9.8K
8K
+ 1
2.7K

What is Atom?

At GitHub, we're building the text editor we've always wanted. A tool you can customize to do anything, but also use productively on the first day without ever touching a config file. Atom is modern, approachable, and hackable to the core. We can't wait to see what you build with it.
Atom is a tool in the Text Editor category of a tech stack.
Atom is an open source tool with 52.3K GitHub stars and 14.8K GitHub forks. Here鈥檚 a link to Atom's open source repository on GitHub

Who uses Atom?

Companies
1112 companies reportedly use Atom in their tech stacks, including Lyft, GitHub, and Accenture.

Developers
8481 developers on StackShare have stated that they use Atom.

Atom Integrations

GitHub, TSLint, WakaTime, Kite, and cdnjs are some of the popular tools that integrate with Atom. Here's a list of all 22 tools that integrate with Atom.
Private Decisions at about Atom

Here are some stack decisions, common use cases and reviews by members of with Atom in their tech stack.

Dean Stringer
Dean Stringer
at Systemic Solutions | 6 upvotes 104.9K views

Have been a Visual Studio Code user since just after launch to the general public, having used the likes of Eclipse and Atom previously. Was amazed how mature it seemed off the bat and was super intrigued by the bootstrapped nature of it having been written/based on Electron/TypeScript, and of course being an open-source app from Microsoft. The features, plugin ecosystem and release frequency are very impressive. I do dev work on both Mac and Windows and don't use anything else now as far as IDEs go.

See more
Jerome Dalbert
Jerome Dalbert
Senior Backend Engineer at StackShare | 12 upvotes 247.4K views

I liked Sublime Text for its speed, simplicity and keyboard shortcuts which synergize well when working on scripting languages like Ruby and JavaScript. I extended the editor with custom Python scripts that improved keyboard navigability such as autofocusing the sidebar when no files are open, or changing tab closing behavior.

But customization can only get you so far, and there were little things that I still had to use the mouse for, such as scrolling, repositioning lines on the screen, selecting the line number of a failing test stack trace from a separate plugin pane, etc. After 3 years of wearily moving my arm and hand to perform the same repetitive tasks, I decided to switch to Vim for 3 reasons:

  • your fingers literally don鈥檛 ever need to leave the keyboard home row (I had to remap the escape key though)
  • it is a reliable tool that has been around for more than 30 years and will still be around for the next 30 years
  • I wanted to "look like a hacker" by doing everything inside my terminal and by becoming a better Unix citizen

The learning curve is very steep and it took me a year to master it, but investing time to be truly comfortable with my #TextEditor was more than worth it. To me, Vim comes close to being the perfect editor and I probably won鈥檛 need to switch ever again. It feels good to ignore new editors that come out every few years, like Atom and Visual Studio Code.

See more
Shared insights
on
AtomAtom

My GO editor Atom

See more
Andrea Catalucci
Andrea Catalucci
Software Developer at Unruly | 1 upvotes 0 views
Shared insights
on
AtomAtom

Coding frontend Atom

See more
Ted O'Meara
Ted O'Meara
CTO at GitHub | 1 upvotes 558 views
Shared insights
on
AtomAtom

We built Atom, and continue to build it with a group of outstanding open source contributors. Atom

See more
Rocky Gray
Rocky Gray
Software Engineer | 1 upvotes 0 views
Shared insights
on
AtomAtom

Editing code and writing documentation (markdown support). Atom

See more
Public Decisions about Atom

Here are some stack decisions, common use cases and reviews by companies and developers who chose Atom in their tech stack.

Jerome Dalbert
Jerome Dalbert
Senior Backend Engineer at StackShare | 12 upvotes 247.4K views

I liked Sublime Text for its speed, simplicity and keyboard shortcuts which synergize well when working on scripting languages like Ruby and JavaScript. I extended the editor with custom Python scripts that improved keyboard navigability such as autofocusing the sidebar when no files are open, or changing tab closing behavior.

But customization can only get you so far, and there were little things that I still had to use the mouse for, such as scrolling, repositioning lines on the screen, selecting the line number of a failing test stack trace from a separate plugin pane, etc. After 3 years of wearily moving my arm and hand to perform the same repetitive tasks, I decided to switch to Vim for 3 reasons:

  • your fingers literally don鈥檛 ever need to leave the keyboard home row (I had to remap the escape key though)
  • it is a reliable tool that has been around for more than 30 years and will still be around for the next 30 years
  • I wanted to "look like a hacker" by doing everything inside my terminal and by becoming a better Unix citizen

The learning curve is very steep and it took me a year to master it, but investing time to be truly comfortable with my #TextEditor was more than worth it. To me, Vim comes close to being the perfect editor and I probably won鈥檛 need to switch ever again. It feels good to ignore new editors that come out every few years, like Atom and Visual Studio Code.

See more
Julian Sanchez
Julian Sanchez
Lead Developer at Chore Champion | 9 upvotes 172.9K views

We use Visual Studio Code because it allows us to easily and quickly integrate with Git, much like Sublime Merge ,but it is integrated into the IDE. Another cool part about VS Code is the ability collaborate with each other with Visual Studio Live Share which allows our whole team to get more done together. It brings the convenience of the Google Suite to programming, offering something that works more smoothly than anything found on Atom or Sublime Text

See more
Justin Dorfman
Justin Dorfman
Developer Evangelist at StackShare | 8 upvotes 24.9K views
Shared insights
on
Visual Studio CodeVisual Studio CodeAtomAtom

A few months ago, I decided I would try Visual Studio Code. I resisted for so long because I knew I would love it and would then have to find alternative extensions for the ones I have installed in Atom. Fast forward to today and I'm kicking myself for not doing it sooner.

Extensions that I use:

What VSCode extensions do you use? 馃憞

See more

More than year ago I was looking for the best editor of Angular 2 application and I've tried Visual Studio Code and Atom. Atom had performance issues that put me off completely to use it again. Visual Studio Code became my main editor #Typescript files (and partly editor of #Java files). I'm happy with Visual Studio Code and I've never look back on Atom. There wasn't any reason to try Atom again, because Visual Studio Code fulfills my requirements very well. I use it for editing of TypeScript, #HTML, #Sass, JSON, Docker and Markdown.

See more
Dean Stringer
Dean Stringer
at Systemic Solutions | 6 upvotes 104.9K views

Have been a Visual Studio Code user since just after launch to the general public, having used the likes of Eclipse and Atom previously. Was amazed how mature it seemed off the bat and was super intrigued by the bootstrapped nature of it having been written/based on Electron/TypeScript, and of course being an open-source app from Microsoft. The features, plugin ecosystem and release frequency are very impressive. I do dev work on both Mac and Windows and don't use anything else now as far as IDEs go.

See more
Kyle Maune
Kyle Maune
Software Engineer at Cooper Aerial | 6 upvotes 23.6K views
Shared insights
on
AtomAtomVisual Studio CodeVisual Studio Code

I use Atom because it's been around long enough to have plugins for everything. It is very unlikely that there isn鈥檛 a plugin for your favorite language. It鈥檚 super easy to install plugins and packages (or to write your own!). The editor defaults are great: it鈥檚 the best default setup I鈥檝e ever seen for a text editor. One can download this thing and get working immediately.

At the end of the day, most modern text editors are great. I do love Visual Studio Code as well! I often find myself switching between the two for no other reason other than just because.

See more

Atom's Features

  • Atom is a desktop application based on web technologies
  • Node.js integration
  • Modular Design- composed of over 50 open-source packages that integrate around a minimal core
  • File system browser
  • Fuzzy finder for quickly opening files
  • Fast project-wide search and replace
  • Multiple cursors and selections
  • Multiple panes
  • Snippets
  • Code folding
  • A clean preferences UI
  • Import TextMate grammars and themes

Atom Alternatives & Comparisons

What are some alternatives to Atom?
Sublime Text
Sublime Text is available for OS X, Windows and Linux. One license is all you need to use Sublime Text on every computer you own, no matter what operating system it uses. Sublime Text uses a custom UI toolkit, optimized for speed and beauty, while taking advantage of native functionality on each platform.
Visual Studio Code
Build and debug modern web and cloud applications. Code is free and available on your favorite platform - Linux, Mac OSX, and Windows.
Brackets
With focused visual tools and preprocessor support, it is a modern text editor that makes it easy to design in the browser.
cell
cell is a self-constructing web app framework powered by a self-driving DOM. Learning cell is mostly about understanding how cell works, and not about how to use and memorize some API methods, because there is no API.
Element
Element is a Vue 2.0 based component library for developers, designers and product managers, with a set of design resources.
See all alternatives

Atom's Followers
8009 developers follow Atom to keep up with related blogs and decisions.
Jaeson Kim
saad ibrahim
Gelar Rustiawan
Jacob Garcia
arBuldu
Daniel Venegas
Alex Averin
Pau EM
Jun Chung
Ivan Kesegi膰