team collaboration
    • 1
      It includes everything I need, all packaged with docker
    • 1
      Multilingual interface
    • 1
      The dashboard with deployed environments
    • 0
      Supports Radius/Ldap & Browser Code Edits
    CONS OF GITLAB
    • 25
      Slow ui performance
    • 6
      Introduce breaking bugs every release
    • 5
      Insecure (no published IP list for whitelisting)
    • 0
      Built-in Docker Registry
    • 0
      Review Apps feature

    related GitLab posts

    Tim Abbott
    Shared insights
    on
    GitHub
    GitLab
    at

    I have mixed feelings on GitHub as a product and our use of it for the Zulip open source project. On the one hand, I do feel that being on GitHub helps people discover Zulip, because we have enough stars (etc.) that we rank highly among projects on the platform. and there is a definite benefit for lowering barriers to contribution (which is important to us) that GitHub has such a dominant position in terms of what everyone has accounts with.

    But even ignoring how one might feel about their new corporate owner (MicroSoft), in a lot of ways GitHub is a bad product for open source projects. Years after the "Dear GitHub" letter, there are still basic gaps in its issue tracker:

    • You can't give someone permission to label/categorize issues without full write access to a project (including ability to merge things to master, post releases, etc.).
    • You can't let anyone with a GitHub account self-assign issues to themselves.
    • Many more similar issues.

    It's embarrassing, because I've talked to GitHub product managers at various open source events about these things for 3 years, and they always agree the thing is important, but then nothing ever improves in the Issues product. Maybe the new management at MicroSoft will fix their product management situation, but if not, I imagine we'll eventually do the migration to GitLab.

    We have a custom bot project, http://github.com/zulip/zulipbot, to deal with some of these issues where possible, and every other large project we talk to does the same thing, more or less.

    See more
    Joshua Dean Küpper
    CEO at Scrayos UG (haftungsbeschränkt) · | 17 upvotes · 209.1K views

    We use GitLab CI because of the great native integration as a part of the GitLab framework and the linting-capabilities it offers. The visualization of complex pipelines and the embedding within the project overview made Gitlab CI even more convenient. We use it for all projects, all deployments and as a part of GitLab Pages.

    While we initially used the Shell-executor, we quickly switched to the Docker-executor and use it exclusively now.

    We formerly used Jenkins but preferred to handle everything within GitLab . Aside from the unification of our infrastructure another motivation was the "configuration-in-file"-approach, that Gitlab CI offered, while Jenkins support of this concept was very limited and users had to resort to using the webinterface. Since the file is included within the repository, it is also version controlled, which was a huge plus for us.

    See more
    ESLint logo

    ESLint

    12K
    7.2K
    24
    The fully pluggable JavaScript code quality tool
    12K
    7.2K
    + 1
    24
    PROS OF ESLINT
    • 7
      Consistent javascript - opinions don't matter anymore
    • 5
      IDE Integration
    • 4
      Free
    • 3
      Customizable
    • 2
      Focuses code review on quality not style
    • 2
      Broad ecosystem of support & users
    • 1
      ES6 Support
    CONS OF ESLINT
      Be the first to leave a con

      related ESLint posts

      Simon Reymann
      Senior Fullstack Developer at QUANTUSflow Software GmbH · | 28 upvotes · 2.5M views

      Our whole DevOps stack consists of the following tools:

      • GitHub (incl. GitHub Pages/Markdown for Documentation, GettingStarted and HowTo's) for collaborative review and code management tool
      • Respectively Git as revision control system
      • SourceTree as Git GUI
      • Visual Studio Code as IDE
      • CircleCI for continuous integration (automatize development process)
      • Prettier / TSLint / ESLint as code linter
      • SonarQube as quality gate
      • Docker as container management (incl. Docker Compose for multi-container application management)
      • VirtualBox for operating system simulation tests
      • Kubernetes as cluster management for docker containers
      • Heroku for deploying in test environments
      • nginx as web server (preferably used as facade server in production environment)
      • SSLMate (using OpenSSL) for certificate management
      • Amazon EC2 (incl. Amazon S3) for deploying in stage (production-like) and production environments
      • PostgreSQL as preferred database system
      • Redis as preferred in-memory database/store (great for caching)

      The main reason we have chosen Kubernetes over Docker Swarm is related to the following artifacts:

      • Key features: Easy and flexible installation, Clear dashboard, Great scaling operations, Monitoring is an integral part, Great load balancing concepts, Monitors the condition and ensures compensation in the event of failure.
      • Applications: An application can be deployed using a combination of pods, deployments, and services (or micro-services).
      • Functionality: Kubernetes as a complex installation and setup process, but it not as limited as Docker Swarm.
      • Monitoring: It supports multiple versions of logging and monitoring when the services are deployed within the cluster (Elasticsearch/Kibana (ELK), Heapster/Grafana, Sysdig cloud integration).
      • Scalability: All-in-one framework for distributed systems.
      • Other Benefits: Kubernetes is backed by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), huge community among container orchestration tools, it is an open source and modular tool that works with any OS.
      See more
      Johnny Bell
      Software Engineer at Weedmaps · | 19 upvotes · 1.2M views

      So when starting a new project you generally have your go to tools to get your site up and running locally, and some scripts to build out a production version of your site. Create React App is great for that, however for my projects I feel as though there is to much bloat in Create React App and if I use it, then I'm tied to React, which I love but if I want to switch it up to Vue or something I want that flexibility.

      So to start everything up and running I clone my personal Webpack boilerplate - This is still in Webpack 3, and does need some updating but gets the job done for now. So given the name of the repo you may have guessed that yes I am using Webpack as my bundler I use Webpack because it is so powerful, and even though it has a steep learning curve once you get it, its amazing.

      The next thing I do is make sure my machine has Node.js configured and the right version installed then run Yarn. I decided to use Yarn because when I was building out this project npm had some shortcomings such as no .lock file. I could probably move from Yarn to npm but I don't really see any point really.

      I use Babel to transpile all of my #ES6 to #ES5 so the browser can read it, I love Babel and to be honest haven't looked up any other transpilers because Babel is amazing.

      Finally when developing I have Prettier setup to make sure all my code is clean and uniform across all my JS files, and ESLint to make sure I catch any errors or code that could be optimized.

      I'm really happy with this stack for my local env setup, and I'll probably stick with it for a while.

      See more
      Prettier logo

      Prettier

      1.5K
      393
      6
      Prettier is an opinionated code formatter.
      1.5K
      393
      + 1
      6
      PROS OF PRETTIER
      • 1
        Atom/VSCode package
      • 1
        Follows the Ruby Style Guide by default
      • 1
        Customizable
      • 1
        Runs offline
      • 1
        Completely free
      • 1
        Open Source
      CONS OF PRETTIER
        Be the first to leave a con

        related Prettier posts

        Simon Reymann
        Senior Fullstack Developer at QUANTUSflow Software GmbH · | 28 upvotes · 2.5M views

        Our whole DevOps stack consists of the following tools:

        • GitHub (incl. GitHub Pages/Markdown for Documentation, GettingStarted and HowTo's) for collaborative review and code management tool
        • Respectively Git as revision control system
        • SourceTree as Git GUI
        • Visual Studio Code as IDE
        • CircleCI for continuous integration (automatize development process)
        • Prettier / TSLint / ESLint as code linter
        • SonarQube as quality gate
        • Docker as container management (incl. Docker Compose for multi-container application management)
        • VirtualBox for operating system simulation tests
        • Kubernetes as cluster management for docker containers
        • Heroku for deploying in test environments
        • nginx as web server (preferably used as facade server in production environment)
        • SSLMate (using OpenSSL) for certificate management
        • Amazon EC2 (incl. Amazon S3) for deploying in stage (production-like) and production environments
        • PostgreSQL as preferred database system
        • Redis as preferred in-memory database/store (great for caching)

        The main reason we have chosen Kubernetes over Docker Swarm is related to the following artifacts:

        • Key features: Easy and flexible installation, Clear dashboard, Great scaling operations, Monitoring is an integral part, Great load balancing concepts, Monitors the condition and ensures compensation in the event of failure.
        • Applications: An application can be deployed using a combination of pods, deployments, and services (or micro-services).
        • Functionality: Kubernetes as a complex installation and setup process, but it not as limited as Docker Swarm.
        • Monitoring: It supports multiple versions of logging and monitoring when the services are deployed within the cluster (Elasticsearch/Kibana (ELK), Heapster/Grafana, Sysdig cloud integration).
        • Scalability: All-in-one framework for distributed systems.
        • Other Benefits: Kubernetes is backed by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), huge community among container orchestration tools, it is an open source and modular tool that works with any OS.
        See more
        Johnny Bell
        Software Engineer at Weedmaps · | 19 upvotes · 1.2M views

        So when starting a new project you generally have your go to tools to get your site up and running locally, and some scripts to build out a production version of your site. Create React App is great for that, however for my projects I feel as though there is to much bloat in Create React App and if I use it, then I'm tied to React, which I love but if I want to switch it up to Vue or something I want that flexibility.

        So to start everything up and running I clone my personal Webpack boilerplate - This is still in Webpack 3, and does need some updating but gets the job done for now. So given the name of the repo you may have guessed that yes I am using Webpack as my bundler I use Webpack because it is so powerful, and even though it has a steep learning curve once you get it, its amazing.

        The next thing I do is make sure my machine has Node.js configured and the right version installed then run Yarn. I decided to use Yarn because when I was building out this project npm had some shortcomings such as no .lock file. I could probably move from Yarn to npm but I don't really see any point really.

        I use Babel to transpile all of my #ES6 to #ES5 so the browser can read it, I love Babel and to be honest haven't looked up any other transpilers because Babel is amazing.

        Finally when developing I have Prettier setup to make sure all my code is clean and uniform across all my JS files, and ESLint to make sure I catch any errors or code that could be optimized.

        I'm really happy with this stack for my local env setup, and I'll probably stick with it for a while.

        See more
        SonarQube logo

        SonarQube

        1.1K
        1.3K
        35
        Continuous Code Quality
        1.1K
        1.3K
        + 1
        35
        PROS OF SONARQUBE
        • 18
          Tracks code complexity and smell trends
        • 11
          IDE Integration
        • 6
          Complete code Review
        CONS OF SONARQUBE
        • 4
          Sales process is long and unfriendly
        • 3
          Paid support is poor, techs arrogant and unhelpful

        related SonarQube posts

        Simon Reymann
        Senior Fullstack Developer at QUANTUSflow Software GmbH · | 28 upvotes · 2.5M views

        Our whole DevOps stack consists of the following tools:

        • GitHub (incl. GitHub Pages/Markdown for Documentation, GettingStarted and HowTo's) for collaborative review and code management tool
        • Respectively Git as revision control system
        • SourceTree as Git GUI
        • Visual Studio Code as IDE
        • CircleCI for continuous integration (automatize development process)
        • Prettier / TSLint / ESLint as code linter
        • SonarQube as quality gate
        • Docker as container management (incl. Docker Compose for multi-container application management)
        • VirtualBox for operating system simulation tests
        • Kubernetes as cluster management for docker containers
        • Heroku for deploying in test environments
        • nginx as web server (preferably used as facade server in production environment)
        • SSLMate (using OpenSSL) for certificate management
        • Amazon EC2 (incl. Amazon S3) for deploying in stage (production-like) and production environments
        • PostgreSQL as preferred database system
        • Redis as preferred in-memory database/store (great for caching)

        The main reason we have chosen Kubernetes over Docker Swarm is related to the following artifacts:

        • Key features: Easy and flexible installation, Clear dashboard, Great scaling operations, Monitoring is an integral part, Great load balancing concepts, Monitors the condition and ensures compensation in the event of failure.
        • Applications: An application can be deployed using a combination of pods, deployments, and services (or micro-services).
        • Functionality: Kubernetes as a complex installation and setup process, but it not as limited as Docker Swarm.
        • Monitoring: It supports multiple versions of logging and monitoring when the services are deployed within the cluster (Elasticsearch/Kibana (ELK), Heapster/Grafana, Sysdig cloud integration).
        • Scalability: All-in-one framework for distributed systems.
        • Other Benefits: Kubernetes is backed by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), huge community among container orchestration tools, it is an open source and modular tool that works with any OS.
        See more
        Ganesa Vijayakumar
        Full Stack Coder | Module Lead · | 18 upvotes · 2.2M views

        I'm planning to create a web application and also a mobile application to provide a very good shopping experience to the end customers. Shortly, my application will be aggregate the product details from difference sources and giving a clear picture to the user that when and where to buy that product with best in Quality and cost.

        I have planned to develop this in many milestones for adding N number of features and I have picked my first part to complete the core part (aggregate the product details from different sources).

        As per my work experience and knowledge, I have chosen the followings stacks to this mission.

        UI: I would like to develop this application using React, React Router and React Native since I'm a little bit familiar on this and also most importantly these will help on developing both web and mobile apps. In addition, I'm gonna use the stacks JavaScript, jQuery, jQuery UI, jQuery Mobile, Bootstrap wherever required.

        Service: I have planned to use Java as the main business layer language as I have 7+ years of experience on this I believe I can do better work using Java than other languages. In addition, I'm thinking to use the stacks Node.js.

        Database and ORM: I'm gonna pick MySQL as DB and Hibernate as ORM since I have a piece of good knowledge and also work experience on this combination.

        Search Engine: I need to deal with a large amount of product data and it's in-detailed info to provide enough details to end user at the same time I need to focus on the performance area too. so I have decided to use Solr as a search engine for product search and suggestions. In addition, I'm thinking to replace Solr by Elasticsearch once explored/reviewed enough about Elasticsearch.

        Host: As of now, my plan to complete the application with decent features first and deploy it in a free hosting environment like Docker and Heroku and then once it is stable then I have planned to use the AWS products Amazon S3, EC2, Amazon RDS and Amazon Route 53. I'm not sure about Microsoft Azure that what is the specialty in it than Heroku and Amazon EC2 Container Service. Anyhow, I will do explore these once again and pick the best suite one for my requirement once I reached this level.

        Build and Repositories: I have decided to choose Apache Maven and Git as these are my favorites and also so popular on respectively build and repositories.

        Additional Utilities :) - I would like to choose Codacy for code review as their Startup plan will be very helpful to this application. I'm already experienced with Google CheckStyle and SonarQube even I'm looking something on Codacy.

        Happy Coding! Suggestions are welcome! :)

        Thanks, Ganesa

        See more
        Snyk logo

        Snyk

        527
        175
        2
        Automatically find & fix vulnerabilities in your code, containers, Kubernetes, and Terraform
        527
        175
        + 1
        2
        PROS OF SNYK
        • 1
          Github Integration
        • 1
          Free for open source projects
        CONS OF SNYK
          Be the first to leave a con

          related Snyk posts

          Bryan Dady
          SRE Manager at Subsplash · | 3 upvotes · 195.1K views

          I'm beginning to research the right way to better integrate how we achieve SCA / shift-left / SecureDevOps / secure software supply chain. If you use or have evaluated WhiteSource, Snyk, Sonatype Nexus, SonarQube or similar, I would very much appreciate your perspective on strengths and weaknesses and how you selected your ultimate solution. I want to integrate with GitLab CI.

          See more
          Code Climate logo

          Code Climate

          491
          423
          276
          Automated Ruby Code Review
          491
          423
          + 1
          276
          PROS OF CODE CLIMATE
          • 70
            Auto sync with Github
          • 49
            Simple grade system that motivates to keep code clean
          • 44
            Better coding
          • 29
            Free for open source
          • 21
            Hotspots for quick refactoring candidates
          • 15
            Continued encouragement to a have better / cleaner code
          • 13
            Great UI
          • 11
            Makes you a better coder
          • 10
            Duplication Detection
          • 5
            Safe and Secure
          • 2
            Private
          • 1
            GitHub integration, status inline in PRs
          • 1
            Locally Installable API
          • 1
            Uses rubocop
          • 1
            GitHub only
          • 1
            Extremely accurate in telling you the errors
          • 1
            Python inspection
          • 1
            great open community
          CONS OF CODE CLIMATE
          • 1
            Learning curve, static analysis comparable to eslint
          • 1
            Complains about small stylistic decisions

          related Code Climate posts

          Jerome Dalbert
          Senior Backend Engineer at StackShare · | 5 upvotes · 408.1K views

          The continuous integration process for our Rails backend app starts by opening a GitHub pull request. This triggers a CircleCI build and some Code Climate checks.

          The CircleCI build is a workflow that runs the following jobs:

          • check for security vulnerabilities with Brakeman
          • check code quality with RuboCop
          • run RSpec tests in parallel with the knapsack gem, and output test coverage reports with the simplecov gem
          • upload test coverage to Code Climate

          Code Climate checks the following:

          • code quality metrics like code complexity
          • test coverage minimum thresholds

          The CircleCI jobs and Code Climate checks above have corresponding GitHub status checks.

          Once all the mandatory GitHub checks pass and the code+functionality have been reviewed, developers can merge their pull request into our Git master branch. Code is then ready to deploy!

          #ContinuousIntegration

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