Alternatives to Lodash logo

Alternatives to Lodash

jQuery, Underscore, Ramda, ES6, and RxJS are the most popular alternatives and competitors to Lodash.
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What is Lodash and what are its top alternatives?

A JavaScript utility library delivering consistency, modularity, performance, & extras. It provides utility functions for common programming tasks using the functional programming paradigm.
Lodash is a tool in the Javascript Utilities & Libraries category of a tech stack.
Lodash is an open source tool with 51.4K GitHub stars and 6.1K GitHub forks. Here’s a link to Lodash's open source repository on GitHub

Top Alternatives to Lodash

  • jQuery

    jQuery

    jQuery is a cross-platform JavaScript library designed to simplify the client-side scripting of HTML. ...

  • Underscore

    Underscore

    A JavaScript library that provides a whole mess of useful functional programming helpers without extending any built-in objects. ...

  • Ramda

    Ramda

    It emphasizes a purer functional style. Immutability and side-effect free functions are at the heart of its design philosophy. This can help you get the job done with simple, elegant code. ...

  • ES6

    ES6

    Goals for ECMAScript 2015 include providing better support for large applications, library creation, and for use of ECMAScript as a compilation target for other languages. Some of its major enhancements include modules, class declarations, lexical block scoping, iterators and generators, promises for asynchronous programming, destructuring patterns, and proper tail calls. ...

  • RxJS

    RxJS

    RxJS is a library for reactive programming using Observables, to make it easier to compose asynchronous or callback-based code. This project is a rewrite of Reactive-Extensions/RxJS with better performance, better modularity, better debuggable call stacks, while staying mostly backwards compatible, with some breaking changes that reduce the API surface. ...

  • TypeScript

    TypeScript

    TypeScript is a language for application-scale JavaScript development. It's a typed superset of JavaScript that compiles to plain JavaScript. ...

  • Modernizr

    Modernizr

    It’s a collection of superfast tests or detects as we like to call them which run as your web page loads, then you can use the results to tailor the experience to the user. It tells you what HTML, CSS and JavaScript features the user’s browser has to offer. ...

  • Modernizr

    Modernizr

    It’s a collection of superfast tests or detects as we like to call them which run as your web page loads, then you can use the results to tailor the experience to the user. It tells you what HTML, CSS and JavaScript features the user’s browser has to offer. ...

Lodash alternatives & related posts

jQuery logo

jQuery

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6.5K
The Write Less, Do More, JavaScript Library.
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PROS OF JQUERY
  • 1.3K
    Cross-browser
  • 957
    Dom manipulation
  • 805
    Power
  • 660
    Open source
  • 610
    Plugins
  • 457
    Easy
  • 395
    Popular
  • 350
    Feature-rich
  • 281
    Html5
  • 227
    Light weight
  • 91
    Simple
  • 84
    Great community
  • 79
    CSS3 Compliant
  • 69
    Mobile friendly
  • 67
    Fast
  • 43
    Intuitive
  • 42
    Swiss Army knife for webdev
  • 35
    Huge Community
  • 10
    Easy to learn
  • 3
    Clean code
  • 2
    Just awesome
  • 2
    Powerful
  • 2
    Nice
  • 2
    Because of Ajax request :)
  • 1
    Easy Setup
  • 1
    Open Source, Simple, Easy Setup
  • 1
    It Just Works
  • 1
    Improves productivity
  • 1
    Industry acceptance
  • 1
    Allows great manipulation of HTML and CSS
  • 1
    Used everywhere
  • 1
    Widely Used
  • 0
    Javascript
CONS OF JQUERY
  • 5
    Large size
  • 5
    Encourages DOM as primary data source
  • 4
    Sometimes inconsistent API
  • 2
    Live events is overly complex feature

related jQuery posts

Kir Shatrov
Engineering Lead at Shopify · | 20 upvotes · 564K views

The client-side stack of Shopify Admin has been a long journey. It started with HTML templates, jQuery and Prototype. We moved to Batman.js, our in-house Single-Page-Application framework (SPA), in 2013. Then, we re-evaluated our approach and moved back to statically rendered HTML and vanilla JavaScript. As the front-end ecosystem matured, we felt that it was time to rethink our approach again. Last year, we started working on moving Shopify Admin to React and TypeScript.

Many things have changed since the days of jQuery and Batman. JavaScript execution is much faster. We can easily render our apps on the server to do less work on the client, and the resources and tooling for developers are substantially better with React than we ever had with Batman.

#FrameworksFullStack #Languages

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Ganesa Vijayakumar
Full Stack Coder | Module Lead · | 19 upvotes · 2.5M views

I'm planning to create a web application and also a mobile application to provide a very good shopping experience to the end customers. Shortly, my application will be aggregate the product details from difference sources and giving a clear picture to the user that when and where to buy that product with best in Quality and cost.

I have planned to develop this in many milestones for adding N number of features and I have picked my first part to complete the core part (aggregate the product details from different sources).

As per my work experience and knowledge, I have chosen the followings stacks to this mission.

UI: I would like to develop this application using React, React Router and React Native since I'm a little bit familiar on this and also most importantly these will help on developing both web and mobile apps. In addition, I'm gonna use the stacks JavaScript, jQuery, jQuery UI, jQuery Mobile, Bootstrap wherever required.

Service: I have planned to use Java as the main business layer language as I have 7+ years of experience on this I believe I can do better work using Java than other languages. In addition, I'm thinking to use the stacks Node.js.

Database and ORM: I'm gonna pick MySQL as DB and Hibernate as ORM since I have a piece of good knowledge and also work experience on this combination.

Search Engine: I need to deal with a large amount of product data and it's in-detailed info to provide enough details to end user at the same time I need to focus on the performance area too. so I have decided to use Solr as a search engine for product search and suggestions. In addition, I'm thinking to replace Solr by Elasticsearch once explored/reviewed enough about Elasticsearch.

Host: As of now, my plan to complete the application with decent features first and deploy it in a free hosting environment like Docker and Heroku and then once it is stable then I have planned to use the AWS products Amazon S3, EC2, Amazon RDS and Amazon Route 53. I'm not sure about Microsoft Azure that what is the specialty in it than Heroku and Amazon EC2 Container Service. Anyhow, I will do explore these once again and pick the best suite one for my requirement once I reached this level.

Build and Repositories: I have decided to choose Apache Maven and Git as these are my favorites and also so popular on respectively build and repositories.

Additional Utilities :) - I would like to choose Codacy for code review as their Startup plan will be very helpful to this application. I'm already experienced with Google CheckStyle and SonarQube even I'm looking something on Codacy.

Happy Coding! Suggestions are welcome! :)

Thanks, Ganesa

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Underscore logo

Underscore

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JavaScript's utility _ belt
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PROS OF UNDERSCORE
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    Utility
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    Simple
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    Functional programming
  • 32
    Fast
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    Open source
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    Backbone
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    Javascript
  • 8
    Annotated source code
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    Library
CONS OF UNDERSCORE
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    Ramda logo

    Ramda

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    A practical functional library for JavaScript programmers
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    PROS OF RAMDA
    • 2
      Automatically curried
    • 1
      Point free programming
    CONS OF RAMDA
      Be the first to leave a con

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      ES6 logo

      ES6

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      The next version of JavaScript
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      PROS OF ES6
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        ES6 code is shorter than traditional JS
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        Module System Standardized
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        Destructuring Assignment
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        Extremly compact
      CONS OF ES6
      • 1
        Suffers from baggage

      related ES6 posts

      Nick Parsons
      Director of Developer Marketing at Stream · | 35 upvotes · 1.4M views

      Winds 2.0 is an open source Podcast/RSS reader developed by Stream with a core goal to enable a wide range of developers to contribute.

      We chose JavaScript because nearly every developer knows or can, at the very least, read JavaScript. With ES6 and Node.js v10.x.x, it’s become a very capable language. Async/Await is powerful and easy to use (Async/Await vs Promises). Babel allows us to experiment with next-generation JavaScript (features that are not in the official JavaScript spec yet). Yarn allows us to consistently install packages quickly (and is filled with tons of new tricks)

      We’re using JavaScript for everything – both front and backend. Most of our team is experienced with Go and Python, so Node was not an obvious choice for this app.

      Sure... there will be haters who refuse to acknowledge that there is anything remotely positive about JavaScript (there are even rants on Hacker News about Node.js); however, without writing completely in JavaScript, we would not have seen the results we did.

      #FrameworksFullStack #Languages

      See more
      Ali Soueidan
      Creative Web Developer at Ali Soueidan · | 18 upvotes · 805.7K views

      Application and Data: Since my personal website ( https://alisoueidan.com ) is a SPA I've chosen to use Vue.js, as a framework to create it. After a short skeptical phase I immediately felt in love with the single file component concept! I also used vuex for state management, which makes working with several components, which are communicating with each other even more fun and convenient to use. Of course, using Vue requires using JavaScript as well, since it is the basis of it.

      For markup and style, I used Pug and Sass, since they’re the perfect match to me. I love the clean and strict syntax of both of them and even more that their structure is almost similar. Also, both of them come with an expanded functionality such as mixins, loops and so on related to their “siblings” (HTML and CSS). Both of them require nesting and prevent untidy code, which can be a huge advantage when working in teams. I used JSON to store data (since the data quantity on my website is moderate) – JSON works also good in combo with Pug, using for loops, based on the JSON Objects for example.

      To send my contact form I used PHP, since sending emails using PHP is still relatively convenient, simple and easy done.

      DevOps: Of course, I used Git to do my version management (which I even do in smaller projects like my website just have an additional backup of my code). On top of that I used GitHub since it now supports private repository for free accounts (which I am using for my own). I use Babel to use ES6 functionality such as arrow functions and so on, and still don’t losing cross browser compatibility.

      Side note: I used npm for package management. 🎉

      *Business Tools: * I use Asana to organize my project. This is a big advantage to me, even if I work alone, since “private” projects can get interrupted for some time. By using Asana I still know (even after month of not touching a project) what I’ve done, on which task I was at last working on and what still is to do. Working in Teams (for enterprise I’d take on Jira instead) of course Asana is a Tool which I really love to use as well. All the graphics on my website are SVG which I have created with Adobe Illustrator and adjusted within the SVG code or by using JavaScript or CSS (SASS).

      See more
      RxJS logo

      RxJS

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      The Reactive Extensions for JavaScript
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      PROS OF RXJS
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        Easier async data chaining and combining
      • 3
        Steep learning curve, but offers predictable operations
      • 2
        Ability to build your own stream
      • 2
        Works great with any state management implementation
      • 2
        Easier testing
      CONS OF RXJS
      • 2
        Steep learning curve

      related RxJS posts

      TypeScript logo

      TypeScript

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      A superset of JavaScript that compiles to clean JavaScript output
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      PROS OF TYPESCRIPT
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        More intuitive and type safe javascript
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        Type safe
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        JavaScript superset
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        The best AltJS ever
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        Best AltJS for BackEnd
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        Powerful type system, including generics & JS features
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        Nice and seamless hybrid of static and dynamic typing
      • 9
        Aligned with ES development for compatibility
      • 9
        Compile time errors
      • 6
        Structural, rather than nominal, subtyping
      • 5
        Angular
      • 3
        Starts and ends with JavaScript
      CONS OF TYPESCRIPT
      • 4
        Code may look heavy and confusing
      • 2
        Hype

      related TypeScript posts

      Yshay Yaacobi

      Our first experience with .NET core was when we developed our OSS feature management platform - Tweek (https://github.com/soluto/tweek). We wanted to create a solution that is able to run anywhere (super important for OSS), has excellent performance characteristics and can fit in a multi-container architecture. We decided to implement our rule engine processor in F# , our main service was implemented in C# and other components were built using JavaScript / TypeScript and Go.

      Visual Studio Code worked really well for us as well, it worked well with all our polyglot services and the .Net core integration had great cross-platform developer experience (to be fair, F# was a bit trickier) - actually, each of our team members used a different OS (Ubuntu, macos, windows). Our production deployment ran for a time on Docker Swarm until we've decided to adopt Kubernetes with almost seamless migration process.

      After our positive experience of running .Net core workloads in containers and developing Tweek's .Net services on non-windows machines, C# had gained back some of its popularity (originally lost to Node.js), and other teams have been using it for developing microservices, k8s sidecars (like https://github.com/Soluto/airbag), cli tools, serverless functions and other projects...

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      Adebayo Akinlaja
      Engineering Manager at Andela · | 26 upvotes · 788.8K views

      I picked up an idea to develop and it was no brainer I had to go with React for the frontend. I was faced with challenges when it came to what component framework to use. I had worked extensively with Material-UI but I needed something different that would offer me wider range of well customized components (I became pretty slow at styling). I brought in Evergreen after several sampling and reads online but again, after several prototype development against Evergreen—since I was using TypeScript and I had to import custom Type, it felt exhaustive. After I validated Evergreen with the designs of the idea I was developing, I also noticed I might have to do a lot of styling. I later stumbled on Material Kit, the one specifically made for React . It was promising with beautifully crafted components, most of which fits into the designs pages I had on ground.

      A major problem of Material Kit for me is it isn't written in TypeScript and there isn't any plans to support its TypeScript version. I rolled up my sleeve and started converting their components to TypeScript and if you'll ask me, I am still on it.

      In summary, I used the Create React App with TypeScript support and I am spending some time converting Material Kit to TypeScript before I start developing against it. All of these components are going to be hosted on Bit.

      If you feel I am crazy or I have gotten something wrong, I'll be willing to listen to your opinion. Also, if you want to have a share of whatever TypeScript version of Material Kit I end up coming up with, let me know.

      See more
      Modernizr logo

      Modernizr

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      Respond to your user’s browser features
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      PROS OF MODERNIZR
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        CONS OF MODERNIZR
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          Modernizr logo

          Modernizr

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          Respond to your user’s browser features
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          PROS OF MODERNIZR
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