Amazon Route 53

Amazon Route 53

Utilities / Application Utilities / DNS Management

Decision about SonarQube, Codacy, Docker, Git, Apache Maven, Amazon EC2 Container Service, Microsoft Azure, Amazon Route 53, Elasticsearch, Solr, Amazon RDS, Amazon S3, Heroku, Hibernate, MySQL, Node.js, Java, Bootstrap, jQuery Mobile, jQuery UI, jQuery, JavaScript, React Native, React Router, React

Avatar of ganesa-vijayakumar
Full Stack Coder | Module Lead ·

I'm planning to create a web application and also a mobile application to provide a very good shopping experience to the end customers. Shortly, my application will be aggregate the product details from difference sources and giving a clear picture to the user that when and where to buy that product with best in Quality and cost.

I have planned to develop this in many milestones for adding N number of features and I have picked my first part to complete the core part (aggregate the product details from different sources).

As per my work experience and knowledge, I have chosen the followings stacks to this mission.

UI: I would like to develop this application using React, React Router and React Native since I'm a little bit familiar on this and also most importantly these will help on developing both web and mobile apps. In addition, I'm gonna use the stacks JavaScript, jQuery, jQuery UI, jQuery Mobile, Bootstrap wherever required.

Service: I have planned to use Java as the main business layer language as I have 7+ years of experience on this I believe I can do better work using Java than other languages. In addition, I'm thinking to use the stacks Node.js.

Database and ORM: I'm gonna pick MySQL as DB and Hibernate as ORM since I have a piece of good knowledge and also work experience on this combination.

Search Engine: I need to deal with a large amount of product data and it's in-detailed info to provide enough details to end user at the same time I need to focus on the performance area too. so I have decided to use Solr as a search engine for product search and suggestions. In addition, I'm thinking to replace Solr by Elasticsearch once explored/reviewed enough about Elasticsearch.

Host: As of now, my plan to complete the application with decent features first and deploy it in a free hosting environment like Docker and Heroku and then once it is stable then I have planned to use the AWS products Amazon S3, EC2, Amazon RDS and Amazon Route 53. I'm not sure about Microsoft Azure that what is the specialty in it than Heroku and Amazon EC2 Container Service. Anyhow, I will do explore these once again and pick the best suite one for my requirement once I reached this level.

Build and Repositories: I have decided to choose Apache Maven and Git as these are my favorites and also so popular on respectively build and repositories.

Additional Utilities :) - I would like to choose Codacy for code review as their Startup plan will be very helpful to this application. I'm already experienced with Google CheckStyle and SonarQube even I'm looking something on Codacy.

Happy Coding! Suggestions are welcome! :)

Thanks, Ganesa

15 upvotes·13 comments·145.9K views

Decision at SalesAutopilot Kft. about AWS CodePipeline, Jenkins, Docker, vuex, Vuetify, Vue.js, jQuery UI, Redis, MongoDB, MySQL, Amazon Route 53, Amazon CloudFront, Amazon SNS, Amazon CloudWatch, GitHub

Avatar of gykhauth
CTO at SalesAutopilot Kft. ·

I'm the CTO of a marketing automation SaaS. Because of the continuously increasing load we moved to the AWSCloud. We are using more and more features of AWS: Amazon CloudWatch, Amazon SNS, Amazon CloudFront, Amazon Route 53 and so on.

Our main Database is MySQL but for the hundreds of GB document data we use MongoDB more and more. We started to use Redis for cache and other time sensitive operations.

On the front-end we use jQuery UI + Smarty but now we refactor our app to use Vue.js with Vuetify. Because our app is relatively complex we need to use vuex as well.

On the development side we use GitHub as our main repo, Docker for local and server environment and Jenkins and AWS CodePipeline for Continuous Integration.

11 upvotes·53.9K views

Decision at Bettison.org Limited about Amazon EC2 Container Service, Docker, Amazon VPC, Amazon Route 53, Amazon SQS, Amazon SES, Amazon CloudFront, nginx, Unicorn, Ruby, Travis CI, Selenium, RSpec, Rails, Amazon ElastiCache, Redis, Sidekiq, Elasticsearch, PostgreSQL

Avatar of sgbett
Managing Director at Bettison.org Limited ·

In 2010 we made the very difficult decision to entirely re-engineer our existing monolithic LAMP application from the ground up in order to address some growing concerns about it's long term viability as a platform.

Full application re-write is almost always never the answer, because of the risks involved. However the situation warranted drastic action as it was clear that the existing product was going to face severe scaling issues. We felt it better address these sooner rather than later and also take the opportunity to improve the international architecture and also to refactor the database in. order that it better matched the changes in core functionality.

PostgreSQL was chosen for its reputation as being solid ACID compliant database backend, it was available as an offering AWS RDS service which reduced the management overhead of us having to configure it ourselves. In order to reduce read load on the primary database we implemented an Elasticsearch layer for fast and scalable search operations. Synchronisation of these indexes was to be achieved through the use of Sidekiq's Redis based background workers on Amazon ElastiCache. Again the AWS solution here looked to be an easy way to keep our involvement in managing this part of the platform at a minimum. Allowing us to focus on our core business.

Rails ls was chosen for its ability to quickly get core functionality up and running, its MVC architecture and also its focus on Test Driven Development using RSpec and Selenium with Travis CI providing continual integration. We also liked Ruby for its terse, clean and elegant syntax. Though YMMV on that one!

Unicorn was chosen for its continual deployment and reputation as a reliable application server, nginx for its reputation as a fast and stable reverse-proxy. We also took advantage of the Amazon CloudFront CDN here to further improve performance by caching static assets globally.

We tried to strike a balance between having control over management and configuration of our core application with the convenience of being able to leverage AWS hosted services for ancillary functions (Amazon SES , Amazon SQS Amazon Route 53 all hosted securely inside Amazon VPC of course!).

Whilst there is some compromise here with potential vendor lock in, the tasks being performed by these ancillary services are no particularly specialised which should mitigate this risk. Furthermore we have already containerised the stack in our development using Docker environment, and looking to how best to bring this into production - potentially using Amazon EC2 Container Service

6 upvotes·49.6K views

Decision at ChecklyHQ about Amazon Route 53, JavaScript, Vue.js, Node.js, Heroku, Amazon EC2, Let's Encrypt, SAAS

Avatar of tim_nolet
Founder, Engineer & Dishwasher at Checkly ·

Let's Encrypt Amazon EC2 Heroku Node.js Vue.js JavaScript

We recently went through building and setting up free SSL for custom domains for our #SaaS customers. This feature is used for hosting public status pages and dashboards under the customers' own domain name.

We are in the #Node.js, #AWS and #Heroku world, but most of the things we learned are applicable to other stacks too.

The post linked goes into three things:

  1. Configuring the Let's Encrypt / ACME client called Greenlock.
  2. Getting DNS right on Amazon Route 53
  3. Actually determining what content to serve based on hostname.

All seem pretty straightforward, but there are gotcha's at each step.

Hope this helps other budding SaaS operators or ops peeps that need this functionality.

6 upvotes·6K views

Decision at CloudvCard about AWS CloudFormation, Amazon CloudFront, Amazon Route 53, CloudFlare

Avatar of bramzor
Founder at CloudvCard ·

Yesterday we moved away from using CloudFlare towards Amazon Route 53 for a few reasons. Although CloudFlare is a great platform, once you reach almost a 100% AWS Service integration, it makes it hard to still use CloudFlare in the stack. Also being able to use Aliases for DNS makes it faster because instead of doing a CNAME and an A record lookup, you will be able to receive the A records from the end services directly. We always loved working with CloudFlare , especially for DNS as we already used Amazon CloudFront for CDN. But having everything within AWS makes it "cleaner" when deploying automatically using AWS CloudFormation. All that aside, the main reason for moving towards Amazon Route 53 for DNS is the ability to do geolocation and latency based DNS responses. Doing this outside the AWS console would increase the complexity.

5 upvotes·2.2K views

Decision at Kalibrr about Amazon Route 53

Avatar of TimDumol
Lead Software Architect at Kalibrr ·

Amazon Route 53 is a convenient way to manage our DNS routes. We just use the web UI for now, since we don't have any complex DNS setups. Amazon Route 53

1 upvote·2.1K views

Decision at Promethean TV about Amazon Route 53

Avatar of OneReality
CTO at Promethean TV ·

PrometheanTV utilizes the Amazon Route 53 service to manage various domains utilized by the products and services. Amazon Route 53

1 upvote·1.4K views

Decision at Goyoboard about Amazon Route 53

Avatar of azureru
Senior Software Engineer at Appsindo Technology ·

We utilize it as main DNS for fron-tend servers, Dynamic DNS for internal VPCS and simple signal flag storage for autoscaled instances Amazon Route 53

1 upvote·800 views

Decision about Amazon Route 53

Avatar of v0lkan
Chief Executive Philosopher at volkan.io ·

Since most of zerotoherojs.com infrastructure is on AWS, Route53 is the obvious DNS of choice.

I’m also considering CloudFlare, but haven’t decided the pros and cons of migrating yet. Amazon Route 53

1 upvote·364 views