Alternatives to CometD logo

Alternatives to CometD

Socket.IO, RabbitMQ, Kafka, Apache Camel, and Atmosphere are the most popular alternatives and competitors to CometD.
10
23
+ 1
0

What is CometD and what are its top alternatives?

It is a web server to push data to a browser, without the browser explicitly requesting it. It is an umbrella term, encompassing multiple techniques for achieving this interaction.
CometD is a tool in the Web Servers category of a tech stack.
CometD is an open source tool with GitHub stars and GitHub forks. Here’s a link to CometD's open source repository on GitHub

Top Alternatives to CometD

  • Socket.IO

    Socket.IO

    It enables real-time bidirectional event-based communication. It works on every platform, browser or device, focusing equally on reliability and speed. ...

  • RabbitMQ

    RabbitMQ

    RabbitMQ gives your applications a common platform to send and receive messages, and your messages a safe place to live until received. ...

  • Kafka

    Kafka

    Kafka is a distributed, partitioned, replicated commit log service. It provides the functionality of a messaging system, but with a unique design. ...

  • Apache Camel

    Apache Camel

    An open source Java framework that focuses on making integration easier and more accessible to developers. ...

  • Atmosphere

    Atmosphere

    The Atmosphere Framework contains client and server side components for building Asynchronous Web Applications. The majority of popular frameworks are either supporting Atmosphere or supported natively by the framework. The Atmosphere Framework supports all major Browsers and Servers. ...

  • SignalR

    SignalR

    SignalR allows bi-directional communication between server and client. Servers can now push content to connected clients instantly as it becomes available. SignalR supports Web Sockets, and falls back to other compatible techniques for older browsers. SignalR includes APIs for connection management (for instance, connect and disconnect events), grouping connections, and authorization. ...

  • NGINX

    NGINX

    nginx [engine x] is an HTTP and reverse proxy server, as well as a mail proxy server, written by Igor Sysoev. According to Netcraft nginx served or proxied 30.46% of the top million busiest sites in Jan 2018. ...

  • Apache HTTP Server

    Apache HTTP Server

    The Apache HTTP Server is a powerful and flexible HTTP/1.1 compliant web server. Originally designed as a replacement for the NCSA HTTP Server, it has grown to be the most popular web server on the Internet. ...

CometD alternatives & related posts

Socket.IO logo

Socket.IO

8.9K
7.5K
777
Realtime application framework (Node.JS server)
8.9K
7.5K
+ 1
777
PROS OF SOCKET.IO
  • 214
    Real-time
  • 143
    Event-based communication
  • 142
    Node.js
  • 102
    Open source
  • 102
    WebSockets
  • 26
    Binary streaming
  • 22
    No internet dependency
  • 9
    Fallback to polling if WebSockets not supported
  • 8
    Large community
  • 5
    Ease of access and setup
  • 4
    Push notification
CONS OF SOCKET.IO
  • 11
    Bad documentation
  • 4
    Githubs that complement it are mostly deprecated
  • 3
    Doesn't work on React Native
  • 2
    Websocket Errors
  • 2
    Small community

related Socket.IO posts

across_the_grid
Full-stack web developer · | 10 upvotes · 337.9K views
Shared insights
on
Socket.IOSocket.IONode.jsNode.jsExpressJSExpressJS

I use Socket.IO because the application has 2 frontend clients, which need to communicate in real-time. The backend-server handles the communication between these two clients via websockets. Socket.io is very easy to set up in Node.js and ExpressJS.

In the research project, the 1st client shows panoramic videos in a so called cave system (it is the VR setup of our research lab, which consists of three big screens, which are specially arranged, so the user experience the videos more immersive), the 2nd client controls the videos/locations of the 1st client.

See more

We are starting to work on a web-based platform aiming to connect artists (clients) and professional freelancers (service providers). In-app, timeline-based, real-time communication between users (& storing it), file transfers, and push notifications are essential core features. We are considering using Node.js, ExpressJS, React, MongoDB stack with Socket.IO & Apollo, or maybe using Real-Time Database and functionalities of Firebase.

See more
RabbitMQ logo

RabbitMQ

14.7K
12.8K
518
Open source multiprotocol messaging broker
14.7K
12.8K
+ 1
518
PROS OF RABBITMQ
  • 229
    It's fast and it works with good metrics/monitoring
  • 79
    Ease of configuration
  • 58
    I like the admin interface
  • 50
    Easy to set-up and start with
  • 20
    Durable
  • 18
    Intuitive work through python
  • 18
    Standard protocols
  • 10
    Written primarily in Erlang
  • 8
    Simply superb
  • 6
    Completeness of messaging patterns
  • 3
    Scales to 1 million messages per second
  • 3
    Reliable
  • 2
    Better than most traditional queue based message broker
  • 2
    Distributed
  • 2
    Supports AMQP
  • 1
    Inubit Integration
  • 1
    Supports MQTT
  • 1
    Runs on Open Telecom Platform
  • 1
    High performance
  • 1
    Reliability
  • 1
    Clusterable
  • 1
    Clear documentation with different scripting language
  • 1
    Great ui
  • 1
    Better routing system
  • 1
    Delayed messages
CONS OF RABBITMQ
  • 9
    Too complicated cluster/HA config and management
  • 6
    Needs Erlang runtime. Need ops good with Erlang runtime
  • 5
    Configuration must be done first, not by your code
  • 4
    Slow

related RabbitMQ posts

James Cunningham
Operations Engineer at Sentry · | 18 upvotes · 1.3M views
Shared insights
on
CeleryCeleryRabbitMQRabbitMQ
at

As Sentry runs throughout the day, there are about 50 different offline tasks that we execute—anything from “process this event, pretty please” to “send all of these cool people some emails.” There are some that we execute once a day and some that execute thousands per second.

Managing this variety requires a reliably high-throughput message-passing technology. We use Celery's RabbitMQ implementation, and we stumbled upon a great feature called Federation that allows us to partition our task queue across any number of RabbitMQ servers and gives us the confidence that, if any single server gets backlogged, others will pitch in and distribute some of the backlogged tasks to their consumers.

#MessageQueue

See more
Yogesh Bhondekar
Co-Founder at weconnect.chat · | 15 upvotes · 94.3K views

Hi, I am building an enhanced web-conferencing app that will have a voice/video call, live chats, live notifications, live discussions, screen sharing, etc features. Ref: Zoom.

I need advise finalizing the tech stack for this app. I am considering below tech stack:

  • Frontend: React
  • Backend: Node.js
  • Database: MongoDB
  • IAAS: #AWS
  • Containers & Orchestration: Docker / Kubernetes
  • DevOps: GitLab, Terraform
  • Brokers: Redis / RabbitMQ

I need advice at the platform level as to what could be considered to support concurrent video streaming seamlessly.

Also, please suggest what could be a better tech stack for my app?

#SAAS #VideoConferencing #WebAndVideoConferencing #zoom #stack

See more
Kafka logo

Kafka

15.6K
14.7K
573
Distributed, fault tolerant, high throughput pub-sub messaging system
15.6K
14.7K
+ 1
573
PROS OF KAFKA
  • 122
    High-throughput
  • 116
    Distributed
  • 87
    Scalable
  • 81
    High-Performance
  • 65
    Durable
  • 36
    Publish-Subscribe
  • 19
    Simple-to-use
  • 15
    Open source
  • 10
    Written in Scala and java. Runs on JVM
  • 6
    Message broker + Streaming system
  • 4
    Avro schema integration
  • 2
    Suport Multiple clients
  • 2
    Robust
  • 2
    KSQL
  • 2
    Partioned, replayable log
  • 1
    Fun
  • 1
    Extremely good parallelism constructs
  • 1
    Simple publisher / multi-subscriber model
  • 1
    Flexible
CONS OF KAFKA
  • 27
    Non-Java clients are second-class citizens
  • 26
    Needs Zookeeper
  • 7
    Operational difficulties
  • 2
    Terrible Packaging

related Kafka posts

Eric Colson
Chief Algorithms Officer at Stitch Fix · | 21 upvotes · 2M views

The algorithms and data infrastructure at Stitch Fix is housed in #AWS. Data acquisition is split between events flowing through Kafka, and periodic snapshots of PostgreSQL DBs. We store data in an Amazon S3 based data warehouse. Apache Spark on Yarn is our tool of choice for data movement and #ETL. Because our storage layer (s3) is decoupled from our processing layer, we are able to scale our compute environment very elastically. We have several semi-permanent, autoscaling Yarn clusters running to serve our data processing needs. While the bulk of our compute infrastructure is dedicated to algorithmic processing, we also implemented Presto for adhoc queries and dashboards.

Beyond data movement and ETL, most #ML centric jobs (e.g. model training and execution) run in a similarly elastic environment as containers running Python and R code on Amazon EC2 Container Service clusters. The execution of batch jobs on top of ECS is managed by Flotilla, a service we built in house and open sourced (see https://github.com/stitchfix/flotilla-os).

At Stitch Fix, algorithmic integrations are pervasive across the business. We have dozens of data products actively integrated systems. That requires serving layer that is robust, agile, flexible, and allows for self-service. Models produced on Flotilla are packaged for deployment in production using Khan, another framework we've developed internally. Khan provides our data scientists the ability to quickly productionize those models they've developed with open source frameworks in Python 3 (e.g. PyTorch, sklearn), by automatically packaging them as Docker containers and deploying to Amazon ECS. This provides our data scientist a one-click method of getting from their algorithms to production. We then integrate those deployments into a service mesh, which allows us to A/B test various implementations in our product.

For more info:

#DataScience #DataStack #Data

See more
John Kodumal

As we've evolved or added additional infrastructure to our stack, we've biased towards managed services. Most new backing stores are Amazon RDS instances now. We do use self-managed PostgreSQL with TimescaleDB for time-series data—this is made HA with the use of Patroni and Consul.

We also use managed Amazon ElastiCache instances instead of spinning up Amazon EC2 instances to run Redis workloads, as well as shifting to Amazon Kinesis instead of Kafka.

See more
Apache Camel logo

Apache Camel

422
224
21
A versatile open source integration framework
422
224
+ 1
21
PROS OF APACHE CAMEL
  • 5
    Based on Enterprise Integration Patterns
  • 4
    Free (open source)
  • 4
    Highly configurable
  • 3
    Open Source
  • 3
    Has over 250 components
  • 2
    Has great community
CONS OF APACHE CAMEL
    Be the first to leave a con

    related Apache Camel posts

    Atmosphere logo

    Atmosphere

    7
    17
    10
    Realtime Client Server Framework for the JVM, supporting WebSockets and Cross-Browser Fallbacks Support
    7
    17
    + 1
    10
    PROS OF ATMOSPHERE
    • 3
      JVM
    • 3
      Cross-Browse
    • 2
      Open source
    • 2
      WebSockets
    CONS OF ATMOSPHERE
      Be the first to leave a con

      related Atmosphere posts

      SignalR logo

      SignalR

      378
      989
      108
      A new library for ASP.NET developers that makes developing real-time web functionality easy.
      378
      989
      + 1
      108
      PROS OF SIGNALR
      • 25
        Supports .NET server
      • 17
        Real-time
      • 13
        Free
      • 13
        Fallback to SSE, forever frame, long polling
      • 12
        WebSockets
      • 7
        Simple
      • 7
        JSON
      • 6
        Open source
      • 4
        Ease of use
      • 4
        Cool
      CONS OF SIGNALR
      • 2
        Requires jQuery
      • 2
        Expertise hard to get
      • 1
        Weak iOS and Android support
      • 1
        Big differences between ASP.NET and Core versions

      related SignalR posts

      Shared insights
      on
      gRPCgRPCSignalRSignalR.NET.NET

      We need to interact from several different Web applications (remote) to a client-side application (.exe in .NET Framework, Windows.Console under our controlled environment). From the web applications, we need to send and receive data and invoke methods to client-side .exe on javascript events like users onclick. SignalR is one of the .Net alternatives to do that, but it adds overhead for what we need. Is it better to add SignalR at both client-side application and remote web application, or use gRPC as it sounds lightest and is multilingual?

      SignalR or gRPC are always sending and receiving data on the client-side (from browser to .exe and back to browser). And web application is used for graphical visualization of data to the user. There is no need for local .exe to send or interact with remote web API. Which architecture or framework do you suggest to use in this case?

      See more
      NGINX logo

      NGINX

      93.7K
      44.1K
      5.5K
      A high performance free open source web server powering busiest sites on the Internet.
      93.7K
      44.1K
      + 1
      5.5K
      PROS OF NGINX
      • 1.4K
        High-performance http server
      • 896
        Performance
      • 728
        Easy to configure
      • 606
        Open source
      • 529
        Load balancer
      • 286
        Scalability
      • 285
        Free
      • 222
        Web server
      • 173
        Simplicity
      • 134
        Easy setup
      • 29
        Content caching
      • 19
        Web Accelerator
      • 14
        Capability
      • 13
        Fast
      • 11
        Predictability
      • 10
        High-latency
      • 7
        Reverse Proxy
      • 6
        Supports http/2
      • 4
        The best of them
      • 4
        Lots of Modules
      • 4
        Enterprise version
      • 4
        Great Community
      • 3
        High perfomance proxy server
      • 3
        Streaming media
      • 3
        Embedded Lua scripting
      • 3
        Reversy Proxy
      • 3
        Streaming media delivery
      • 2
        Fast and easy to set up
      • 2
        Lightweight
      • 2
        Slim
      • 2
        saltstack
      • 1
        Virtual hosting
      • 1
        Blash
      • 1
        GRPC-Web
      • 1
        Ingress controller
      • 1
        Narrow focus. Easy to configure. Fast
      • 1
        Along with Redis Cache its the Most superior
      • 0
        A
      CONS OF NGINX
      • 8
        Advanced features require subscription

      related NGINX posts

      Recently I have been working on an open source stack to help people consolidate their personal health data in a single database so that AI and analytics apps can be run against it to find personalized treatments. We chose to go with a #containerized approach leveraging Docker #containers with a local development environment setup with Docker Compose and nginx for container routing. For the production environment we chose to pull code from GitHub and build/push images using Jenkins and using Kubernetes to deploy to Amazon EC2.

      We also implemented a dashboard app to handle user authentication/authorization, as well as a custom SSO server that runs on Heroku which allows experts to easily visit more than one instance without having to login repeatedly. The #Backend was implemented using my favorite #Stack which consists of FeathersJS on top of Node.js and ExpressJS with PostgreSQL as the main database. The #Frontend was implemented using React, Redux.js, Semantic UI React and the FeathersJS client. Though testing was light on this project, we chose to use AVA as well as ESLint to keep the codebase clean and consistent.

      See more
      Gabriel Pa
      Shared insights
      on
      TraefikTraefikNGINXNGINX
      at

      We switched to Traefik so we can use the REST API to dynamically configure subdomains and have the ability to redirect between multiple servers.

      We still use nginx with a docker-compose to expose the traffic from our APIs and TCP microservices, but for managing routing to the internet Traefik does a much better job

      The biggest win for naologic was the ability to set dynamic configurations without having to restart the server

      See more
      Apache HTTP Server logo

      Apache HTTP Server

      59K
      17.9K
      1.4K
      The most popular web server on the Internet since April 1996
      59K
      17.9K
      + 1
      1.4K
      PROS OF APACHE HTTP SERVER
      • 477
        Web server
      • 305
        Most widely-used web server
      • 218
        Virtual hosting
      • 148
        Fast
      • 138
        Ssl support
      • 45
        Since 1996
      • 28
        Asynchronous
      • 5
        Robust
      • 4
        Proven over many years
      • 1
        Mature
      • 1
        Perfect Support
      • 1
        Perfomance
      • 0
        Many available modules
      • 0
        Many available modules
      CONS OF APACHE HTTP SERVER
      • 2
        Hard to set up

      related Apache HTTP Server posts

      Tim Abbott
      Shared insights
      on
      NGINXNGINXApache HTTP ServerApache HTTP Server
      at

      We've been happy with nginx as part of our stack. As an open source web application that folks install on-premise, the configuration system for the webserver is pretty important to us. I have a few complaints (e.g. the configuration syntax for conditionals is a pain), but overall we've found it pretty easy to build a configurable set of options (see link) for how to run Zulip on nginx, both directly and with a remote reverse proxy in front of it, with a minimum of code duplication.

      Certainly I've been a lot happier with it than I was working with Apache HTTP Server in past projects.

      See more
      Marcel Kornegoor
      Shared insights
      on
      NGINXNGINXApache HTTP ServerApache HTTP Server

      nginx or Apache HTTP Server that's the question. The best choice depends on what it needs to serve. In general, Nginx performs better with static content, where Apache and Nginx score roughly the same when it comes to dynamic content. Since most webpages and web-applications use both static and dynamic content, a combination of both platforms may be the best solution.

      Since both webservers are easy to deploy and free to use, setting up a performance or feature comparison test is no big deal. This way you can see what solutions suits your application or content best. Don't forget to look at other aspects, like security, back-end compatibility (easy of integration) and manageability, as well.

      A reasonably good comparison between the two can be found in the link below.

      See more