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Monaco Editor

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149
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14
Vim

24.3K
19.5K
+ 1
2.3K
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Monaco Editor vs Vim: What are the differences?

What is Monaco Editor? A browser based code editor. The Monaco Editor is the code editor that powers VS Code. It is licensed under the MIT License and supports IE 9/10/11, Edge, Chrome, Firefox, Safari and Opera.

What is Vim? Highly configurable text editor built to enable efficient text editing. Vim is an advanced text editor that seeks to provide the power of the de-facto Unix editor 'Vi', with a more complete feature set. Vim is a highly configurable text editor built to enable efficient text editing. It is an improved version of the vi editor distributed with most UNIX systems. Vim is distributed free as charityware.

Monaco Editor and Vim can be categorized as "Text Editor" tools.

"Out of the Box Intellisense" is the top reason why over 3 developers like Monaco Editor, while over 334 developers mention "Comes by default in most unix systems (remote editing)" as the leading cause for choosing Vim.

Monaco Editor is an open source tool with 15.9K GitHub stars and 1.39K GitHub forks. Here's a link to Monaco Editor's open source repository on GitHub.

According to the StackShare community, Vim has a broader approval, being mentioned in 850 company stacks & 890 developers stacks; compared to Monaco Editor, which is listed in 3 company stacks and 10 developer stacks.

Advice on Monaco Editor and Vim
Rogério R. Alcântara
Needs advice
on
NeovimNeovim
and
VimVim

For a Visual Studio Code/Atom developer that works mostly with Node.js/TypeScript/Ruby/Go and wants to get rid of graphic-text-editors-IDE-like at once, which one is worthy of investing time to pick up?

I'm a total n00b on the subject, but I've read good things about Neovim's Lua support, and I wonder what would be the VIM response/approach for it?

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Replies (6)
Recommends
NeovimNeovimVimVim

Neovim can basically do everything Vim can with one major advantage - the number of contributors to the code base is just so much wider (Vim is ~100% maintained only by B. Mooleanaar). Whatever you learn for Neovim you can also apply to Vim and vice versa. And of course there is the never ending Vim vs Emacs controversy - but better not get into that war.

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Jeffrey Johnson
Recommends
at

Actually, the biggest advantage with Neovim (as a VS user) is that you can embed REAL Neovim as the editor UI, rather than using a "Vim emulation", you're using actual NVIM, embedded in VS!

"asvetliakov.vscode-neovim" is the extension you are looking for:

  1. Install the 'vscode-neovim; extension (https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=asvetliakov.vscode-neovim)
  2. Install Neovim version 0.5+ nightly
  3. Start winning.

(You can install neovim-nightly separately for just vscode, I usually build and install it to /opt/nvim - it's enough enough to do - let me know if you need help).

Works wonderfully. It might not work out of the box if you have some 100K epic nvim initialization file, but the plugin documents a workaround for having an embedding/VS specific configuration.

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Kudos Beluga
Recommends
NeovimNeovim

I don't actually notice much of a difference between the two, as the end result looks identical. If you use Vim and are switch to Neovim it's an extremely easy 1-minute process. I switched from Vim to Neovim. I can't say I found much of a difference, but the key points where Neovim could be better than just vim is that first, there are much more people maintaining Neovim compared to vim, which means fewer bugs and a modern code base. It also has a smaller code base which might result in a small speed improvement. Another thing is that it's basically just a fork of vim, so what harm can it do? ;)

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Tarcísio Gruppi
Recommends
VimVim

I recommend using vim 8+ it has native plugin support if you need language supports you can install the package vim-nox which will come with support for python, lua, ruby, etc

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Rogério R. Alcântara
Recommends
NeovimNeovim

The hints on the codebase's contributors and the VSCode integration helped me make up my mind.

I really appreciate all comments, though.

Thanks a bunch!

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Albert Kim
Recommends

It truly depends on whether you want to completely avoid GUI and stick to TUI and command lines. If you want to edit all of your codes within a terminal, then Vim or neovim would be the choice. Emacs can be run in a terminal, but the functionality is limited. Most people use Emacs using GUI and emacs-client not to use too much memory.

My general preference is to use an independent text editor, which is better if it is highly customizable and programmable. So, I have used Emacs for several years. For beginners, I guess Emacs requires significant time to learn to fully enjoy its wonderful functionalities. In that sense, using atom would be a recommendable option.

Regardless of all the situations, learning basic vim in the terminal will help you in any case. In summary, I recommend 1. vim as a default editor in the terminal 2. atom if you are a beginner, or 3. Emacs if you have a long-term plan to master a programmable editor

Other editors like sublime text, VS code, and so forth are also worth learning and using. But, no matter which editor you choose, stick to one or two until you become an advanced user. Being able to use most text editors at an intermediate level is waste of time.

I hope it helps.

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Pros of Monaco Editor
Pros of Vim
  • 5
    Out of the Box Intellisense
  • 3
    More features than Ace
  • 2
    Power vscode, with all it's features
  • 2
    Microsoft Product
  • 1
    Accessibility
  • 1
    Good support for none-monospace fonts
  • 346
    Comes by default in most unix systems (remote editing)
  • 326
    Fast
  • 311
    Highly configurable
  • 297
    Less mouse dependence
  • 246
    Lightweight
  • 144
    Speed
  • 99
    Plugins
  • 96
    Hardcore
  • 81
    It's for pros
  • 65
    Vertically split windows
  • 29
    Open-source
  • 25
    Modal editing
  • 22
    No remembering shortcuts, instead "talks" to the editor
  • 21
    It stood the Test of Time
  • 16
    Unicode
  • 13
    Everything is on the keyboard
  • 13
    Stick with terminal
  • 12
    Dotfiles
  • 12
    VimPlugins
  • 11
    Flexible Indenting
  • 10
    Efficient and powerful
  • 10
    Hands stay on the keyboard
  • 10
    Programmable
  • 9
    Large number of Shortcuts
  • 9
    Everywhere
  • 8
    A chainsaw for text editing
  • 8
    Unmatched productivity
  • 7
    Modal editing changes everything
  • 7
    Super fast
  • 7
    Developer speed
  • 7
    Because its not Emacs
  • 6
    You cannot exit
  • 6
    Themes
  • 6
    Makes you a true bearded developer
  • 5
    Intergrated into most editors
  • 5
    Most and most powerful plugins of any editor
  • 5
    Plugin manager options. Vim-plug, Pathogen, etc
  • 5
    Habit
  • 5
    Shell escapes and shell imports :!<command> and !!cmd
  • 5
    Great on large text files
  • 5
    Shortcuts
  • 5
    EasyMotion
  • 4
    Perfect command line editor
  • 4
    Intuitive, once mastered
  • 1
    Not MicroSoft

Sign up to add or upvote prosMake informed product decisions

Cons of Monaco Editor
Cons of Vim
  • 6
    Microsoft
  • 8
    Ugly UI
  • 5
    Hard to learn

Sign up to add or upvote consMake informed product decisions

- No public GitHub repository available -

What is Monaco Editor?

The Monaco Editor is the code editor that powers VS Code. It is licensed under the MIT License and supports IE 9/10/11, Edge, Chrome, Firefox, Safari and Opera.

What is Vim?

Vim is an advanced text editor that seeks to provide the power of the de-facto Unix editor 'Vi', with a more complete feature set. Vim is a highly configurable text editor built to enable efficient text editing. It is an improved version of the vi editor distributed with most UNIX systems. Vim is distributed free as charityware.

Need advice about which tool to choose?Ask the StackShare community!

What companies use Monaco Editor?
What companies use Vim?
See which teams inside your own company are using Monaco Editor or Vim.
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What tools integrate with Vim?

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What are some alternatives to Monaco Editor and Vim?
CodeMirror
CodeMirror is a JavaScript component that provides a code editor in the browser. When a mode is available for the language you are coding in, it will color your code, and optionally help with indentation.
Visual Studio Code
Build and debug modern web and cloud applications. Code is free and available on your favorite platform - Linux, Mac OSX, and Windows.
Sublime Text
Sublime Text is available for OS X, Windows and Linux. One license is all you need to use Sublime Text on every computer you own, no matter what operating system it uses. Sublime Text uses a custom UI toolkit, optimized for speed and beauty, while taking advantage of native functionality on each platform.
Notepad++
Notepad++ is a free (as in "free speech" and also as in "free beer") source code editor and Notepad replacement that supports several languages. Running in the MS Windows environment, its use is governed by GPL License.
Atom
At GitHub, we're building the text editor we've always wanted. A tool you can customize to do anything, but also use productively on the first day without ever touching a config file. Atom is modern, approachable, and hackable to the core. We can't wait to see what you build with it.
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