Alternatives to Kue logo

Alternatives to Kue

Bull, RabbitMQ, Celery, Sidekiq, and Resque are the most popular alternatives and competitors to Kue.
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What is Kue and what are its top alternatives?

Kue is a feature rich priority job queue for node.js backed by redis. A key feature of Kue is its clean user-interface for viewing and managing queued, active, failed, and completed jobs.
Kue is a tool in the Background Processing category of a tech stack.
Kue is an open source tool with 9.2K GitHub stars and 898 GitHub forks. Here’s a link to Kue's open source repository on GitHub

Top Alternatives to Kue

  • Bull

    Bull

    The fastest, most reliable, Redis-based queue for Node. Carefully written for rock solid stability and atomicity. ...

  • RabbitMQ

    RabbitMQ

    RabbitMQ gives your applications a common platform to send and receive messages, and your messages a safe place to live until received. ...

  • Celery

    Celery

    Celery is an asynchronous task queue/job queue based on distributed message passing. It is focused on real-time operation, but supports scheduling as well. ...

  • Sidekiq

    Sidekiq

    Sidekiq uses threads to handle many jobs at the same time in the same process. It does not require Rails but will integrate tightly with Rails 3/4 to make background processing dead simple. ...

  • Resque

    Resque

    Background jobs can be any Ruby class or module that responds to perform. Your existing classes can easily be converted to background jobs or you can create new classes specifically to do work. Or, you can do both. ...

  • Beanstalkd

    Beanstalkd

    Beanstalks's interface is generic, but was originally designed for reducing the latency of page views in high-volume web applications by running time-consuming tasks asynchronously. ...

  • Hangfire

    Hangfire

    It is an open-source framework that helps you to create, process and manage your background jobs, i.e. operations you don't want to put in your request processing pipeline. It supports all kind of background tasks – short-running and long-running, CPU intensive and I/O intensive, one shot and recurrent. ...

  • PHP-FPM

    PHP-FPM

    It is an alternative PHP FastCGI implementation with some additional features useful for sites of any size, especially busier sites. It includes Adaptive process spawning, Advanced process management with graceful stop/start, Emergency restart in case of accidental opcode cache destruction etc. ...

Kue alternatives & related posts

Bull logo

Bull

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Premium Queue package for handling jobs and messages in NodeJS
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related Bull posts

related RabbitMQ posts

James Cunningham
Operations Engineer at Sentry · | 18 upvotes · 1.1M views
Shared insights
on
Celery
RabbitMQ
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As Sentry runs throughout the day, there are about 50 different offline tasks that we execute—anything from “process this event, pretty please” to “send all of these cool people some emails.” There are some that we execute once a day and some that execute thousands per second.

Managing this variety requires a reliably high-throughput message-passing technology. We use Celery's RabbitMQ implementation, and we stumbled upon a great feature called Federation that allows us to partition our task queue across any number of RabbitMQ servers and gives us the confidence that, if any single server gets backlogged, others will pitch in and distribute some of the backlogged tasks to their consumers.

#MessageQueue

See more
Tim Abbott
Shared insights
on
RabbitMQ
Python
Redis
at

We've been using RabbitMQ as Zulip's queuing system since we needed a queuing system. What I like about it is that it scales really well and has good libraries for a wide range of platforms, including our own Python. So aside from getting it running, we've had to put basically 0 effort into making it scale for our needs.

However, there's several things that could be better about it: * It's error messages are absolutely terrible; if ever one of our users ends up getting an error with RabbitMQ (even for simple things like a misconfigured hostname), they always end up needing to get help from the Zulip team, because the errors logs are just inscrutable. As an open source project, we've handled this issue by really carefully scripting the installation to be a failure-proof configuration (in this case, setting the RabbitMQ hostname to 127.0.0.1, so that no user-controlled configuration can break it). But it was a real pain to get there and the process of determining we needed to do that caused a significant amount of pain to folks installing Zulip. * The pika library for Python takes a lot of time to startup a RabbitMQ connection; this means that Zulip server restarts are more disruptive than would be ideal. * It's annoying that you need to run the rabbitmqctl management commands as root.

But overall, I like that it has clean, clear semanstics and high scalability, and haven't been tempted to do the work to migrate to something like Redis (which has its own downsides).

See more
Celery logo

Celery

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Distributed task queue
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related Celery posts

James Cunningham
Operations Engineer at Sentry · | 18 upvotes · 1.1M views
Shared insights
on
Celery
RabbitMQ
at

As Sentry runs throughout the day, there are about 50 different offline tasks that we execute—anything from “process this event, pretty please” to “send all of these cool people some emails.” There are some that we execute once a day and some that execute thousands per second.

Managing this variety requires a reliably high-throughput message-passing technology. We use Celery's RabbitMQ implementation, and we stumbled upon a great feature called Federation that allows us to partition our task queue across any number of RabbitMQ servers and gives us the confidence that, if any single server gets backlogged, others will pitch in and distribute some of the backlogged tasks to their consumers.

#MessageQueue

See more
Michael Mota

Automations are what makes a CRM powerful. With Celery and RabbitMQ we've been able to make powerful automations that truly works for our clients. Such as for example, automatic daily reports, reminders for their activities, important notifications regarding their client activities and actions on the website and more.

We use Celery basically for everything that needs to be scheduled for the future, and using RabbitMQ as our Queue-broker is amazing since it fully integrates with Django and Celery storing on our database results of the tasks done so we can see if anything fails immediately.

See more

related Sidekiq posts

Cyril Duchon-Doris

We decided to use AWS Lambda for several serverless tasks such as

  • Managing AWS backups
  • Processing emails received on Amazon SES and stored to Amazon S3 and notified via Amazon SNS, so as to push a message on our Redis so our Sidekiq Rails workers can process inbound emails
  • Pushing some relevant Amazon CloudWatch metrics and alarms to Slack
See more

I'm building a new process management tool. I decided to build with Rails as my backend, using Sidekiq for background jobs. I chose to work with these tools because I've worked with them before and know that they're able to get the job done. They may not be the sexiest tools, but they work and are reliable, which is what I was optimizing for. For data stores, I opted for PostgreSQL and Redis. Because I'm planning on offering dashboards, I wanted a SQL database instead of something like MongoDB that might work early on, but be difficult to use as soon as I want to facilitate aggregate queries.

On the front-end I'm using Vue.js and vuex in combination with #Turbolinks. In effect, I want to render most pages on the server side without key interactions being managed by Vue.js . This is the first project I'm working on where I've explicitly decided not to include jQuery . I have found React and Redux.js more confusing to setup. I appreciate the opinionated approach from the Vue.js community and that things just work together the way that I'd expect. To manage my javascript dependencies, I'm using Yarn .

For CSS frameworks, I'm using #Bulma.io. I really appreciate it's minimal nature and that there are no hard javascript dependencies. And to add a little spice, I'm using #font-awesome.

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Resque logo

Resque

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A Redis-backed Ruby library for creating background jobs, placing them on multiple queues, and processing them later
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CONS OF RESQUE
    No cons available

    related Resque posts

    Beanstalkd logo

    Beanstalkd

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    A simple, fast work queue
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    related Beanstalkd posts

    Frédéric MARAND
    Core Developer at OSInet · | 2 upvotes · 162.2K views

    I used Kafka originally because it was mandated as part of the top-level IT requirements at a Fortune 500 client. What I found was that it was orders of magnitude more complex ...and powerful than my daily Beanstalkd , and far more flexible, resilient, and manageable than RabbitMQ.

    So for any case where utmost flexibility and resilience are part of the deal, I would use Kafka again. But due to the complexities involved, for any time where this level of scalability is not required, I would probably just use Beanstalkd for its simplicity.

    I tend to find RabbitMQ to be in an uncomfortable middle place between these two extremities.

    See more
    Hangfire logo

    Hangfire

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    Perform background processing in .NET and .NET Core applications
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    CONS OF HANGFIRE
      No cons available

      related Hangfire posts

      PHP-FPM logo

      PHP-FPM

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      An alternative FastCGI daemon for PHP
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      PROS OF PHP-FPM
        No pros available
        CONS OF PHP-FPM
          No cons available

          related PHP-FPM posts