Alternatives to MongoDB Compass logo

Alternatives to MongoDB Compass

Robo 3T, Atlas, Tableau, GraphQL, and MongoDB Atlas are the most popular alternatives and competitors to MongoDB Compass.
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What is MongoDB Compass and what are its top alternatives?

Visually explore your data. Run ad hoc queries in seconds. Interact with your data with full CRUD functionality. View and optimize your query performance.
MongoDB Compass is a tool in the Database Tools category of a tech stack.

Top Alternatives to MongoDB Compass

  • Robo 3T
    Robo 3T

    It is a visual tool helping you manage Database MongoDB. It is a part of free open source software supporting all of three operating systems: Windows, Linux, Mac OS. ...

  • Atlas
    Atlas

    Atlas is one foundation to manage and provide visibility to your servers, containers, VMs, configuration management, service discovery, and additional operations services. ...

  • Tableau
    Tableau

    Tableau can help anyone see and understand their data. Connect to almost any database, drag and drop to create visualizations, and share with a click. ...

  • GraphQL
    GraphQL

    GraphQL is a data query language and runtime designed and used at Facebook to request and deliver data to mobile and web apps since 2012. ...

  • MongoDB Atlas
    MongoDB Atlas

    MongoDB Atlas is a global cloud database service built and run by the team behind MongoDB. Enjoy the flexibility and scalability of a document database, with the ease and automation of a fully managed service on your preferred cloud. ...

  • Studio 3T
    Studio 3T

    It's the only MongoDB tool that provides three ways to explore data alongside powerful features like query autocompletion, polyglot code generation, a stage-by-stage aggregation query builder, import and export, SQL query support and more. ...

  • NoSQLBooster
    NoSQLBooster

    It is a shell-centric cross-platform GUI tool for MongoDB v2.6-4.0 which provides comprehensive server monitoring tools, fluent query builder, SQL query, ES2017 syntax support and true intellisense experience. ...

  • Mongoose
    Mongoose

    Let's face it, writing MongoDB validation, casting and business logic boilerplate is a drag. That's why we wrote Mongoose. Mongoose provides a straight-forward, schema-based solution to modeling your application data and includes built-in type casting, validation, query building, business logic hooks and more, out of the box. ...

MongoDB Compass alternatives & related posts

Robo 3T logo

Robo 3T

88
141
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A lightweight GUI for MongoDB
88
141
+ 1
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PROS OF ROBO 3T
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    CONS OF ROBO 3T
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      related Robo 3T posts

      Atlas logo

      Atlas

      26
      100
      0
      Develop, deploy, and maintain your application anywhere. Use one console and one workflow from development to production
      26
      100
      + 1
      0
      PROS OF ATLAS
        Be the first to leave a pro
        CONS OF ATLAS
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          related Atlas posts

          Tableau logo

          Tableau

          1K
          1.1K
          6
          Tableau helps people see and understand data.
          1K
          1.1K
          + 1
          6
          PROS OF TABLEAU
          • 4
            Capable of visualising billions of rows
          • 1
            Intuitive and easy to learn
          • 1
            Responsive
          CONS OF TABLEAU
          • 1
            Very expensive for small companies

          related Tableau posts

          Looking for the best analytics software for a medium-large-sized firm. We currently use a Microsoft SQL Server database that is analyzed in Tableau desktop/published to Tableau online for users to access dashboards. Is it worth the cost savings/time to switch over to using SSRS or Power BI? Does anyone have experience migrating from Tableau to SSRS /or Power BI? Our other option is to consider using Tableau on-premises instead of online. Using custom SQL with over 3 million rows really decreases performances and results in processing times that greatly exceed our typical experience. Thanks.

          See more
          GraphQL logo

          GraphQL

          25.3K
          21K
          298
          A data query language and runtime
          25.3K
          21K
          + 1
          298
          PROS OF GRAPHQL
          • 73
            Schemas defined by the requests made by the user
          • 62
            Will replace RESTful interfaces
          • 60
            The future of API's
          • 48
            The future of databases
          • 12
            Self-documenting
          • 11
            Get many resources in a single request
          • 5
            Ask for what you need, get exactly that
          • 4
            Query Language
          • 3
            Type system
          • 3
            Fetch different resources in one request
          • 3
            Evolve your API without versions
          • 2
            GraphiQL
          • 2
            Easy setup
          • 2
            Ease of client creation
          • 1
            "Open" document
          • 1
            Easy to learn
          • 1
            Better versioning
          • 1
            Standard
          • 1
            Backed by Facebook
          • 1
            1. Describe your data
          • 1
            Fast prototyping
          • 1
            Good for apps that query at build time. (SSR/Gatsby)
          CONS OF GRAPHQL
          • 3
            Hard to migrate from GraphQL to another technology
          • 3
            More code to type.
          • 1
            All the pros sound like NFT pitches
          • 1
            Works just like any other API at runtime
          • 1
            Takes longer to build compared to schemaless.

          related GraphQL posts

          Shared insights
          on
          Node.jsNode.jsGraphQLGraphQLMongoDBMongoDB

          I just finished the very first version of my new hobby project: #MovieGeeks. It is a minimalist online movie catalog for you to save the movies you want to see and for rating the movies you already saw. This is just the beginning as I am planning to add more features on the lines of sharing and discovery

          For the #BackEnd I decided to use Node.js , GraphQL and MongoDB:

          1. Node.js has a huge community so it will always be a safe choice in terms of libraries and finding solutions to problems you may have

          2. GraphQL because I needed to improve my skills with it and because I was never comfortable with the usual REST approach. I believe GraphQL is a better option as it feels more natural to write apis, it improves the development velocity, by definition it fixes the over-fetching and under-fetching problem that is so common on REST apis, and on top of that, the community is getting bigger and bigger.

          3. MongoDB was my choice for the database as I already have a lot of experience working on it and because, despite of some bad reputation it has acquired in the last months, I still believe it is a powerful database for at least a very long list of use cases such as the one I needed for my website

          See more
          Nick Rockwell
          SVP, Engineering at Fastly · | 44 upvotes · 1.9M views

          When I joined NYT there was already broad dissatisfaction with the LAMP (Linux Apache HTTP Server MySQL PHP) Stack and the front end framework, in particular. So, I wasn't passing judgment on it. I mean, LAMP's fine, you can do good work in LAMP. It's a little dated at this point, but it's not ... I didn't want to rip it out for its own sake, but everyone else was like, "We don't like this, it's really inflexible." And I remember from being outside the company when that was called MIT FIVE when it had launched. And been observing it from the outside, and I was like, you guys took so long to do that and you did it so carefully, and yet you're not happy with your decisions. Why is that? That was more the impetus. If we're going to do this again, how are we going to do it in a way that we're gonna get a better result?

          So we're moving quickly away from LAMP, I would say. So, right now, the new front end is React based and using Apollo. And we've been in a long, protracted, gradual rollout of the core experiences.

          React is now talking to GraphQL as a primary API. There's a Node.js back end, to the front end, which is mainly for server-side rendering, as well.

          Behind there, the main repository for the GraphQL server is a big table repository, that we call Bodega because it's a convenience store. And that reads off of a Kafka pipeline.

          See more
          MongoDB Atlas logo

          MongoDB Atlas

          699
          785
          32
          Deploy and scale a MongoDB cluster in the cloud with just a few clicks
          699
          785
          + 1
          32
          PROS OF MONGODB ATLAS
          • 9
            MongoDB SaaS for and by Mongo, makes it so easy
          • 6
            Amazon VPC peering
          • 4
            Granular role-based access controls
          • 4
            MongoDB atlas is GUItool through you can manage all DB
          • 3
            Built-in data browser
          • 3
            Use it anywhere
          • 2
            Cloud instance to be worked with
          • 1
            Simple and easy to integrate
          CONS OF MONGODB ATLAS
            Be the first to leave a con

            related MongoDB Atlas posts

            Repost

            Overview: To put it simply, we plan to use the MERN stack to build our web application. MongoDB will be used as our primary database. We will use ExpressJS alongside Node.js to set up our API endpoints. Additionally, we plan to use React to build our SPA on the client side and use Redis on the server side as our primary caching solution. Initially, while working on the project, we plan to deploy our server and client both on Heroku . However, Heroku is very limited and we will need the benefits of an Infrastructure as a Service so we will use Amazon EC2 to later deploy our final version of the application.

            Serverside: nodemon will allow us to automatically restart a running instance of our node app when files changes take place. We decided to use MongoDB because it is a non relational database which uses the Document Object Model. This allows a lot of flexibility as compared to a RDMS like SQL which requires a very structural model of data that does not change too much. Another strength of MongoDB is its ease in scalability. We will use Mongoose along side MongoDB to model our application data. Additionally, we will host our MongoDB cluster remotely on MongoDB Atlas. Bcrypt will be used to encrypt user passwords that will be stored in the DB. This is to avoid the risks of storing plain text passwords. Moreover, we will use Cloudinary to store images uploaded by the user. We will also use the Twilio SendGrid API to enable automated emails sent by our application. To protect private API endpoints, we will use JSON Web Token and Passport. Also, PayPal will be used as a payment gateway to accept payments from users.

            Client Side: As mentioned earlier, we will use React to build our SPA. React uses a virtual DOM which is very efficient in rendering a page. Also React will allow us to reuse components. Furthermore, it is very popular and there is a large community that uses React so it can be helpful if we run into issues. We also plan to make a cross platform mobile application later and using React will allow us to reuse a lot of our code with React Native. Redux will be used to manage state. Redux works great with React and will help us manage a global state in the app and avoid the complications of each component having its own state. Additionally, we will use Bootstrap components and custom CSS to style our app.

            Other: Git will be used for version control. During the later stages of our project, we will use Google Analytics to collect useful data regarding user interactions. Moreover, Slack will be our primary communication tool. Also, we will use Visual Studio Code as our primary code editor because it is very light weight and has a wide variety of extensions that will boost productivity. Postman will be used to interact with and debug our API endpoints.

            See more
            Gregory Koberger

            We went with MongoDB , almost by mistake. I had never used it before, but I knew I wanted the *EAN part of the MEAN stack, so why not go all in. I come from a background of SQL (first MySQL , then PostgreSQL ), so I definitely abused Mongo at first... by trying to turn it into something more relational than it should be. But hey, data is supposed to be relational, so there wasn't really any way to get around that.

            There's a lot I love about MongoDB, and a lot I hate. I still don't know if we made the right decision. We've been able to build much quicker, but we also have had some growing pains. We host our databases on MongoDB Atlas , and I can't say enough good things about it. We had tried MongoLab and Compose before it, and with MongoDB Atlas I finally feel like things are in a good place. I don't know if I'd use it for a one-off small project, but for a large product Atlas has given us a ton more control, stability and trust.

            See more
            Studio 3T logo

            Studio 3T

            54
            132
            0
            The professional GUI and IDE for MongoDB
            54
            132
            + 1
            0
            PROS OF STUDIO 3T
              Be the first to leave a pro
              CONS OF STUDIO 3T
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                related Studio 3T posts

                NoSQLBooster logo

                NoSQLBooster

                29
                42
                0
                MongoDB Admin GUI tool
                29
                42
                + 1
                0
                PROS OF NOSQLBOOSTER
                  Be the first to leave a pro
                  CONS OF NOSQLBOOSTER
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                    Mongoose logo

                    Mongoose

                    1.5K
                    1.2K
                    55
                    MongoDB object modeling designed to work in an asynchronous environment
                    1.5K
                    1.2K
                    + 1
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                    PROS OF MONGOOSE
                    • 17
                      Well documented
                    • 16
                      Several bad ideas mixed together
                    • 10
                      JSON
                    • 8
                      Actually terrible documentation
                    • 2
                      Recommended and used by Valve. See steamworks docs
                    • 1
                      Can be used with passportjs for oauth
                    • 1
                      Yeah
                    CONS OF MONGOOSE
                    • 3
                      Model middleware/hooks are not user friendly

                    related Mongoose posts

                    Repost

                    Overview: To put it simply, we plan to use the MERN stack to build our web application. MongoDB will be used as our primary database. We will use ExpressJS alongside Node.js to set up our API endpoints. Additionally, we plan to use React to build our SPA on the client side and use Redis on the server side as our primary caching solution. Initially, while working on the project, we plan to deploy our server and client both on Heroku . However, Heroku is very limited and we will need the benefits of an Infrastructure as a Service so we will use Amazon EC2 to later deploy our final version of the application.

                    Serverside: nodemon will allow us to automatically restart a running instance of our node app when files changes take place. We decided to use MongoDB because it is a non relational database which uses the Document Object Model. This allows a lot of flexibility as compared to a RDMS like SQL which requires a very structural model of data that does not change too much. Another strength of MongoDB is its ease in scalability. We will use Mongoose along side MongoDB to model our application data. Additionally, we will host our MongoDB cluster remotely on MongoDB Atlas. Bcrypt will be used to encrypt user passwords that will be stored in the DB. This is to avoid the risks of storing plain text passwords. Moreover, we will use Cloudinary to store images uploaded by the user. We will also use the Twilio SendGrid API to enable automated emails sent by our application. To protect private API endpoints, we will use JSON Web Token and Passport. Also, PayPal will be used as a payment gateway to accept payments from users.

                    Client Side: As mentioned earlier, we will use React to build our SPA. React uses a virtual DOM which is very efficient in rendering a page. Also React will allow us to reuse components. Furthermore, it is very popular and there is a large community that uses React so it can be helpful if we run into issues. We also plan to make a cross platform mobile application later and using React will allow us to reuse a lot of our code with React Native. Redux will be used to manage state. Redux works great with React and will help us manage a global state in the app and avoid the complications of each component having its own state. Additionally, we will use Bootstrap components and custom CSS to style our app.

                    Other: Git will be used for version control. During the later stages of our project, we will use Google Analytics to collect useful data regarding user interactions. Moreover, Slack will be our primary communication tool. Also, we will use Visual Studio Code as our primary code editor because it is very light weight and has a wide variety of extensions that will boost productivity. Postman will be used to interact with and debug our API endpoints.

                    See more

                    Overview: To put it simply, we plan to use the MERN stack to build our web application. MongoDB will be used as our primary database. We will use ExpressJS alongside Node.js to set up our API endpoints. Additionally, we plan to use React to build our SPA on the client side and use Redis on the server side as our primary caching solution. Initially, while working on the project, we plan to deploy our server and client both on Heroku. However, Heroku is very limited and we will need the benefits of an Infrastructure as a Service so we will use Amazon EC2 to later deploy our final version of the application.

                    Serverside: nodemon will allow us to automatically restart a running instance of our node app when files changes take place. We decided to use MongoDB because it is a non relational database which uses the Document Object Model. This allows a lot of flexibility as compared to a RDMS like SQL which requires a very structural model of data that does not change too much. Another strength of MongoDB is its ease in scalability. We will use Mongoose along side MongoDB to model our application data. Additionally, we will host our MongoDB cluster remotely on MongoDB Atlas. Bcrypt will be used to encrypt user passwords that will be stored in the DB. This is to avoid the risks of storing plain text passwords. Moreover, we will use Cloudinary to store images uploaded by the user. We will also use the Twilio SendGrid API to enable automated emails sent by our application. To protect private API endpoints, we will use JSON Web Token and Passport. Also, PayPal will be used as a payment gateway to accept payments from users.

                    Client Side: As mentioned earlier, we will use React to build our SPA. React uses a virtual DOM which is very efficient in rendering a page. Also React will allow us to reuse components. Furthermore, it is very popular and there is a large community that uses React so it can be helpful if we run into issues. We also plan to make a cross platform mobile application later and using React will allow us to reuse a lot of our code with React Native. Redux will be used to manage state. Redux works great with React and will help us manage a global state in the app and avoid the complications of each component having its own state. Additionally, we will use Bootstrap components and custom CSS to style our app.

                    Other: Git will be used for version control. During the later stages of our project, we will use Google Analytics to collect useful data regarding user interactions. Moreover, Slack will be our primary communication tool. Also, we will use Visual Studio Code as our primary code editor because it is very light weight and has a wide variety of extensions that will boost productivity. Postman will be used to interact with and debug our API endpoints.

                    See more