Alternatives to NSQ logo

Alternatives to NSQ

RabbitMQ, Kafka, Redis, NATS, and gRPC are the most popular alternatives and competitors to NSQ.
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What is NSQ and what are its top alternatives?

NSQ is a realtime distributed messaging platform designed to operate at scale, handling billions of messages per day. It promotes distributed and decentralized topologies without single points of failure, enabling fault tolerance and high availability coupled with a reliable message delivery guarantee. See features & guarantees.
NSQ is a tool in the Message Queue category of a tech stack.
NSQ is an open source tool with 17.5K GitHub stars and 2.3K GitHub forks. Here’s a link to NSQ's open source repository on GitHub

Top Alternatives of NSQ

NSQ alternatives & related posts

related RabbitMQ posts

James Cunningham
James Cunningham
Operations Engineer at Sentry · | 18 upvotes · 603.1K views
atSentrySentry
Celery
Celery
RabbitMQ
RabbitMQ
#MessageQueue

As Sentry runs throughout the day, there are about 50 different offline tasks that we execute—anything from “process this event, pretty please” to “send all of these cool people some emails.” There are some that we execute once a day and some that execute thousands per second.

Managing this variety requires a reliably high-throughput message-passing technology. We use Celery's RabbitMQ implementation, and we stumbled upon a great feature called Federation that allows us to partition our task queue across any number of RabbitMQ servers and gives us the confidence that, if any single server gets backlogged, others will pitch in and distribute some of the backlogged tasks to their consumers.

#MessageQueue

See more
Tim Abbott
Tim Abbott
Founder at Zulip · | 14 upvotes · 413.7K views
atZulipZulip
RabbitMQ
RabbitMQ
Python
Python
Redis
Redis

We've been using RabbitMQ as Zulip's queuing system since we needed a queuing system. What I like about it is that it scales really well and has good libraries for a wide range of platforms, including our own Python. So aside from getting it running, we've had to put basically 0 effort into making it scale for our needs.

However, there's several things that could be better about it: * It's error messages are absolutely terrible; if ever one of our users ends up getting an error with RabbitMQ (even for simple things like a misconfigured hostname), they always end up needing to get help from the Zulip team, because the errors logs are just inscrutable. As an open source project, we've handled this issue by really carefully scripting the installation to be a failure-proof configuration (in this case, setting the RabbitMQ hostname to 127.0.0.1, so that no user-controlled configuration can break it). But it was a real pain to get there and the process of determining we needed to do that caused a significant amount of pain to folks installing Zulip. * The pika library for Python takes a lot of time to startup a RabbitMQ connection; this means that Zulip server restarts are more disruptive than would be ideal. * It's annoying that you need to run the rabbitmqctl management commands as root.

But overall, I like that it has clean, clear semanstics and high scalability, and haven't been tempted to do the work to migrate to something like Redis (which has its own downsides).

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related Kafka posts

Eric Colson
Eric Colson
Chief Algorithms Officer at Stitch Fix · | 19 upvotes · 921.7K views
atStitch FixStitch Fix
Kafka
Kafka
PostgreSQL
PostgreSQL
Amazon S3
Amazon S3
Apache Spark
Apache Spark
Presto
Presto
Python
Python
R Language
R Language
PyTorch
PyTorch
Docker
Docker
Amazon EC2 Container Service
Amazon EC2 Container Service
#AWS
#Etl
#ML
#DataScience
#DataStack
#Data

The algorithms and data infrastructure at Stitch Fix is housed in #AWS. Data acquisition is split between events flowing through Kafka, and periodic snapshots of PostgreSQL DBs. We store data in an Amazon S3 based data warehouse. Apache Spark on Yarn is our tool of choice for data movement and #ETL. Because our storage layer (s3) is decoupled from our processing layer, we are able to scale our compute environment very elastically. We have several semi-permanent, autoscaling Yarn clusters running to serve our data processing needs. While the bulk of our compute infrastructure is dedicated to algorithmic processing, we also implemented Presto for adhoc queries and dashboards.

Beyond data movement and ETL, most #ML centric jobs (e.g. model training and execution) run in a similarly elastic environment as containers running Python and R code on Amazon EC2 Container Service clusters. The execution of batch jobs on top of ECS is managed by Flotilla, a service we built in house and open sourced (see https://github.com/stitchfix/flotilla-os).

At Stitch Fix, algorithmic integrations are pervasive across the business. We have dozens of data products actively integrated systems. That requires serving layer that is robust, agile, flexible, and allows for self-service. Models produced on Flotilla are packaged for deployment in production using Khan, another framework we've developed internally. Khan provides our data scientists the ability to quickly productionize those models they've developed with open source frameworks in Python 3 (e.g. PyTorch, sklearn), by automatically packaging them as Docker containers and deploying to Amazon ECS. This provides our data scientist a one-click method of getting from their algorithms to production. We then integrate those deployments into a service mesh, which allows us to A/B test various implementations in our product.

For more info:

#DataScience #DataStack #Data

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John Kodumal
John Kodumal
CTO at LaunchDarkly · | 16 upvotes · 569.7K views
atLaunchDarklyLaunchDarkly
Amazon RDS
Amazon RDS
PostgreSQL
PostgreSQL
TimescaleDB
TimescaleDB
Patroni
Patroni
Consul
Consul
Amazon ElastiCache
Amazon ElastiCache
Amazon EC2
Amazon EC2
Redis
Redis
Amazon Kinesis
Amazon Kinesis
Kafka
Kafka

As we've evolved or added additional infrastructure to our stack, we've biased towards managed services. Most new backing stores are Amazon RDS instances now. We do use self-managed PostgreSQL with TimescaleDB for time-series data—this is made HA with the use of Patroni and Consul.

We also use managed Amazon ElastiCache instances instead of spinning up Amazon EC2 instances to run Redis workloads, as well as shifting to Amazon Kinesis instead of Kafka.

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Redis logo

Redis

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15.9K
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An in-memory database that persists on disk
Redis logo
Redis
VS
NSQ logo
NSQ

related Redis posts

Robert Zuber
Robert Zuber
CTO at CircleCI · | 22 upvotes · 762.1K views
atCircleCICircleCI
MongoDB
MongoDB
PostgreSQL
PostgreSQL
Redis
Redis
GitHub
GitHub
Amazon S3
Amazon S3

We use MongoDB as our primary #datastore. Mongo's approach to replica sets enables some fantastic patterns for operations like maintenance, backups, and #ETL.

As we pull #microservices from our #monolith, we are taking the opportunity to build them with their own datastores using PostgreSQL. We also use Redis to cache data we’d never store permanently, and to rate-limit our requests to partners’ APIs (like GitHub).

When we’re dealing with large blobs of immutable data (logs, artifacts, and test results), we store them in Amazon S3. We handle any side-effects of S3’s eventual consistency model within our own code. This ensures that we deal with user requests correctly while writes are in process.

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Bryam Rodriguez
Bryam Rodriguez
Ruby
Ruby
Rails
Rails
React
React
Redux
Redux
Create React App
Create React App
Jest
Jest
react-testing-library
react-testing-library
RSpec
RSpec
PostgreSQL
PostgreSQL
MongoDB
MongoDB
Redis
Redis
React Native
React Native
Next.js
Next.js
Python
Python
Bit
Bit
JavaScript
JavaScript

I'm working as one of the engineering leads in RunaHR. As our platform is a Saas, we thought It'd be good to have an API (We chose Ruby and Rails for this) and a SPA (built with React and Redux ) connected. We started the SPA with Create React App since It's pretty easy to start.

We use Jest as the testing framework and react-testing-library to test React components. In Rails we make tests using RSpec.

Our main database is PostgreSQL, but we also use MongoDB to store some type of data. We started to use Redis  for cache and other time sensitive operations.

We have a couple of extra projects: One is an Employee app built with React Native and the other is an internal back office dashboard built with Next.js for the client and Python in the backend side.

Since we have different frontend apps we have found useful to have Bit to document visual components and utils in JavaScript.

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NATS logo

NATS

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Lightweight publish-subscribe & distributed queueing messaging system
NATS logo
NATS
VS
NSQ logo
NSQ
gRPC logo

gRPC

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A high performance, open-source universal RPC framework
gRPC logo
gRPC
VS
NSQ logo
NSQ

related gRPC posts

StackShare Editors
StackShare Editors
Kafka
Kafka
gRPC
gRPC

By mid-2015, Uber’s rider growth coupled with its cadence of releasing new services, like Eats and Freight, was pressuring the infrastructure. To allow the decoupling of consumption from production, and to add an abstraction layer between users, developers, and infrastructure, Uber built Catalyst, a serverless internal service mesh.

Uber decided to build their own severless solution, rather that using something like AWS Lambda, speed for its global production environments as well as introspectability.

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related Amazon SQS posts

Tim Specht
Tim Specht
‎Co-Founder and CTO at Dubsmash · | 14 upvotes · 416.1K views
atDubsmashDubsmash
Google Analytics
Google Analytics
Amazon Kinesis
Amazon Kinesis
AWS Lambda
AWS Lambda
Amazon SQS
Amazon SQS
Google BigQuery
Google BigQuery
#ServerlessTaskProcessing
#GeneralAnalytics
#RealTimeDataProcessing
#BigDataAsAService

In order to accurately measure & track user behaviour on our platform we moved over quickly from the initial solution using Google Analytics to a custom-built one due to resource & pricing concerns we had.

While this does sound complicated, it’s as easy as clients sending JSON blobs of events to Amazon Kinesis from where we use AWS Lambda & Amazon SQS to batch and process incoming events and then ingest them into Google BigQuery. Once events are stored in BigQuery (which usually only takes a second from the time the client sends the data until it’s available), we can use almost-standard-SQL to simply query for data while Google makes sure that, even with terabytes of data being scanned, query times stay in the range of seconds rather than hours. Before ingesting their data into the pipeline, our mobile clients are aggregating events internally and, once a certain threshold is reached or the app is going to the background, sending the events as a JSON blob into the stream.

In the past we had workers running that continuously read from the stream and would validate and post-process the data and then enqueue them for other workers to write them to BigQuery. We went ahead and implemented the Lambda-based approach in such a way that Lambda functions would automatically be triggered for incoming records, pre-aggregate events, and write them back to SQS, from which we then read them, and persist the events to BigQuery. While this approach had a couple of bumps on the road, like re-triggering functions asynchronously to keep up with the stream and proper batch sizes, we finally managed to get it running in a reliable way and are very happy with this solution today.

#ServerlessTaskProcessing #GeneralAnalytics #RealTimeDataProcessing #BigDataAsAService

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Praveen Mooli
Praveen Mooli
Engineering Manager at Taylor and Francis · | 12 upvotes · 786.5K views
MongoDB Atlas
MongoDB Atlas
Java
Java
Spring Boot
Spring Boot
Node.js
Node.js
ExpressJS
ExpressJS
Python
Python
Flask
Flask
Amazon Kinesis
Amazon Kinesis
Amazon Kinesis Firehose
Amazon Kinesis Firehose
Amazon SNS
Amazon SNS
Amazon SQS
Amazon SQS
AWS Lambda
AWS Lambda
Angular 2
Angular 2
RxJS
RxJS
GitHub
GitHub
Travis CI
Travis CI
Terraform
Terraform
Docker
Docker
Serverless
Serverless
Amazon RDS
Amazon RDS
Amazon DynamoDB
Amazon DynamoDB
Amazon S3
Amazon S3
#Backend
#Microservices
#Eventsourcingframework
#Webapps
#Devops
#Data

We are in the process of building a modern content platform to deliver our content through various channels. We decided to go with Microservices architecture as we wanted scale. Microservice architecture style is an approach to developing an application as a suite of small independently deployable services built around specific business capabilities. You can gain modularity, extensive parallelism and cost-effective scaling by deploying services across many distributed servers. Microservices modularity facilitates independent updates/deployments, and helps to avoid single point of failure, which can help prevent large-scale outages. We also decided to use Event Driven Architecture pattern which is a popular distributed asynchronous architecture pattern used to produce highly scalable applications. The event-driven architecture is made up of highly decoupled, single-purpose event processing components that asynchronously receive and process events.

To build our #Backend capabilities we decided to use the following: 1. #Microservices - Java with Spring Boot , Node.js with ExpressJS and Python with Flask 2. #Eventsourcingframework - Amazon Kinesis , Amazon Kinesis Firehose , Amazon SNS , Amazon SQS, AWS Lambda 3. #Data - Amazon RDS , Amazon DynamoDB , Amazon S3 , MongoDB Atlas

To build #Webapps we decided to use Angular 2 with RxJS

#Devops - GitHub , Travis CI , Terraform , Docker , Serverless

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related Celery posts

James Cunningham
James Cunningham
Operations Engineer at Sentry · | 18 upvotes · 603.1K views
atSentrySentry
Celery
Celery
RabbitMQ
RabbitMQ
#MessageQueue

As Sentry runs throughout the day, there are about 50 different offline tasks that we execute—anything from “process this event, pretty please” to “send all of these cool people some emails.” There are some that we execute once a day and some that execute thousands per second.

Managing this variety requires a reliably high-throughput message-passing technology. We use Celery's RabbitMQ implementation, and we stumbled upon a great feature called Federation that allows us to partition our task queue across any number of RabbitMQ servers and gives us the confidence that, if any single server gets backlogged, others will pitch in and distribute some of the backlogged tasks to their consumers.

#MessageQueue

See more
Michael Mota
Michael Mota
Founder at AlterEstate · | 5 upvotes · 170.3K views
atAlterEstateAlterEstate
Celery
Celery
RabbitMQ
RabbitMQ
Django
Django

Automations are what makes a CRM powerful. With Celery and RabbitMQ we've been able to make powerful automations that truly works for our clients. Such as for example, automatic daily reports, reminders for their activities, important notifications regarding their client activities and actions on the website and more.

We use Celery basically for everything that needs to be scheduled for the future, and using RabbitMQ as our Queue-broker is amazing since it fully integrates with Django and Celery storing on our database results of the tasks done so we can see if anything fails immediately.

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ActiveMQ logo

ActiveMQ

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A message broker written in Java together with a full JMS client
ActiveMQ logo
ActiveMQ
VS
NSQ logo
NSQ

related ActiveMQ posts

Naushad Warsi
Naushad Warsi
software developer at klingelnberg · | 1 upvotes · 271K views
ActiveMQ
ActiveMQ
RabbitMQ
RabbitMQ

I use ActiveMQ because RabbitMQ have stopped giving the support for AMQP 1.0 or above version and the earlier version of AMQP doesn't give the functionality to support OAuth.

If OAuth is not required and we can go with AMQP 0.9 then i still recommend rabbitMq.

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