Ruby vs Smalltalk

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Ruby
Ruby

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Smalltalk
Smalltalk

43
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0
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Ruby vs Smalltalk: What are the differences?

Developers describe Ruby as "A dynamic, interpreted, open source programming language with a focus on simplicity and productivity". Ruby is a language of careful balance. Its creator, Yukihiro “Matz” Matsumoto, blended parts of his favorite languages (Perl, Smalltalk, Eiffel, Ada, and Lisp) to form a new language that balanced functional programming with imperative programming. On the other hand, Smalltalk is detailed as "An object-oriented, dynamically typed reflective programming language". It is an object-oriented, dynamically typed reflective programming language. It was created as the language underpinning the "new world" of computing exemplified by "human–computer symbiosis". It was designed and created in part for educational use, specifically for constructionist learning.

Ruby and Smalltalk can be primarily classified as "Languages" tools.

Ruby is an open source tool with 16.2K GitHub stars and 4.32K GitHub forks. Here's a link to Ruby's open source repository on GitHub.

- No public GitHub repository available -

What is Ruby?

Ruby is a language of careful balance. Its creator, Yukihiro “Matz” Matsumoto, blended parts of his favorite languages (Perl, Smalltalk, Eiffel, Ada, and Lisp) to form a new language that balanced functional programming with imperative programming.

What is Smalltalk?

It is an object-oriented, dynamically typed reflective programming language. It was created as the language underpinning the "new world" of computing exemplified by "human–computer symbiosis". It was designed and created in part for educational use, specifically for constructionist learning.
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      What are some alternatives to Ruby and Smalltalk?
      Python
      Python is a general purpose programming language created by Guido Van Rossum. Python is most praised for its elegant syntax and readable code, if you are just beginning your programming career python suits you best.
      JavaScript
      JavaScript is most known as the scripting language for Web pages, but used in many non-browser environments as well such as node.js or Apache CouchDB. It is a prototype-based, multi-paradigm scripting language that is dynamic,and supports object-oriented, imperative, and functional programming styles.
      PHP
      Fast, flexible and pragmatic, PHP powers everything from your blog to the most popular websites in the world.
      Java
      Java is a programming language and computing platform first released by Sun Microsystems in 1995. There are lots of applications and websites that will not work unless you have Java installed, and more are created every day. Java is fast, secure, and reliable. From laptops to datacenters, game consoles to scientific supercomputers, cell phones to the Internet, Java is everywhere!
      Groovy
      Groovy builds upon the strengths of Java but has additional power features inspired by languages like Python, Ruby and Smalltalk. It makes modern programming features available to Java developers with almost-zero learning curve.
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      Decisions about Ruby and Smalltalk
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      Dima Korolev
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