Eclipse聽vs聽Visual Studio Code

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Eclipse vs Visual Studio Code: What are the differences?

What is Eclipse? IDE for Java EE Developers. Standard Eclipse package suited for Java and plug-in development plus adding new plugins; already includes Git, Marketplace Client, source code and developer documentation Click here to file a bug against Eclipse Platform..

What is Visual Studio Code? Build and debug modern web and cloud applications, by Microsoft. Build and debug modern web and cloud applications. Code is free and available on your favorite platform - Linux, Mac OSX, and Windows.

Eclipse and Visual Studio Code are primarily classified as "Integrated Development Environment" and "Text Editor" tools respectively.

"Does it all", "Integrates with most of tools" and "Easy to use" are the key factors why developers consider Eclipse; whereas "Powerful multilanguage IDE", "Fast" and "Front-end develop out of the box" are the primary reasons why Visual Studio Code is favored.

Visual Studio Code is an open source tool with 78.4K GitHub stars and 10.9K GitHub forks. Here's a link to Visual Studio Code's open source repository on GitHub.

PedidosYa, Yahoo!, and triGo GmbH are some of the popular companies that use Visual Studio Code, whereas Eclipse is used by PedidosYa, hike, and Webedia. Visual Studio Code has a broader approval, being mentioned in 1104 company stacks & 2298 developers stacks; compared to Eclipse, which is listed in 248 company stacks and 138 developer stacks.

- No public GitHub repository available -

What is Eclipse?

Standard Eclipse package suited for Java and plug-in development plus adding new plugins; already includes Git, Marketplace Client, source code and developer documentation. Click here to file a bug against Eclipse Platform.

What is Visual Studio Code?

Build and debug modern web and cloud applications. Code is free and available on your favorite platform - Linux, Mac OSX, and Windows.
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What are some alternatives to Eclipse and Visual Studio Code?
Android Studio
Android Studio is a new Android development environment based on IntelliJ IDEA. It provides new features and improvements over Eclipse ADT and will be the official Android IDE once it's ready.
Visual Studio
Visual Studio is a suite of component-based software development tools and other technologies for building powerful, high-performance applications.
IntelliJ IDEA
Out of the box, IntelliJ IDEA provides a comprehensive feature set including tools and integrations with the most important modern technologies and frameworks for enterprise and web development with Java, Scala, Groovy and other languages.
NetBeans IDE
NetBeans IDE is FREE, open source, and has a worldwide community of users and developers.
PyCharm
PyCharm鈥檚 smart code editor provides first-class support for Python, JavaScript, CoffeeScript, TypeScript, CSS, popular template languages and more. Take advantage of language-aware code completion, error detection, and on-the-fly code fixes!
See all alternatives
Decisions about Eclipse and Visual Studio Code
Denys
Denys
Software engineer at Typeform | 7 upvotes 42.5K views
atTypeformTypeform
Go
Go
Visual Studio Code
Visual Studio Code
Vim
Vim
Git
Git
Docker
Docker
Docker Compose
Docker Compose
  • Go because it's easy and simple, facilitates collaboration , and also it's fast, scalable, powerful.
  • Visual Studio Code because it has one of the most sophisticated Go language support plugins.
  • Vim because it's Vim
  • Git because it's Git
  • Docker and Docker Compose because it's quick and easy to have reproducible builds/tests with them
  • @Archlinux (wtf it's not here?!) because Docker for Mac/Win is a disaster for the human's central nervous system, and Arch is the coolest Linux distro so far
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Visual Studio Code
Visual Studio Code
Atom
Atom

Before switching to Visual Studio Code, I used Atom. In contrast to Atom, Visual Studio Code is faster, provides more built-in features, and fails less often.

I started using Visual Studio Code because Atom was oftentimes extremely slow on even basic tasks, and there were bugs that could freeze the entire window if you dragged something the wrong way. Atom also didn't have as many integrated features as Visual Studio Code, so I had to find all of the best extensions. Even with the right tools available, many language extensions were frequently buggy, ineffective, and slow.

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Jacob Biehler
Jacob Biehler
TypeScript
TypeScript
Electron
Electron
Visual Studio Code
Visual Studio Code

I use Visual Studio Code because it is great out of the box, it has an integrated terminal, and support for quite a few languages. As a developer who works with TypeScript, their tooling is amazing in the VSCode Marketplace. The best part about VSCode is that can be as lightweight or as decked out as you want it to be. Even though a lot of other IDE's are Electron apps just like VSCode I find that VSCode boots up the fastest. I've tried other IDE's and I always find myself coming back to VSCode.

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Visual Studio Code
Visual Studio Code
AngularJS
AngularJS
Atom
Atom

Both are very good! But I started with Visual Studio Code when I started to work with AngularJS 4. I tried to use Atom too, but at that time Atom did not have good Angular plugins, in the other side VS Code has nice plugins for Angular. I do not know how is Atom now a days about this, but I think that it must have evolved.

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Dean Stringer
Dean Stringer
at Systemic Solutions | 6 upvotes 37.9K views
Eclipse
Eclipse
Atom
Atom
Electron
Electron
TypeScript
TypeScript
Visual Studio Code
Visual Studio Code

Have been a Visual Studio Code user since just after launch to the general public, having used the likes of Eclipse and Atom previously. Was amazed how mature it seemed off the bat and was super intrigued by the bootstrapped nature of it having been written/based on Electron/TypeScript, and of course being an open-source app from Microsoft. The features, plugin ecosystem and release frequency are very impressive. I do dev work on both Mac and Windows and don't use anything else now as far as IDEs go.

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TypeScript
TypeScript
JSON
JSON
Docker
Docker
Markdown
Markdown
Angular 2
Angular 2
Visual Studio Code
Visual Studio Code
Atom
Atom
#Typescript
#Java
#HTML
#Sass

More than year ago I was looking for the best editor of Angular 2 application and I've tried Visual Studio Code and Atom. Atom had performance issues that put me off completely to use it again. Visual Studio Code became my main editor #Typescript files (and partly editor of #Java files). I'm happy with Visual Studio Code and I've never look back on Atom. There wasn't any reason to try Atom again, because Visual Studio Code fulfills my requirements very well. I use it for editing of TypeScript, #HTML, #Sass, JSON, Docker and Markdown.

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Visual Studio Code
Visual Studio Code
Atom
Atom

Visual Studio Code became available around the time my Atom editor started frustrating with hitching and slowdowns. It was likely some plugin I had installed, but a similar setup in Visual Studio Code ran just fine.

Since then they've made massive improvements, and turned it into an excellent IDE overall. I use only a fraction of its functionality, but unless you use some very obscure language, you're likely to find support for it.

Even out of the box it already supports much of what I need, and it now even recommends suitable plugins in many situations.

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Justin Dorfman
Justin Dorfman
Developer Evangelist at StackShare | 8 upvotes 11.7K views
Visual Studio Code
Visual Studio Code
Atom
Atom

A few months ago, I decided I would try Visual Studio Code. I resisted for so long because I knew I would love it and would then have to find alternative extensions for the ones I have installed in Atom. Fast forward to today and I'm kicking myself for not doing it sooner.

Extensions that I use:

What VSCode extensions do you use? 馃憞

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Kyle Maune
Kyle Maune
Software Engineer at Cooper Aerial | 6 upvotes 10.6K views
Atom
Atom
Visual Studio Code
Visual Studio Code

I use Atom because it's been around long enough to have plugins for everything. It is very unlikely that there isn鈥檛 a plugin for your favorite language. It鈥檚 super easy to install plugins and packages (or to write your own!). The editor defaults are great: it鈥檚 the best default setup I鈥檝e ever seen for a text editor. One can download this thing and get working immediately.

At the end of the day, most modern text editors are great. I do love Visual Studio Code as well! I often find myself switching between the two for no other reason other than just because.

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AlexFielder
AlexFielder
Visual Studio Code
Visual Studio Code

I use Visual Studio Code because it's better than Emacs. For the past ~2 years I've been working with a language called 'CM' created by a company called CET. This language is around 15 years old and looks a lot like C#. VSCode was the obvious choice for me having come from a Visual Studio (VB.NET C#.NET) background as with the CM Extension I didn't need to learn and/or remember ANY of the Emacs shortcuts. This tool has proven so popular that amongst my fellow 'CM' developers, there are now over 900 downloads of the extension (around 10 of those at least being from my own systems/reinstalls etc.)

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Vijay Manchi
Vijay Manchi
at Yammer | 5 upvotes 56.6K views
atYammerYammer
Visual Studio Code
Visual Studio Code

I use Visual Studio Code because its fast, and has lot of extensions that makes development with many languages, frameworks and cloud services very easy. Also love the shortcut keys and the ability to customize the behavior of the IDE in lots of different ways. Another aspect of it thats nice is that it's very transparent. It allows us to see every piece of code, config etc. without automatically generating or hiding parts of it behind some GUI. So we will be exposed to every aspect of the development giving us better confidence and understanding of how the build, debugging, packaging, testing, publishing etc. works exactly.

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Julian Sanchez
Julian Sanchez
Lead Developer at Chore Champion | 8 upvotes 36K views
atChore ChampionChore Champion
Visual Studio Code
Visual Studio Code
Git
Git
Sublime Merge
Sublime Merge
Visual Studio Live Share
Visual Studio Live Share
Atom
Atom
Sublime Text
Sublime Text

We use Visual Studio Code because it allows us to easily and quickly integrate with Git, much like Sublime Merge ,but it is integrated into the IDE. Another cool part about VS Code is the ability collaborate with each other with Visual Studio Live Share which allows our whole team to get more done together. It brings the convenience of the Google Suite to programming, offering something that works more smoothly than anything found on Atom or Sublime Text

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Visual Studio Code
Visual Studio Code
Atom
Atom
Sublime Text
Sublime Text

I use Visual Studio Code because it is a super flexible code editor that can be customized to function like a full IDE. It has great git and terminal integrations out of the box compared to Atom and Sublime Text

It has so many extensions and boots up pretty fast even with all my extensions.

Feel free to checkout my settings: VS Code Settings

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Gustavo Mu帽oz
Gustavo Mu帽oz
Web UI Developer at Globant | 3 upvotes 31.8K views
Visual Studio Code
Visual Studio Code
Atom
Atom
Sublime Text
Sublime Text
Vim
Vim
Notepad++
Notepad++
React
React
Flutter
Flutter
TypeScript
TypeScript
#RESTfulAPI
#Microsoft

I have chosen Visual Studio Code after testing a lot of other editors like Atom, Sublime Text (with legal license), Vim or even Notepad++ because it is the sum of all their virtues and none of their defects. It's fast, it has all the tools and plugins I need to work, and it's pretty and very good optimized. It has what I need to work and nothing more. And the main plugins works like a charm. Developing for React or Flutter is amazing. Even the TypeScript plugin works great. I like how IntelliSense works, and all the extra tools to code remotely using #ssh, access #RESTfulAPI or event manage projects or collaborating remotely. Thanks #Microsoft for Visual Studio Code.

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Labinator Team
Labinator Team
at Labinator | 13 upvotes 83.2K views
atLabinatorLabinator
HTML5
HTML5
CSS 3
CSS 3
Sass
Sass
Vanilla.JS
Vanilla.JS
PHP
PHP
WordPress
WordPress
Sublime Text
Sublime Text
Visual Studio Code
Visual Studio Code
Manjaro
Manjaro
Debian
Debian

At labinator.com, we use HTML5, CSS 3, Sass, Vanilla.JS and PHP when building our premium WordPress themes and plugins. When writing our codes, we use Sublime Text and Visual Studio Code depending on the project. We run Manjaro and Debian operating systems in our office. Manjaro is a great desktop operating system for all range of tasks while Debian is a solid choice for servers.

WordPress became a very popular choice when it comes to content management systems and building websites. It is easy to learn and has a great community behind it. The high number of plugins as well that are available for WordPress allows any user to customize it depending on his/her needs.

For development, HTML5 with Sass is our go-to choice when building our themes.

Main Advantages Of Sass:

  • It's CSS syntax friendly
  • It offers variables
  • It uses a nested syn