Alternatives to cPanel logo

Alternatives to cPanel

WordPress, Plesk, DirectAdmin, Runcloud, and phpMyAdmin are the most popular alternatives and competitors to cPanel.
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What is cPanel and what are its top alternatives?

It is an industry leading hosting platform with world-class support. It is globally empowering hosting providers through fully-automated point-and-click hosting platform by hosting-centric professionals
cPanel is a tool in the Server Configuration and Automation category of a tech stack.

Top Alternatives to cPanel

  • WordPress

    WordPress

    The core software is built by hundreds of community volunteers, and when you’re ready for more there are thousands of plugins and themes available to transform your site into almost anything you can imagine. Over 60 million people have chosen WordPress to power the place on the web they call “home” — we’d love you to join the family. ...

  • Plesk

    Plesk

    Build and manage multiple sites from a single dashboard. You can also run updates, monitor performance and onboard new prospects all from the same place. It is a WebOps platform to run, automate and grow applications, websites and hosting businesses. ...

  • DirectAdmin

    DirectAdmin

    It is a graphical web-based web hosting control panel designed to make administration of websites easier. It is an extremely efficient control panel that uses the bare minimum of system resources. This makes it ideal for systems ranging from low-end VPS units to heavily-loaded dedicated servers ...

  • Runcloud

    Runcloud

    SaaS based PHP cloud server control panel. Support Digital Ocean, Linode, AWS, Vultr, Azure and other custom VPS. GIT deployment webhook and easiest control panel to manage Laravel, Cake, Symphony or WordPress. ...

  • phpMyAdmin

    phpMyAdmin

    As a portable web application written primarily in PHP, it has become one of the most popular MySQL administration tools, especially for web hosting services. ...

  • Webmin

    Webmin

    It is a web-based interface for system administration for Unix. Using any modern web browser, you can setup user accounts, Apache, DNS, file sharing and much more. It removes the need to manually edit Unix configuration files. ...

  • GoDaddy

    GoDaddy

    Go Daddy makes registering Domain Names fast, simple, and affordable. It is a trusted domain registrar that empowers people with creative ideas to succeed online. ...

  • Ansible

    Ansible

    Ansible is an IT automation tool. It can configure systems, deploy software, and orchestrate more advanced IT tasks such as continuous deployments or zero downtime rolling updates. Ansible’s goals are foremost those of simplicity and maximum ease of use. ...

cPanel alternatives & related posts

WordPress logo

WordPress

83.6K
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A semantic personal publishing platform with a focus on aesthetics, web standards, and usability.
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PROS OF WORDPRESS
  • 411
    Customizable
  • 362
    Easy to manage
  • 351
    Plugins & themes
  • 258
    Non-tech colleagues can update website content
  • 246
    Really powerful
  • 144
    Rapid website development
  • 77
    Best documentation
  • 51
    Codex
  • 44
    Product feature set
  • 35
    Custom/internal social network
  • 15
    Open source
  • 8
    Great for all types of websites
  • 6
    Huge install and user base
  • 5
    Best
  • 5
    Open Source Community
  • 5
    Perfect example of user collaboration
  • 5
    It's simple and easy to use by any novice
  • 5
    Most websites make use of it
  • 5
    I like it like I like a kick in the groin
  • 4
    Community
  • 4
    API-based CMS
  • 3
    Easy To use
  • 2
    <a href="https://secure.wphackedhel">Easy Beginner</a>
CONS OF WORDPRESS
  • 12
    Plugins are of mixed quality
  • 12
    Hard to keep up-to-date if you customize things
  • 9
    Not best backend UI
  • 2
    Complex Organization
  • 1
    Great Security

related WordPress posts

Dale Ross
Independent Contractor at Self Employed · | 22 upvotes · 1M views

I've heard that I have the ability to write well, at times. When it flows, it flows. I decided to start blogging in 2013 on Blogger. I started a company and joined BizPark with the Microsoft Azure allotment. I created a WordPress blog and did a migration at some point. A lot happened in the time after that migration but I stopped coding and changed cities during tumultuous times that taught me many lessons concerning mental health and productivity. I eventually graduated from BizSpark and outgrew the credit allotment. That killed the WordPress blog.

I blogged about writing again on the existing Blogger blog but it didn't feel right. I looked at a few options where I wouldn't have to worry about hosting cost indefinitely and Jekyll stood out with GitHub Pages. The Importer was fairly straightforward for the existing blog posts.

Todo * Set up redirects for all posts on blogger. The URI format is different so a complete redirect wouldn't work. Although, there may be something in Jekyll that could manage the redirects. I did notice the old URLs were stored in the front matter. I'm working on a command-line Ruby gem for the current plan. * I did find some of the lost WordPress posts on archive.org that I downloaded with the waybackmachinedownloader. I think I might write an importer for that. * I still have a few Disqus comment threads to map

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Siddhant Sharma
Tech Connoisseur at Channelize.io · | 12 upvotes · 803K views

WordPress Magento PHP Java Swift JavaScript

Back in the days, we started looking for a date on different matrimonial websites as there were no Dating Applications. We used to create different profiles. It all changed in 2012 when Tinder, an Online Dating application came into India Market.

Tinder allowed us to communicate with our potential soul mates. That too without paying any extra money. I too got 4-6 matches in 6 years. It changed the life of many Millennials. Tinder created a revolution of its own. P.S. - I still don't have a date :(

Posting my first article. Please have a look and do give feedback.

Communication InAppChat Dating Matrimonial #messaging

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Plesk logo

Plesk

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A web hosting platform with a control panel
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PROS OF PLESK
  • 1
    Not free
  • 1
    Free
  • 1
    Reliable
  • 1
    Easy to use
CONS OF PLESK
    Be the first to leave a con

    related Plesk posts

    Shared insights
    on
    MySQLMySQLcPanelcPanelPleskPleskHostGatorHostGator

    Hello,

    I’ve been using a Reseller account to host my client's websites for many years ago.

    I noticed in the last few years low performance and weakness in technical support services, so I intended to move to another provider just like "HostGator," the problem is I'm using currently Plesk "Direct Admin" but the intended new reseller using "cPanel," the question is could I move my reseller without interrupting my clients? "No change from client-side will be performed ex (FTP accounts, control panel credentials, MySQL databases, users, DNS configuration, webmail boxes, and messages)."

    I would love your insights on where I should go. (Experienced)

    Note: I called the HostGator support, and they will make a migration manually; they also assure me that it wouldn't be any interruption, but I'm also not sure.

    See more
    DirectAdmin logo

    DirectAdmin

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    Powerful And Easy To Use Web Hosting Control Panel
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    + 1
    0
    PROS OF DIRECTADMIN
      Be the first to leave a pro
      CONS OF DIRECTADMIN
        Be the first to leave a con

        related DirectAdmin posts

        Runcloud logo

        Runcloud

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        57
        0
        PHP web application & server management panel
        20
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        + 1
        0
        PROS OF RUNCLOUD
          Be the first to leave a pro
          CONS OF RUNCLOUD
            Be the first to leave a con

            related Runcloud posts

            phpMyAdmin logo

            phpMyAdmin

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            216
            14
            A free software, for MySQL and MariaDB
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            PROS OF PHPMYADMIN
            • 5
              Easy data access
            • 5
              User administration
            • 4
              Query linter
            CONS OF PHPMYADMIN
              Be the first to leave a con

              related phpMyAdmin posts

              Webmin logo

              Webmin

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              121
              9
              A web-based system configuration tool
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              + 1
              9
              PROS OF WEBMIN
              • 2
                Review real-time resources (cpu, mem, stg, proc)
              • 1
                DNS Zone Editor
              • 1
                Modify ports and usage
              • 1
                Extensible and flexible
              • 1
                Modify applications
              • 1
                Free
              • 1
                Virtualmin
              • 1
                Easy to use
              CONS OF WEBMIN
                Be the first to leave a con

                related Webmin posts

                GoDaddy logo

                GoDaddy

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                456
                10
                Your all in one solution to grow online
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                PROS OF GODADDY
                • 7
                  Flexible payment methods for domains
                • 3
                  .io support
                CONS OF GODADDY
                • 2
                  Constantly trying to upsell you
                • 1
                  Not a great UI

                related GoDaddy posts

                Ansible logo

                Ansible

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                Radically simple configuration-management, application deployment, task-execution, and multi-node orchestration engine
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                PROS OF ANSIBLE
                • 277
                  Agentless
                • 204
                  Great configuration
                • 195
                  Simple
                • 173
                  Powerful
                • 151
                  Easy to learn
                • 66
                  Flexible
                • 54
                  Doesn't get in the way of getting s--- done
                • 34
                  Makes sense
                • 29
                  Super efficient and flexible
                • 27
                  Powerful
                • 11
                  Dynamic Inventory
                • 8
                  Backed by Red Hat
                • 7
                  Works with AWS
                • 6
                  Cloud Oriented
                • 6
                  Easy to maintain
                • 4
                  Because SSH
                • 4
                  Multi language
                • 4
                  Easy
                • 4
                  Simple
                • 4
                  Procedural or declarative, or both
                • 4
                  Simple and powerful
                • 3
                  Consistency
                • 3
                  Vagrant provisioner
                • 2
                  Fast as hell
                • 2
                  Masterless
                • 2
                  Well-documented
                • 2
                  Merge hash to get final configuration similar to hiera
                • 2
                  Debugging is simple
                • 1
                  Work on windows, but difficult to manage
                • 1
                  Certified Content
                CONS OF ANSIBLE
                • 5
                  Dangerous
                • 5
                  Hard to install
                • 3
                  Bloated
                • 3
                  Backward compatibility
                • 2
                  Doesn't Run on Windows
                • 2
                  No immutable infrastructure

                related Ansible posts

                Tymoteusz Paul
                Devops guy at X20X Development LTD · | 23 upvotes · 4.8M views

                Often enough I have to explain my way of going about setting up a CI/CD pipeline with multiple deployment platforms. Since I am a bit tired of yapping the same every single time, I've decided to write it up and share with the world this way, and send people to read it instead ;). I will explain it on "live-example" of how the Rome got built, basing that current methodology exists only of readme.md and wishes of good luck (as it usually is ;)).

                It always starts with an app, whatever it may be and reading the readmes available while Vagrant and VirtualBox is installing and updating. Following that is the first hurdle to go over - convert all the instruction/scripts into Ansible playbook(s), and only stopping when doing a clear vagrant up or vagrant reload we will have a fully working environment. As our Vagrant environment is now functional, it's time to break it! This is the moment to look for how things can be done better (too rigid/too lose versioning? Sloppy environment setup?) and replace them with the right way to do stuff, one that won't bite us in the backside. This is the point, and the best opportunity, to upcycle the existing way of doing dev environment to produce a proper, production-grade product.

                I should probably digress here for a moment and explain why. I firmly believe that the way you deploy production is the same way you should deploy develop, shy of few debugging-friendly setting. This way you avoid the discrepancy between how production work vs how development works, which almost always causes major pains in the back of the neck, and with use of proper tools should mean no more work for the developers. That's why we start with Vagrant as developer boxes should be as easy as vagrant up, but the meat of our product lies in Ansible which will do meat of the work and can be applied to almost anything: AWS, bare metal, docker, LXC, in open net, behind vpn - you name it.

                We must also give proper consideration to monitoring and logging hoovering at this point. My generic answer here is to grab Elasticsearch, Kibana, and Logstash. While for different use cases there may be better solutions, this one is well battle-tested, performs reasonably and is very easy to scale both vertically (within some limits) and horizontally. Logstash rules are easy to write and are well supported in maintenance through Ansible, which as I've mentioned earlier, are at the very core of things, and creating triggers/reports and alerts based on Elastic and Kibana is generally a breeze, including some quite complex aggregations.

                If we are happy with the state of the Ansible it's time to move on and put all those roles and playbooks to work. Namely, we need something to manage our CI/CD pipelines. For me, the choice is obvious: TeamCity. It's modern, robust and unlike most of the light-weight alternatives, it's transparent. What I mean by that is that it doesn't tell you how to do things, doesn't limit your ways to deploy, or test, or package for that matter. Instead, it provides a developer-friendly and rich playground for your pipelines. You can do most the same with Jenkins, but it has a quite dated look and feel to it, while also missing some key functionality that must be brought in via plugins (like quality REST API which comes built-in with TeamCity). It also comes with all the common-handy plugins like Slack or Apache Maven integration.

                The exact flow between CI and CD varies too greatly from one application to another to describe, so I will outline a few rules that guide me in it: 1. Make build steps as small as possible. This way when something breaks, we know exactly where, without needing to dig and root around. 2. All security credentials besides development environment must be sources from individual Vault instances. Keys to those containers should exist only on the CI/CD box and accessible by a few people (the less the better). This is pretty self-explanatory, as anything besides dev may contain sensitive data and, at times, be public-facing. Because of that appropriate security must be present. TeamCity shines in this department with excellent secrets-management. 3. Every part of the build chain shall consume and produce artifacts. If it creates nothing, it likely shouldn't be its own build. This way if any issue shows up with any environment or version, all developer has to do it is grab appropriate artifacts to reproduce the issue locally. 4. Deployment builds should be directly tied to specific Git branches/tags. This enables much easier tracking of what caused an issue, including automated identifying and tagging the author (nothing like automated regression testing!).

                Speaking of deployments, I generally try to keep it simple but also with a close eye on the wallet. Because of that, I am more than happy with AWS or another cloud provider, but also constantly peeking at the loads and do we get the value of what we are paying for. Often enough the pattern of use is not constantly erratic, but rather has a firm baseline which could be migrated away from the cloud and into bare metal boxes. That is another part where this approach strongly triumphs over the common Docker and CircleCI setup, where you are very much tied in to use cloud providers and getting out is expensive. Here to embrace bare-metal hosting all you need is a help of some container-based self-hosting software, my personal preference is with Proxmox and LXC. Following that all you must write are ansible scripts to manage hardware of Proxmox, similar way as you do for Amazon EC2 (ansible supports both greatly) and you are good to go. One does not exclude another, quite the opposite, as they can live in great synergy and cut your costs dramatically (the heavier your base load, the bigger the savings) while providing production-grade resiliency.

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                Sebastian Gębski

                Heroku was a decent choice to start a business, but at some point our platform was too big, too complex & too heterogenic, so Heroku started to be a constraint, not a benefit. First, we've started containerizing our apps with Docker to eliminate "works in my machine" syndrome & uniformize the environment setup. The first orchestration was composed with Docker Compose , but at some point it made sense to move it to Kubernetes. Fortunately, we've made a very good technical decision when starting our work with containers - all the container configuration & provisions HAD (since the beginning) to be done in code (Infrastructure as Code) - we've used Terraform & Ansible for that (correspondingly). This general trend of containerisation was accompanied by another, parallel & equally big project: migrating environments from Heroku to AWS: using Amazon EC2 , Amazon EKS, Amazon S3 & Amazon RDS.

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