Alternatives to Render logo

Alternatives to Render

Netlify, Heroku, Google App Engine, AWS Elastic Beanstalk, and Apollo are the most popular alternatives and competitors to Render.
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What is Render and what are its top alternatives?

Render is a unified platform to build and run all your apps and websites with free SSL, a global CDN, private networks and auto deploys from Git.
Render is a tool in the Platform as a Service category of a tech stack.

Top Alternatives to Render

  • Netlify

    Netlify

    Netlify is smart enough to process your site and make sure all assets gets optimized and served with perfect caching-headers from a cookie-less domain. We make sure your HTML is served straight from our CDN edge nodes without any round-trip to our backend servers and are the only ones to give you instant cache invalidation when you push a new deploy. Netlify is also the only static hosting service with integrated continuous deployment. ...

  • Heroku

    Heroku

    Heroku is a cloud application platform – a new way of building and deploying web apps. Heroku lets app developers spend 100% of their time on their application code, not managing servers, deployment, ongoing operations, or scaling. ...

  • Google App Engine

    Google App Engine

    Google has a reputation for highly reliable, high performance infrastructure. With App Engine you can take advantage of the 10 years of knowledge Google has in running massively scalable, performance driven systems. App Engine applications are easy to build, easy to maintain, and easy to scale as your traffic and data storage needs grow. ...

  • AWS Elastic Beanstalk

    AWS Elastic Beanstalk

    Once you upload your application, Elastic Beanstalk automatically handles the deployment details of capacity provisioning, load balancing, auto-scaling, and application health monitoring. ...

  • Apollo

    Apollo

    Build a universal GraphQL API on top of your existing REST APIs, so you can ship new application features fast without waiting on backend changes. ...

  • Red Hat OpenShift

    Red Hat OpenShift

    OpenShift is Red Hat's Cloud Computing Platform as a Service (PaaS) offering. OpenShift is an application platform in the cloud where application developers and teams can build, test, deploy, and run their applications. ...

  • Apache Camel

    Apache Camel

    An open source Java framework that focuses on making integration easier and more accessible to developers. ...

  • Azure Websites

    Azure Websites

    Azure Websites is a fully managed Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) that enables you to build, deploy and scale enterprise-grade web Apps in seconds. Focus on your application code, and let Azure take care of the infrastructure to scale and securely run it for you. ...

Render alternatives & related posts

Netlify logo

Netlify

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Build, deploy and host your static site or app with a drag and drop interface and automatic delpoys...
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PROS OF NETLIFY
  • 43
    Easy deploy
  • 41
    Fastest static hosting and continuous deployments
  • 21
    Free SSL support
  • 21
    Super simple deploys
  • 15
    Easy Setup and Continous deployments
  • 9
    Free plan for personal websites
  • 9
    Faster than any other option in the market
  • 7
    Deploy previews
  • 6
    Free Open Source (Pro) plan
  • 4
    Easy to use and great support
  • 4
    Analytics
  • 4
    Great loop-in material on a blog
  • 3
    Great drag and drop functionality
  • 3
    Fastest static hosting and continuous deployments
  • 2
    Custom domains support
  • 1
    Canary Releases (Split Tests)
  • 1
    Tech oriented support
  • 1
    Supports static site generators
CONS OF NETLIFY
  • 8
    It's expensive
  • 1
    Bandwidth limitation

related Netlify posts

Johnny Bell

I was building a personal project that I needed to store items in a real time database. I am more comfortable with my Frontend skills than my backend so I didn't want to spend time building out anything in Ruby or Go.

I stumbled on Firebase by #Google, and it was really all I needed. It had realtime data, an area for storing file uploads and best of all for the amount of data I needed it was free!

I built out my application using tools I was familiar with, React for the framework, Redux.js to manage my state across components, and styled-components for the styling.

Now as this was a project I was just working on in my free time for fun I didn't really want to pay for hosting. I did some research and I found Netlify. I had actually seen them at #ReactRally the year before and deployed a Gatsby site to Netlify already.

Netlify was very easy to setup and link to my GitHub account you select a repo and pretty much with very little configuration you have a live site that will deploy every time you push to master.

With the selection of these tools I was able to build out my application, connect it to a realtime database, and deploy to a live environment all with $0 spent.

If you're looking to build out a small app I suggest giving these tools a go as you can get your idea out into the real world for absolutely no cost.

See more
Stephen Gheysens
Senior Solutions Engineer at Twilio · | 14 upvotes · 350K views

Hi Otensia! I'd definitely recommend using the skills you've already got and building with JavaScript is a smart way to go these days. Most platform services have JavaScript/Node SDKs or NPM packages, many serverless platforms support Node in case you need to write any backend logic, and JavaScript is incredibly popular - meaning it will be easy to hire for, should you ever need to.

My advice would be "don't reinvent the wheel". If you already have a skill set that will work well to solve the problem at hand, and you don't need it for any other projects, don't spend the time jumping into a new language. If you're looking for an excuse to learn something new, it would be better to invest that time in learning a new platform/tool that compliments your knowledge of JavaScript. For this project, I might recommend using Netlify, Vercel, or Google Firebase to quickly and easily deploy your web app. If you need to add user authentication, there are great examples out there for Firebase Authentication, Auth0, or even Magic (a newcomer on the Auth scene, but very user friendly). All of these services work very well with a JavaScript-based application.

See more
Heroku logo

Heroku

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Build, deliver, monitor and scale web apps and APIs with a trail blazing developer experience.
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PROS OF HEROKU
  • 704
    Easy deployment
  • 460
    Free for side projects
  • 374
    Huge time-saver
  • 348
    Simple scaling
  • 261
    Low devops skills required
  • 190
    Easy setup
  • 174
    Add-ons for almost everything
  • 154
    Beginner friendly
  • 150
    Better for startups
  • 133
    Low learning curve
  • 48
    Postgres hosting
  • 41
    Easy to add collaborators
  • 30
    Faster development
  • 24
    Awesome documentation
  • 19
    Focus on product, not deployment
  • 19
    Simple rollback
  • 15
    Natural companion for rails development
  • 15
    Easy integration
  • 12
    Great customer support
  • 8
    GitHub integration
  • 6
    No-ops
  • 6
    Painless & well documented
  • 4
    Free
  • 4
    I love that they make it free to launch a side project
  • 3
    Just works
  • 3
    Great UI
  • 2
    PostgreSQL forking and following
  • 2
    MySQL extension
  • 1
    Able to host stuff good like Discord Bot
  • 0
    Sec
  • 0
    Security
CONS OF HEROKU
  • 23
    Super expensive
  • 6
    Not a whole lot of flexibility
  • 5
    No usable MySQL option
  • 5
    Storage
  • 4
    Low performance on free tier
  • 1
    24/7 support is $1,000 per month

related Heroku posts

Russel Werner
Lead Engineer at StackShare · | 29 upvotes · 1.5M views

StackShare Feed is built entirely with React, Glamorous, and Apollo. One of our objectives with the public launch of the Feed was to enable a Server-side rendered (SSR) experience for our organic search traffic. When you visit the StackShare Feed, and you aren't logged in, you are delivered the Trending feed experience. We use an in-house Node.js rendering microservice to generate this HTML. This microservice needs to run and serve requests independent of our Rails web app. Up until recently, we had a mono-repo with our Rails and React code living happily together and all served from the same web process. In order to deploy our SSR app into a Heroku environment, we needed to split out our front-end application into a separate repo in GitHub. The driving factor in this decision was mostly due to limitations imposed by Heroku specifically with how processes can't communicate with each other. A new SSR app was created in Heroku and linked directly to the frontend repo so it stays in-sync with changes.

Related to this, we need a way to "deploy" our frontend changes to various server environments without building & releasing the entire Ruby application. We built a hybrid Amazon S3 Amazon CloudFront solution to host our Webpack bundles. A new CircleCI script builds the bundles and uploads them to S3. The final step in our rollout is to update some keys in Redis so our Rails app knows which bundles to serve. The result of these efforts were significant. Our frontend team now moves independently of our backend team, our build & release process takes only a few minutes, we are now using an edge CDN to serve JS assets, and we have pre-rendered React pages!

#StackDecisionsLaunch #SSR #Microservices #FrontEndRepoSplit

See more
Simon Reymann
Senior Fullstack Developer at QUANTUSflow Software GmbH · | 28 upvotes · 3.2M views

Our whole DevOps stack consists of the following tools:

  • GitHub (incl. GitHub Pages/Markdown for Documentation, GettingStarted and HowTo's) for collaborative review and code management tool
  • Respectively Git as revision control system
  • SourceTree as Git GUI
  • Visual Studio Code as IDE
  • CircleCI for continuous integration (automatize development process)
  • Prettier / TSLint / ESLint as code linter
  • SonarQube as quality gate
  • Docker as container management (incl. Docker Compose for multi-container application management)
  • VirtualBox for operating system simulation tests
  • Kubernetes as cluster management for docker containers
  • Heroku for deploying in test environments
  • nginx as web server (preferably used as facade server in production environment)
  • SSLMate (using OpenSSL) for certificate management
  • Amazon EC2 (incl. Amazon S3) for deploying in stage (production-like) and production environments
  • PostgreSQL as preferred database system
  • Redis as preferred in-memory database/store (great for caching)

The main reason we have chosen Kubernetes over Docker Swarm is related to the following artifacts:

  • Key features: Easy and flexible installation, Clear dashboard, Great scaling operations, Monitoring is an integral part, Great load balancing concepts, Monitors the condition and ensures compensation in the event of failure.
  • Applications: An application can be deployed using a combination of pods, deployments, and services (or micro-services).
  • Functionality: Kubernetes as a complex installation and setup process, but it not as limited as Docker Swarm.
  • Monitoring: It supports multiple versions of logging and monitoring when the services are deployed within the cluster (Elasticsearch/Kibana (ELK), Heapster/Grafana, Sysdig cloud integration).
  • Scalability: All-in-one framework for distributed systems.
  • Other Benefits: Kubernetes is backed by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), huge community among container orchestration tools, it is an open source and modular tool that works with any OS.
See more
Google App Engine logo

Google App Engine

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Build web applications on the same scalable systems that power Google applications
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PROS OF GOOGLE APP ENGINE
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    Easy to deploy
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    Auto scaling
  • 80
    Good free plan
  • 64
    Easy management
  • 58
    Scalability
  • 35
    Low cost
  • 33
    Comprehensive set of features
  • 29
    All services in one place
  • 23
    Simple scaling
  • 20
    Quick and reliable cloud servers
  • 5
    Granular Billing
  • 4
    Easy to develop and unit test
  • 3
    Monitoring gives comprehensive set of key indicators
  • 2
    Create APIs quickly with cloud endpoints
  • 2
    Really easy to quickly bring up a full stack
  • 1
    Mostly up
  • 1
    No Ops
CONS OF GOOGLE APP ENGINE
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    related Google App Engine posts

    Nick Rockwell
    SVP, Engineering at Fastly · | 11 upvotes · 282.5K views

    So, the shift from Amazon EC2 to Google App Engine and generally #AWS to #GCP was a long decision and in the end, it's one that we've taken with eyes open and that we reserve the right to modify at any time. And to be clear, we continue to do a lot of stuff with AWS. But, by default, the content of the decision was, for our consumer-facing products, we're going to use GCP first. And if there's some reason why we don't think that's going to work out great, then we'll happily use AWS. In practice, that hasn't really happened. We've been able to meet almost 100% of our needs in GCP.

    So it's basically mostly Google Kubernetes Engine , we're mostly running stuff on Kubernetes right now.

    #AWStoGCPmigration #cloudmigration #migration

    See more
    Aliadoc Team

    In #Aliadoc, we're exploring the crowdfunding option to get traction before launch. We are building a SaaS platform for website design customization.

    For the Admin UI and website editor we use React and we're currently transitioning from a Create React App setup to a custom one because our needs have become more specific. We use CloudFlare as much as possible, it's a great service.

    For routing dynamic resources and proxy tasks to feed websites to the editor we leverage CloudFlare Workers for improved responsiveness. We use Firebase for our hosting needs and user authentication while also using several Cloud Functions for Firebase to interact with other services along with Google App Engine and Google Cloud Storage, but also the Real Time Database is on the radar for collaborative website editing.

    We generally hate configuration but honestly because of the stage of our project we lack resources for doing heavy sysops work. So we are basically just relying on Serverless technologies as much as we can to do all server side processing.

    Visual Studio Code definitively makes programming a much easier and enjoyable task, we just love it. We combine it with Bitbucket for our source code control needs.

    See more
    AWS Elastic Beanstalk logo

    AWS Elastic Beanstalk

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    Quickly deploy and manage applications in the AWS cloud.
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    PROS OF AWS ELASTIC BEANSTALK
    • 77
      Integrates with other aws services
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      Simple deployment
    • 44
      Fast
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      Painless
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      Free
    • 3
      Independend app container
    • 3
      Well-documented
    • 2
      Ability to be customized
    • 2
      Postgres hosting
    CONS OF AWS ELASTIC BEANSTALK
    • 2
      Charges appear automatically after exceeding free quota
    • 1
      Lots of moving parts and config
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      Slow deployments

    related AWS Elastic Beanstalk posts

    Julien DeFrance
    Principal Software Engineer at Tophatter · | 16 upvotes · 2.4M views

    Back in 2014, I was given an opportunity to re-architect SmartZip Analytics platform, and flagship product: SmartTargeting. This is a SaaS software helping real estate professionals keeping up with their prospects and leads in a given neighborhood/territory, finding out (thanks to predictive analytics) who's the most likely to list/sell their home, and running cross-channel marketing automation against them: direct mail, online ads, email... The company also does provide Data APIs to Enterprise customers.

    I had inherited years and years of technical debt and I knew things had to change radically. The first enabler to this was to make use of the cloud and go with AWS, so we would stop re-inventing the wheel, and build around managed/scalable services.

    For the SaaS product, we kept on working with Rails as this was what my team had the most knowledge in. We've however broken up the monolith and decoupled the front-end application from the backend thanks to the use of Rails API so we'd get independently scalable micro-services from now on.

    Our various applications could now be deployed using AWS Elastic Beanstalk so we wouldn't waste any more efforts writing time-consuming Capistrano deployment scripts for instance. Combined with Docker so our application would run within its own container, independently from the underlying host configuration.

    Storage-wise, we went with Amazon S3 and ditched any pre-existing local or network storage people used to deal with in our legacy systems. On the database side: Amazon RDS / MySQL initially. Ultimately migrated to Amazon RDS for Aurora / MySQL when it got released. Once again, here you need a managed service your cloud provider handles for you.

    Future improvements / technology decisions included:

    Caching: Amazon ElastiCache / Memcached CDN: Amazon CloudFront Systems Integration: Segment / Zapier Data-warehousing: Amazon Redshift BI: Amazon Quicksight / Superset Search: Elasticsearch / Amazon Elasticsearch Service / Algolia Monitoring: New Relic

    As our usage grows, patterns changed, and/or our business needs evolved, my role as Engineering Manager then Director of Engineering was also to ensure my team kept on learning and innovating, while delivering on business value.

    One of these innovations was to get ourselves into Serverless : Adopting AWS Lambda was a big step forward. At the time, only available for Node.js (Not Ruby ) but a great way to handle cost efficiency, unpredictable traffic, sudden bursts of traffic... Ultimately you want the whole chain of services involved in a call to be serverless, and that's when we've started leveraging Amazon DynamoDB on these projects so they'd be fully scalable.

    See more

    We initially started out with Heroku as our PaaS provider due to a desire to use it by our original developer for our Ruby on Rails application/website at the time. We were finding response times slow, it was painfully slow, sometimes taking 10 seconds to start loading the main page. Moving up to the next "compute" level was going to be very expensive.

    We moved our site over to AWS Elastic Beanstalk , not only did response times on the site practically become instant, our cloud bill for the application was cut in half.

    In database world we are currently using Amazon RDS for PostgreSQL also, we have both MariaDB and Microsoft SQL Server both hosted on Amazon RDS. The plan is to migrate to AWS Aurora Serverless for all 3 of those database systems.

    Additional services we use for our public applications: AWS Lambda, Python, Redis, Memcached, AWS Elastic Load Balancing (ELB), Amazon Elasticsearch Service, Amazon ElastiCache

    See more
    Apollo logo

    Apollo

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    GraphQL server for Express, Connect, Hapi, Koa and more
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    PROS OF APOLLO
    • 12
      From the creators of Meteor
    • 3
      Great documentation
    • 2
      Real time if use subscription
    • 1
      Open source
    CONS OF APOLLO
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      related Apollo posts

      Nick Rockwell
      SVP, Engineering at Fastly · | 44 upvotes · 1.7M views

      When I joined NYT there was already broad dissatisfaction with the LAMP (Linux Apache HTTP Server MySQL PHP) Stack and the front end framework, in particular. So, I wasn't passing judgment on it. I mean, LAMP's fine, you can do good work in LAMP. It's a little dated at this point, but it's not ... I didn't want to rip it out for its own sake, but everyone else was like, "We don't like this, it's really inflexible." And I remember from being outside the company when that was called MIT FIVE when it had launched. And been observing it from the outside, and I was like, you guys took so long to do that and you did it so carefully, and yet you're not happy with your decisions. Why is that? That was more the impetus. If we're going to do this again, how are we going to do it in a way that we're gonna get a better result?

      So we're moving quickly away from LAMP, I would say. So, right now, the new front end is React based and using Apollo. And we've been in a long, protracted, gradual rollout of the core experiences.

      React is now talking to GraphQL as a primary API. There's a Node.js back end, to the front end, which is mainly for server-side rendering, as well.

      Behind there, the main repository for the GraphQL server is a big table repository, that we call Bodega because it's a convenience store. And that reads off of a Kafka pipeline.

      See more
      Adam Neary

      At Airbnb we use GraphQL Unions for a "Backend-Driven UI." We have built a system where a very dynamic page is constructed based on a query that will return an array of some set of possible “sections.” These sections are responsive and define the UI completely.

      The central file that manages this would be a generated file. Since the list of possible sections is quite large (~50 sections today for Search), it also presumes we have a sane mechanism for lazy-loading components with server rendering, which is a topic for another post. Suffice it to say, we do not need to package all possible sections in a massive bundle to account for everything up front.

      Each section component defines its own query fragment, colocated with the section’s component code. This is the general idea of Backend-Driven UI at Airbnb. It’s used in a number of places, including Search, Trip Planner, Host tools, and various landing pages. We use this as our starting point, and then in the demo show how to (1) make and update to an existing section, and (2) add a new section.

      While building your product, you want to be able to explore your schema, discovering field names and testing out potential queries on live development data. We achieve that today with GraphQL Playground, the work of our friends at #Prisma. The tools come standard with Apollo Server.

      #BackendDrivenUI

      See more
      Red Hat OpenShift logo

      Red Hat OpenShift

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      Red Hat's free Platform as a Service (PaaS) for hosting Java, PHP, Ruby, Python, Node.js, and Perl apps
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      PROS OF RED HAT OPENSHIFT
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        Good free plan
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        Open Source
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        Easy setup
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        Nodejs support
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        Well documented
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        Custom domains
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        Mongodb support
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        Clean and simple architecture
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        PHP support
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        Customizable environments
      • 10
        Ability to run CRON jobs
      • 8
        Easier than Heroku for a WordPress blog
      • 6
        PostgreSQL support
      • 6
        Autoscaling
      • 6
        Easy deployment
      • 6
        Good balance between Heroku and AWS for flexibility
      • 5
        Free, Easy Setup, Lot of Gear or D.I.Y Gear
      • 4
        Shell access to gears
      • 3
        Great Support
      • 2
        Overly complicated and over engineered in majority of e
      • 2
        Golang support
      • 2
        Its free and offer custom domain usage
      • 1
        Meteor support
      • 1
        Easy setup and great customer support
      • 1
        High Security
      • 1
        No credit card needed
      • 1
        because it is easy to manage
      • 1
        Logging & Metrics
      • 1
        Autoscaling at a good price point
      • 1
        Great free plan with excellent support
      • 1
        This is the only free one among the three as of today
      CONS OF RED HAT OPENSHIFT
      • 2
        Decisions are made for you, limiting your options
      • 2
        License cost
      • 1
        Behind, sometimes severely, the upstreams

      related Red Hat OpenShift posts

      Conor Myhrvold
      Tech Brand Mgr, Office of CTO at Uber · | 39 upvotes · 4.2M views

      How Uber developed the open source, end-to-end distributed tracing Jaeger , now a CNCF project:

      Distributed tracing is quickly becoming a must-have component in the tools that organizations use to monitor their complex, microservice-based architectures. At Uber, our open source distributed tracing system Jaeger saw large-scale internal adoption throughout 2016, integrated into hundreds of microservices and now recording thousands of traces every second.

      Here is the story of how we got here, from investigating off-the-shelf solutions like Zipkin, to why we switched from pull to push architecture, and how distributed tracing will continue to evolve:

      https://eng.uber.com/distributed-tracing/

      (GitHub Pages : https://www.jaegertracing.io/, GitHub: https://github.com/jaegertracing/jaeger)

      Bindings/Operator: Python Java Node.js Go C++ Kubernetes JavaScript OpenShift C# Apache Spark

      See more
      Michael Ionita

      We use Kubernetes because we decided to migrate to a hosted cluster (not AWS) and still be able to scale our clusters up and down depending on load. By wrapping it with OpenShift we are now able to easily adapt to demand but also able to separate concerns into separate Pods depending on use-cases we have.

      See more
      Apache Camel logo

      Apache Camel

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      A versatile open source integration framework
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      PROS OF APACHE CAMEL
      • 5
        Based on Enterprise Integration Patterns
      • 4
        Free (open source)
      • 4
        Highly configurable
      • 3
        Open Source
      • 3
        Has over 250 components
      • 2
        Has great community
      CONS OF APACHE CAMEL
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        related Apache Camel posts

        Azure Websites logo

        Azure Websites

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        Deploy and scale modern websites and web apps in seconds
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        PROS OF AZURE WEBSITES
        • 17
          Ease of deployment
        • 6
          Free plans for students
        CONS OF AZURE WEBSITES
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