Alternatives to Event Store logo

Alternatives to Event Store

Kafka, MongoDB, Cassandra, RabbitMQ, and MySQL are the most popular alternatives and competitors to Event Store.
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What is Event Store and what are its top alternatives?

It stores your data as a series of immutable events over time, making it easy to build event-sourced applications. It can run as a cluster of nodes containing the same data, which remains available for writes provided at least half the nodes are alive and connected.
Event Store is a tool in the Databases category of a tech stack.
Event Store is an open source tool with 4.4K GitHub stars and 606 GitHub forks. Here’s a link to Event Store's open source repository on GitHub

Top Alternatives to Event Store

  • Kafka

    Kafka

    Kafka is a distributed, partitioned, replicated commit log service. It provides the functionality of a messaging system, but with a unique design. ...

  • MongoDB

    MongoDB

    MongoDB stores data in JSON-like documents that can vary in structure, offering a dynamic, flexible schema. MongoDB was also designed for high availability and scalability, with built-in replication and auto-sharding. ...

  • Cassandra

    Cassandra

    Partitioning means that Cassandra can distribute your data across multiple machines in an application-transparent matter. Cassandra will automatically repartition as machines are added and removed from the cluster. Row store means that like relational databases, Cassandra organizes data by rows and columns. The Cassandra Query Language (CQL) is a close relative of SQL. ...

  • RabbitMQ

    RabbitMQ

    RabbitMQ gives your applications a common platform to send and receive messages, and your messages a safe place to live until received. ...

  • MySQL

    MySQL

    The MySQL software delivers a very fast, multi-threaded, multi-user, and robust SQL (Structured Query Language) database server. MySQL Server is intended for mission-critical, heavy-load production systems as well as for embedding into mass-deployed software. ...

  • PostgreSQL

    PostgreSQL

    PostgreSQL is an advanced object-relational database management system that supports an extended subset of the SQL standard, including transactions, foreign keys, subqueries, triggers, user-defined types and functions. ...

  • Microsoft SQL Server

    Microsoft SQL Server

    Microsoft® SQL Server is a database management and analysis system for e-commerce, line-of-business, and data warehousing solutions. ...

  • SQLite

    SQLite

    SQLite is an embedded SQL database engine. Unlike most other SQL databases, SQLite does not have a separate server process. SQLite reads and writes directly to ordinary disk files. A complete SQL database with multiple tables, indices, triggers, and views, is contained in a single disk file. ...

Event Store alternatives & related posts

Kafka logo

Kafka

16.3K
15.5K
573
Distributed, fault tolerant, high throughput pub-sub messaging system
16.3K
15.5K
+ 1
573
PROS OF KAFKA
  • 122
    High-throughput
  • 116
    Distributed
  • 87
    Scalable
  • 81
    High-Performance
  • 65
    Durable
  • 36
    Publish-Subscribe
  • 19
    Simple-to-use
  • 15
    Open source
  • 10
    Written in Scala and java. Runs on JVM
  • 6
    Message broker + Streaming system
  • 4
    Avro schema integration
  • 2
    Suport Multiple clients
  • 2
    Robust
  • 2
    KSQL
  • 2
    Partioned, replayable log
  • 1
    Fun
  • 1
    Extremely good parallelism constructs
  • 1
    Simple publisher / multi-subscriber model
  • 1
    Flexible
CONS OF KAFKA
  • 27
    Non-Java clients are second-class citizens
  • 26
    Needs Zookeeper
  • 7
    Operational difficulties
  • 2
    Terrible Packaging

related Kafka posts

Eric Colson
Chief Algorithms Officer at Stitch Fix · | 21 upvotes · 2.1M views

The algorithms and data infrastructure at Stitch Fix is housed in #AWS. Data acquisition is split between events flowing through Kafka, and periodic snapshots of PostgreSQL DBs. We store data in an Amazon S3 based data warehouse. Apache Spark on Yarn is our tool of choice for data movement and #ETL. Because our storage layer (s3) is decoupled from our processing layer, we are able to scale our compute environment very elastically. We have several semi-permanent, autoscaling Yarn clusters running to serve our data processing needs. While the bulk of our compute infrastructure is dedicated to algorithmic processing, we also implemented Presto for adhoc queries and dashboards.

Beyond data movement and ETL, most #ML centric jobs (e.g. model training and execution) run in a similarly elastic environment as containers running Python and R code on Amazon EC2 Container Service clusters. The execution of batch jobs on top of ECS is managed by Flotilla, a service we built in house and open sourced (see https://github.com/stitchfix/flotilla-os).

At Stitch Fix, algorithmic integrations are pervasive across the business. We have dozens of data products actively integrated systems. That requires serving layer that is robust, agile, flexible, and allows for self-service. Models produced on Flotilla are packaged for deployment in production using Khan, another framework we've developed internally. Khan provides our data scientists the ability to quickly productionize those models they've developed with open source frameworks in Python 3 (e.g. PyTorch, sklearn), by automatically packaging them as Docker containers and deploying to Amazon ECS. This provides our data scientist a one-click method of getting from their algorithms to production. We then integrate those deployments into a service mesh, which allows us to A/B test various implementations in our product.

For more info:

#DataScience #DataStack #Data

See more
John Kodumal

As we've evolved or added additional infrastructure to our stack, we've biased towards managed services. Most new backing stores are Amazon RDS instances now. We do use self-managed PostgreSQL with TimescaleDB for time-series data—this is made HA with the use of Patroni and Consul.

We also use managed Amazon ElastiCache instances instead of spinning up Amazon EC2 instances to run Redis workloads, as well as shifting to Amazon Kinesis instead of Kafka.

See more
MongoDB logo

MongoDB

66.8K
56.2K
4.1K
The database for giant ideas
66.8K
56.2K
+ 1
4.1K
PROS OF MONGODB
  • 826
    Document-oriented storage
  • 591
    No sql
  • 548
    Ease of use
  • 465
    Fast
  • 407
    High performance
  • 256
    Free
  • 215
    Open source
  • 180
    Flexible
  • 143
    Replication & high availability
  • 110
    Easy to maintain
  • 42
    Querying
  • 38
    Easy scalability
  • 37
    Auto-sharding
  • 36
    High availability
  • 31
    Map/reduce
  • 27
    Document database
  • 25
    Full index support
  • 25
    Easy setup
  • 16
    Reliable
  • 15
    Fast in-place updates
  • 14
    Agile programming, flexible, fast
  • 12
    No database migrations
  • 8
    Enterprise
  • 8
    Easy integration with Node.Js
  • 6
    Enterprise Support
  • 5
    Great NoSQL DB
  • 3
    Drivers support is good
  • 3
    Aggregation Framework
  • 3
    Support for many languages through different drivers
  • 2
    Awesome
  • 2
    Schemaless
  • 2
    Managed service
  • 2
    Fast
  • 2
    Easy to Scale
  • 1
    Consistent
  • 1
    Acid Compliant
CONS OF MONGODB
  • 5
    Very slowly for connected models that require joins
  • 3
    Not acid compliant
  • 1
    Proprietary query language

related MongoDB posts

Jeyabalaji Subramanian

Recently we were looking at a few robust and cost-effective ways of replicating the data that resides in our production MongoDB to a PostgreSQL database for data warehousing and business intelligence.

We set ourselves the following criteria for the optimal tool that would do this job: - The data replication must be near real-time, yet it should NOT impact the production database - The data replication must be horizontally scalable (based on the load), asynchronous & crash-resilient

Based on the above criteria, we selected the following tools to perform the end to end data replication:

We chose MongoDB Stitch for picking up the changes in the source database. It is the serverless platform from MongoDB. One of the services offered by MongoDB Stitch is Stitch Triggers. Using stitch triggers, you can execute a serverless function (in Node.js) in real time in response to changes in the database. When there are a lot of database changes, Stitch automatically "feeds forward" these changes through an asynchronous queue.

We chose Amazon SQS as the pipe / message backbone for communicating the changes from MongoDB to our own replication service. Interestingly enough, MongoDB stitch offers integration with AWS services.

In the Node.js function, we wrote minimal functionality to communicate the database changes (insert / update / delete / replace) to Amazon SQS.

Next we wrote a minimal micro-service in Python to listen to the message events on SQS, pickup the data payload & mirror the DB changes on to the target Data warehouse. We implemented source data to target data translation by modelling target table structures through SQLAlchemy . We deployed this micro-service as AWS Lambda with Zappa. With Zappa, deploying your services as event-driven & horizontally scalable Lambda service is dumb-easy.

In the end, we got to implement a highly scalable near realtime Change Data Replication service that "works" and deployed to production in a matter of few days!

See more
Robert Zuber

We use MongoDB as our primary #datastore. Mongo's approach to replica sets enables some fantastic patterns for operations like maintenance, backups, and #ETL.

As we pull #microservices from our #monolith, we are taking the opportunity to build them with their own datastores using PostgreSQL. We also use Redis to cache data we’d never store permanently, and to rate-limit our requests to partners’ APIs (like GitHub).

When we’re dealing with large blobs of immutable data (logs, artifacts, and test results), we store them in Amazon S3. We handle any side-effects of S3’s eventual consistency model within our own code. This ensures that we deal with user requests correctly while writes are in process.

See more
Cassandra logo

Cassandra

3.2K
3.2K
492
A partitioned row store. Rows are organized into tables with a required primary key.
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3.2K
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PROS OF CASSANDRA
  • 114
    Distributed
  • 95
    High performance
  • 80
    High availability
  • 74
    Easy scalability
  • 52
    Replication
  • 26
    Multi datacenter deployments
  • 26
    Reliable
  • 8
    OLTP
  • 7
    Open source
  • 7
    Schema optional
  • 2
    Workload separation (via MDC)
  • 1
    Fast
CONS OF CASSANDRA
  • 2
    Reliability of replication
  • 1
    Updates

related Cassandra posts

Thierry Schellenbach
Shared insights
on
RedisRedisCassandraCassandraRocksDBRocksDB
at

1.0 of Stream leveraged Cassandra for storing the feed. Cassandra is a common choice for building feeds. Instagram, for instance started, out with Redis but eventually switched to Cassandra to handle their rapid usage growth. Cassandra can handle write heavy workloads very efficiently.

Cassandra is a great tool that allows you to scale write capacity simply by adding more nodes, though it is also very complex. This complexity made it hard to diagnose performance fluctuations. Even though we had years of experience with running Cassandra, it still felt like a bit of a black box. When building Stream 2.0 we decided to go for a different approach and build Keevo. Keevo is our in-house key-value store built upon RocksDB, gRPC and Raft.

RocksDB is a highly performant embeddable database library developed and maintained by Facebook’s data engineering team. RocksDB started as a fork of Google’s LevelDB that introduced several performance improvements for SSD. Nowadays RocksDB is a project on its own and is under active development. It is written in C++ and it’s fast. Have a look at how this benchmark handles 7 million QPS. In terms of technology it’s much more simple than Cassandra.

This translates into reduced maintenance overhead, improved performance and, most importantly, more consistent performance. It’s interesting to note that LinkedIn also uses RocksDB for their feed.

#InMemoryDatabases #DataStores #Databases

See more
Umair Iftikhar
Technical Architect at ERP Studio · | 3 upvotes · 160.9K views

Developing a solution that collects Telemetry Data from different devices, nearly 1000 devices minimum and maximum 12000. Each device is sending 2 packets in 1 second. This is time-series data, and this data definition and different reports are saved on PostgreSQL. Like Building information, maintenance records, etc. I want to know about the best solution. This data is required for Math and ML to run different algorithms. Also, data is raw without definitions and information stored in PostgreSQL. Initially, I went with TimescaleDB due to PostgreSQL support, but to increase in sites, I started facing many issues with timescale DB in terms of flexibility of storing data.

My major requirement is also the replication of the database for reporting and different purposes. You may also suggest other options other than Druid and Cassandra. But an open source solution is appreciated.

See more
RabbitMQ logo

RabbitMQ

15.3K
13.3K
518
Open source multiprotocol messaging broker
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518
PROS OF RABBITMQ
  • 229
    It's fast and it works with good metrics/monitoring
  • 79
    Ease of configuration
  • 58
    I like the admin interface
  • 50
    Easy to set-up and start with
  • 20
    Durable
  • 18
    Intuitive work through python
  • 18
    Standard protocols
  • 10
    Written primarily in Erlang
  • 8
    Simply superb
  • 6
    Completeness of messaging patterns
  • 3
    Scales to 1 million messages per second
  • 3
    Reliable
  • 2
    Better than most traditional queue based message broker
  • 2
    Distributed
  • 2
    Supports AMQP
  • 1
    Inubit Integration
  • 1
    Supports MQTT
  • 1
    Runs on Open Telecom Platform
  • 1
    High performance
  • 1
    Reliability
  • 1
    Clusterable
  • 1
    Clear documentation with different scripting language
  • 1
    Great ui
  • 1
    Better routing system
  • 1
    Delayed messages
CONS OF RABBITMQ
  • 9
    Too complicated cluster/HA config and management
  • 6
    Needs Erlang runtime. Need ops good with Erlang runtime
  • 5
    Configuration must be done first, not by your code
  • 4
    Slow

related RabbitMQ posts

James Cunningham
Operations Engineer at Sentry · | 18 upvotes · 1.3M views
Shared insights
on
CeleryCeleryRabbitMQRabbitMQ
at

As Sentry runs throughout the day, there are about 50 different offline tasks that we execute—anything from “process this event, pretty please” to “send all of these cool people some emails.” There are some that we execute once a day and some that execute thousands per second.

Managing this variety requires a reliably high-throughput message-passing technology. We use Celery's RabbitMQ implementation, and we stumbled upon a great feature called Federation that allows us to partition our task queue across any number of RabbitMQ servers and gives us the confidence that, if any single server gets backlogged, others will pitch in and distribute some of the backlogged tasks to their consumers.

#MessageQueue

See more
Yogesh Bhondekar
Co-Founder at weconnect.chat · | 15 upvotes · 117.7K views

Hi, I am building an enhanced web-conferencing app that will have a voice/video call, live chats, live notifications, live discussions, screen sharing, etc features. Ref: Zoom.

I need advise finalizing the tech stack for this app. I am considering below tech stack:

  • Frontend: React
  • Backend: Node.js
  • Database: MongoDB
  • IAAS: #AWS
  • Containers & Orchestration: Docker / Kubernetes
  • DevOps: GitLab, Terraform
  • Brokers: Redis / RabbitMQ

I need advice at the platform level as to what could be considered to support concurrent video streaming seamlessly.

Also, please suggest what could be a better tech stack for my app?

#SAAS #VideoConferencing #WebAndVideoConferencing #zoom #stack

See more
MySQL logo

MySQL

88.1K
72K
3.7K
The world's most popular open source database
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72K
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PROS OF MYSQL
  • 793
    Sql
  • 673
    Free
  • 556
    Easy
  • 527
    Widely used
  • 485
    Open source
  • 180
    High availability
  • 160
    Cross-platform support
  • 104
    Great community
  • 78
    Secure
  • 75
    Full-text indexing and searching
  • 25
    Fast, open, available
  • 14
    SSL support
  • 13
    Reliable
  • 13
    Robust
  • 8
    Enterprise Version
  • 7
    Easy to set up on all platforms
  • 2
    NoSQL access to JSON data type
  • 1
    Relational database
  • 1
    Easy, light, scalable
  • 1
    Sequel Pro (best SQL GUI)
  • 1
    Replica Support
CONS OF MYSQL
  • 14
    Owned by a company with their own agenda
  • 1
    Can't roll back schema changes

related MySQL posts

Tim Abbott

We've been using PostgreSQL since the very early days of Zulip, but we actually didn't use it from the beginning. Zulip started out as a MySQL project back in 2012, because we'd heard it was a good choice for a startup with a wide community. However, we found that even though we were using the Django ORM for most of our database access, we spent a lot of time fighting with MySQL. Issues ranged from bad collation defaults, to bad query plans which required a lot of manual query tweaks.

We ended up getting so frustrated that we tried out PostgresQL, and the results were fantastic. We didn't have to do any real customization (just some tuning settings for how big a server we had), and all of our most important queries were faster out of the box. As a result, we were able to delete a bunch of custom queries escaping the ORM that we'd written to make the MySQL query planner happy (because postgres just did the right thing automatically).

And then after that, we've just gotten a ton of value out of postgres. We use its excellent built-in full-text search, which has helped us avoid needing to bring in a tool like Elasticsearch, and we've really enjoyed features like its partial indexes, which saved us a lot of work adding unnecessary extra tables to get good performance for things like our "unread messages" and "starred messages" indexes.

I can't recommend it highly enough.

See more
Conor Myhrvold
Tech Brand Mgr, Office of CTO at Uber · | 21 upvotes · 1.1M views

Our most popular (& controversial!) article to date on the Uber Engineering blog in 3+ yrs. Why we moved from PostgreSQL to MySQL. In essence, it was due to a variety of limitations of Postgres at the time. Fun fact -- earlier in Uber's history we'd actually moved from MySQL to Postgres before switching back for good, & though we published the article in Summer 2016 we haven't looked back since:

The early architecture of Uber consisted of a monolithic backend application written in Python that used Postgres for data persistence. Since that time, the architecture of Uber has changed significantly, to a model of microservices and new data platforms. Specifically, in many of the cases where we previously used Postgres, we now use Schemaless, a novel database sharding layer built on top of MySQL (https://eng.uber.com/schemaless-part-one/). In this article, we’ll explore some of the drawbacks we found with Postgres and explain the decision to build Schemaless and other backend services on top of MySQL:

https://eng.uber.com/mysql-migration/

See more
PostgreSQL logo

PostgreSQL

67.3K
54.7K
3.5K
A powerful, open source object-relational database system
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PROS OF POSTGRESQL
  • 755
    Relational database
  • 508
    High availability
  • 436
    Enterprise class database
  • 380
    Sql
  • 302
    Sql + nosql
  • 171
    Great community
  • 145
    Easy to setup
  • 129
    Heroku
  • 128
    Secure by default
  • 111
    Postgis
  • 48
    Supports Key-Value
  • 46
    Great JSON support
  • 32
    Cross platform
  • 30
    Extensible
  • 26
    Replication
  • 24
    Triggers
  • 22
    Rollback
  • 21
    Multiversion concurrency control
  • 20
    Open source
  • 17
    Heroku Add-on
  • 14
    Stable, Simple and Good Performance
  • 13
    Powerful
  • 12
    Lets be serious, what other SQL DB would you go for?
  • 9
    Good documentation
  • 7
    Intelligent optimizer
  • 7
    Scalable
  • 6
    Reliable
  • 6
    Transactional DDL
  • 6
    Modern
  • 5
    Free
  • 5
    One stop solution for all things sql no matter the os
  • 4
    Relational database with MVCC
  • 3
    Faster Development
  • 3
    Full-Text Search
  • 3
    Developer friendly
  • 2
    Excellent source code
  • 2
    Great DB for Transactional system or Application
  • 2
    search
  • 1
    Free version
  • 1
    Open-source
  • 1
    Full-text
  • 1
    Text
CONS OF POSTGRESQL
  • 9
    Table/index bloatings

related PostgreSQL posts

Jeyabalaji Subramanian

Recently we were looking at a few robust and cost-effective ways of replicating the data that resides in our production MongoDB to a PostgreSQL database for data warehousing and business intelligence.

We set ourselves the following criteria for the optimal tool that would do this job: - The data replication must be near real-time, yet it should NOT impact the production database - The data replication must be horizontally scalable (based on the load), asynchronous & crash-resilient

Based on the above criteria, we selected the following tools to perform the end to end data replication:

We chose MongoDB Stitch for picking up the changes in the source database. It is the serverless platform from MongoDB. One of the services offered by MongoDB Stitch is Stitch Triggers. Using stitch triggers, you can execute a serverless function (in Node.js) in real time in response to changes in the database. When there are a lot of database changes, Stitch automatically "feeds forward" these changes through an asynchronous queue.

We chose Amazon SQS as the pipe / message backbone for communicating the changes from MongoDB to our own replication service. Interestingly enough, MongoDB stitch offers integration with AWS services.

In the Node.js function, we wrote minimal functionality to communicate the database changes (insert / update / delete / replace) to Amazon SQS.

Next we wrote a minimal micro-service in Python to listen to the message events on SQS, pickup the data payload & mirror the DB changes on to the target Data warehouse. We implemented source data to target data translation by modelling target table structures through SQLAlchemy . We deployed this micro-service as AWS Lambda with Zappa. With Zappa, deploying your services as event-driven & horizontally scalable Lambda service is dumb-easy.

In the end, we got to implement a highly scalable near realtime Change Data Replication service that "works" and deployed to production in a matter of few days!

See more
Tim Abbott

We've been using PostgreSQL since the very early days of Zulip, but we actually didn't use it from the beginning. Zulip started out as a MySQL project back in 2012, because we'd heard it was a good choice for a startup with a wide community. However, we found that even though we were using the Django ORM for most of our database access, we spent a lot of time fighting with MySQL. Issues ranged from bad collation defaults, to bad query plans which required a lot of manual query tweaks.

We ended up getting so frustrated that we tried out PostgresQL, and the results were fantastic. We didn't have to do any real customization (just some tuning settings for how big a server we had), and all of our most important queries were faster out of the box. As a result, we were able to delete a bunch of custom queries escaping the ORM that we'd written to make the MySQL query planner happy (because postgres just did the right thing automatically).

And then after that, we've just gotten a ton of value out of postgres. We use its excellent built-in full-text search, which has helped us avoid needing to bring in a tool like Elasticsearch, and we've really enjoyed features like its partial indexes, which saved us a lot of work adding unnecessary extra tables to get good performance for things like our "unread messages" and "starred messages" indexes.

I can't recommend it highly enough.

See more
Microsoft SQL Server logo

Microsoft SQL Server

13.4K
10.1K
536
A relational database management system developed by Microsoft
13.4K
10.1K
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536
PROS OF MICROSOFT SQL SERVER
  • 138
    Reliable and easy to use
  • 101
    High performance
  • 94
    Great with .net
  • 65
    Works well with .net
  • 56
    Easy to maintain
  • 21
    Azure support
  • 17
    Always on
  • 17
    Full Index Support
  • 10
    Enterprise manager is fantastic
  • 9
    In-Memory OLTP Engine
  • 2
    Security is forefront
  • 1
    Columnstore indexes
  • 1
    Great documentation
  • 1
    Faster Than Oracle
  • 1
    Decent management tools
  • 1
    Easy to setup and configure
  • 1
    Docker Delivery
CONS OF MICROSOFT SQL SERVER
  • 4
    Expensive Licensing
  • 2
    Microsoft

related Microsoft SQL Server posts

We initially started out with Heroku as our PaaS provider due to a desire to use it by our original developer for our Ruby on Rails application/website at the time. We were finding response times slow, it was painfully slow, sometimes taking 10 seconds to start loading the main page. Moving up to the next "compute" level was going to be very expensive.

We moved our site over to AWS Elastic Beanstalk , not only did response times on the site practically become instant, our cloud bill for the application was cut in half.

In database world we are currently using Amazon RDS for PostgreSQL also, we have both MariaDB and Microsoft SQL Server both hosted on Amazon RDS. The plan is to migrate to AWS Aurora Serverless for all 3 of those database systems.

Additional services we use for our public applications: AWS Lambda, Python, Redis, Memcached, AWS Elastic Load Balancing (ELB), Amazon Elasticsearch Service, Amazon ElastiCache

See more

I am a Microsoft SQL Server programmer who is a bit out of practice. I have been asked to assist on a new project. The overall purpose is to organize a large number of recordings so that they can be searched. I have an enormous music library but my songs are several hours long. I need to include things like time, date and location of the recording. I don't have a problem with the general database design. I have two primary questions:

  1. I need to use either MySQL or PostgreSQL on a Linux based OS. Which would be better for this application?
  2. I have not dealt with a sound based data type before. How do I store that and put it in a table? Thank you.
See more
SQLite logo

SQLite

12.6K
10.1K
528
A software library that implements a self-contained, serverless, zero-configuration, transactional SQL database engine
12.6K
10.1K
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528
PROS OF SQLITE
  • 160
    Lightweight
  • 134
    Portable
  • 121
    Simple
  • 80
    Sql
  • 28
    Preinstalled on iOS and Android
  • 2
    Tcl integration
  • 1
    Free
  • 1
    Telefon
  • 1
    Portable A database on my USB 'love it'
CONS OF SQLITE
  • 2
    Not for multi-process of multithreaded apps
  • 1
    Needs different binaries for each platform

related SQLite posts

Dimelo Waterson
Shared insights
on
PostgreSQLPostgreSQLMySQLMySQLSQLiteSQLite

I need to add a DBMS to my stack, but I don't know which. I'm tempted to learn SQLite since it would be useful to me with its focus on local access without concurrency. However, doing so feels like I would be defeating the purpose of trying to expand my skill set since it seems like most enterprise applications have the opposite requirements.

To be able to apply what I learn to more projects, what should I try to learn? MySQL? PostgreSQL? Something else? Is there a comfortable middle ground between high applicability and ease of use?

See more
Christian Stefanescu
Head of IT at lawpilots · | 3 upvotes · 19K views
Shared insights
on
DjangoDjangoSQLiteSQLitePostgreSQLPostgreSQL

While I love and use PostgreSQL , I would definitely recommend having a look at SQLite as well. It can be a solid database for lots of applications and it brings some advantages in terms of handling: you don't need a server running, which makes things like testing, deploying or backing up databases much easier. Through the ORM in Django you are one abstraction level away from your database anyway and switching later on is definitely an option, but I believe SQLite is very good for pretty much all the small applications you can think of.

See more