CloudFlare

CloudFlare

Utilities / Assets and Media / Content Delivery Network

Decision about PHP, Bulma, Asana, Stripe, Let's Encrypt, CloudFlare, Deployer, Git, GitHub, Ubuntu, nginx, Buddy, Webpack, Vue.js, JavaScript, HTML5, Sass, Google Analytics, PhpStorm, Laravel, CDG

Avatar of Epistol
Epistol.fr ·
CDG

I use Laravel because it's the most advances PHP framework out there, easy to maintain, easy to upgrade and most of all : easy to get a handle on, and to follow every new technology ! PhpStorm is our main software to code, as of simplicity and full range of tools for a modern application.

Google Analytics Analytics of course for a tailored analytics, Bulma as an innovative CSS framework, coupled with our Sass (Scss) pre-processor.

As of more basic stuff, we use HTML5, JavaScript (but with Vue.js too) and Webpack to handle the generation of all this.

To deploy, we set up Buddy to easily send the updates on our nginx / Ubuntu server, where it will connect to our GitHub Git private repository, pull and do all the operations needed with Deployer .

CloudFlare ensure the rapidity of distribution of our content, and Let's Encrypt the https certificate that is more than necessary when we'll want to sell some products with our Stripe api calls.

Asana is here to let us list all the functionalities, possibilities and ideas we want to implement.

11 upvotes·28.1K views

Decision about Code Climate, CloudFlare, Amazon CloudFront, Buddy, Amazon S3, Netlify, GitHub, Gzip, Git, Webpack, Devops

Avatar of johnnyxbell
Sr. Software Engineer at StackShare ·

When I first built my portfolio I used GitHub for the source control and deployed directly to Netlify on a push to master. This was a perfect setup, I didn't need any knowledge about #DevOps or anything, it was all just done for me.

One of the issues I had with Netlify was I wanted to gzip my JavaScript files, I had this setup in my #Webpack file, however Netlify didn't offer an easy way to set this.

Over the weekend I decided I wanted to know more about how #DevOps worked so I decided to switch from Netlify to Amazon S3. Instead of creating any #Git Webhooks I decided to use Buddy for my pipeline and to run commands. Buddy is a fantastic tool, very easy to setup builds, copying the files to my Amazon S3 bucket, then running some #AWS console commands to set the content-encoding of the JavaScript files. - Buddy is also free if you only have a few pipelines, so I didn't need to pay anything 🤙🏻.

When I made these changes I also wanted to monitor my code, and make sure I was keeping up with the best practices so I implemented Code Climate to look over my code and tell me where there code smells, issues, and other issues I've been super happy with it so far, on the free tier so its also free.

I did plan on using Amazon CloudFront for my SSL and cacheing, however it was overly complex to setup and it costs money. So I decided to go with the free tier of CloudFlare and it is amazing, best choice I've made for caching / SSL in a long time.

9 upvotes·2 comments·13.7K views

Decision about CloudFlare, Amazon CloudFront, Amazon S3

Avatar of johnnyxbell
Sr. Software Engineer at StackShare ·

I recently moved my portfolio to Amazon S3 and I needed a new way to cache and SSL my site as Amazon S3 does not come with this right out of the box. I tried Amazon CloudFront as I was already on Amazon S3 I thought this would be super easy and straight forward to setup... It was not, I was unable to get this working even though I followed all the online steps and even reached out for help to Amazon.

I'd used CloudFlare in the past, and thought let me see if I can set up CloudFlare on an Amazon S3 bucket. The setup for this was so basic and easy... I had it setup with caching and SSL within 5 minutes, and it was 100% free.

8 upvotes·8K views

Decision at UI licious about Firebase, CloudFlare, Cloud Functions for Firebase

Avatar of PicoCreator
CTO at Uilicious ·

For inboxkitten.com, an opensource disposable email service;

We migrated our serverless workload from Cloud Functions for Firebase to CloudFlare workers, taking advantage of the lower cost and faster-performing edge computing of Cloudflare network. Made possible due to our extremely low CPU and RAM overhead of our serverless functions.

If I were to summarize the limitation of Cloudflare (as oppose to firebase/gcp functions), it would be ...

  1. <5ms CPU time limit
  2. Incompatible with express.js
  3. one script limitation per domain

Limitations our workload is able to conform with (YMMV)

For hosting of static files, we migrated from Firebase to CommonsHost

More details on the trade-off in between both serverless providers is in the article

8 upvotes·6.5K views

Decision at The Coders Zone about Postman, Stripe Billing, CloudFlare

Avatar of pauladams
Founder; CEO; Lead Full Stack Developer at The Coders Zone ·

We have used CloudFlare ourselves for many years and have been delighted with the enhanced performance of static content on our website and security benefits (such as DDOS mitigation and the web application firewall) for our APIs and client dashboard. Stripe Billing is a straightforward solution to recurring billing and the developer-friendly API allows us to automate the billing process from start to finish. Postman a great tool for testing APIs. Life without it would be a whole lot more difficult.

7 upvotes·5.7K views

Decision at Aliadoc about Bitbucket, Visual Studio Code, Serverless, Google Cloud Storage, Google App Engine, Cloud Functions for Firebase, Firebase, CloudFlare, Create React App, React, Aliadoc

Avatar of aliadocWeb
aliadoc.com ·

In #Aliadoc, we're exploring the crowdfunding option to get traction before launch. We are building a SaaS platform for website design customization.

For the Admin UI and website editor we use React and we're currently transitioning from a Create React App setup to a custom one because our needs have become more specific. We use CloudFlare as much as possible, it's a great service.

For routing dynamic resources and proxy tasks to feed websites to the editor we leverage CloudFlare Workers for improved responsiveness. We use Firebase for our hosting needs and user authentication while also using several Cloud Functions for Firebase to interact with other services along with Google App Engine and Google Cloud Storage, but also the Real Time Database is on the radar for collaborative website editing.

We generally hate configuration but honestly because of the stage of our project we lack resources for doing heavy sysops work. So we are basically just relying on Serverless technologies as much as we can to do all server side processing.

Visual Studio Code definitively makes programming a much easier and enjoyable task, we just love it. We combine it with Bitbucket for our source code control needs.

5 upvotes·14.1K views

Decision at PRIZ Guru about DigitalOcean, CloudFlare

Avatar of AlexAg
Founder at PRIZ Guru ·

We were trying to decide what is the best approach to get SSL certificates installed on our platforms. One option, of course, was to buy a certificate, manage it, install it manually, fight all the issues, etc...

Eventually, decided to user the certificates from CloudFlare. It is free!!! no need to manage it yourself, which makes it super easy and hassle free. In terms of installation, since all of our stuff in on DigitalOcean, the easiest way to install the certificates was to terminate them on LoadBalancer. Again, the setup is really easy, and no need to manage anything on your origin host side.

3 upvotes·488 views

Decision at Washington Brown about imgix, DigitalOcean, CloudFlare

Avatar of mountainash
RMW Web Publishing ·

In mid-2018 we made a big push for speed on the site. The site, running on PHP, was taking about 7 seconds to load. The site had already been running through CloudFlare for some time but on a shared host in Sydney (which is also where most of the customers are). We found when developing the @TuffTruck site that DigitalOcean was fast - and even though it's located overseas, we still found it 2 seconds faster for Australian users. We found that some Wordpress plugins were really slowing the TTFB - with all plugins off, Wordpress would save respond 1.5-2 seconds faster. With a on/off walk through of each plugin we found 2 plugins by Ontraport (a CRM type service that some forms we populating) was the main culprit. Out they went and we built our own plugin to do push the data to them only when required. With the TTFB acceptable, we moved on to getting the complete page load time down. Turning on CloudFlare 's HTML/CSS/JS minifications & Rocket Loader we could get our group of test pages, including the homepage, loading [in full] in just over 2 seconds. We then moved the images off to imgix and put the CSS, JS and Fonts onto a mirrored subdomain (so that cookies weren't exchanged), but this only shaved about another 0.2 seconds off. We are keeping it running for the moment, but the $10 minimum a month for imgix is hardly worth it (would be different if new images were going up all the time and needed processing). The client is overly happy with the ~70% improvement and has already seen the site move up the ranks of Google's SERP and bring down their PPC costs. AND all the new hosting providers still come in at half the price of the previous Sydney hosting service. We have a few ideas that we are testing on our staging site and will roll these out soon.

2 upvotes·1.7K views

Decision about imgix, DigitalOcean, CloudFlare

Avatar of mountainash
RMW Web Publishing ·

In mid-2018 we made a big push for speed on the site. The site, running on PHP, was taking about 7 seconds to load. The site had already been running through CloudFlare for some time but on a shared host in Sydney (which is also where most of the customers are). We found when developing the @TuffTruck site that DigitalOcean was fast - and even though it's located overseas, we still found it 2 seconds faster for Australian users. We found that some Wordpress plugins were really slowing the TTFB - with all plugins off, Wordpress would save respond 1.5-2 seconds faster. With a on/off walk through of each plugin we found 2 plugins by Ontraport (a CRM type service that some forms we populating) was the main culprit. Out they went and we built our own plugin to do push the data to them only when required. With the TTFB acceptable, we moved on to getting the complete page load time down. Turning on CloudFlare 's HTML/CSS/JS minifications & Rocket Loader we could get our group of test pages, including the homepage, loading [in full] in just over 2 seconds. We then moved the images off to imgix and put the CSS, JS and Fonts onto a mirrored subdomain (so that cookies weren't exchanged), but this only shaved about another 0.2 seconds off. We are keeping it running for the moment, but the $10 minimum a month for imgix is hardly worth it (would be different if new images were going up all the time and needed processing). The client is overly happy with the ~70% improvement and has already seen the site move up the ranks of Google's SERP and bring down their PPC costs. AND all the new hosting providers still come in at half the price of the previous Sydney hosting service. We have a few ideas that we are testing on our staging site and will roll these out soon.

1 upvote·1.7K views