Alternatives to Storybook logo

Alternatives to Storybook

React Sketch.app, React Storybook, Bit, Pattern Lab, and Figma are the most popular alternatives and competitors to Storybook.
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What is Storybook and what are its top alternatives?

It is an open source tool for developing UI components in isolation for React, Vue, and Angular. It makes building stunning UIs organized and efficient.
Storybook is a tool in the JavaScript Framework Components category of a tech stack.
Storybook is an open source tool with 55.1K GitHub stars and 5.6K GitHub forks. Here’s a link to Storybook's open source repository on GitHub

Top Alternatives to Storybook

  • React Sketch.app

    React Sketch.app

    Managing the assets of design systems in Sketch is complex, error-prone and time consuming. Sketch is scriptable, but the API often changes. React provides the perfect wrapper to build reusable documents in a way already familiar to JavaScript developers. ...

  • React Storybook

    React Storybook

    You just load your UI components into the React Storybook and start developing them. This functionality allows you to develop UI components rapidly without worrying about the app. It will improve your team’s collaboration and feedback loop. ...

  • Bit

    Bit

    It is open source tool that helps you easily publish and manage reusable components. It help teams scale shared components to hundreds and even thousands of components, while eliminating the overhead around this process. ...

  • Pattern Lab

    Pattern Lab

    It helps you and your team build thoughtful, pattern-driven user interfaces using atomic design principles. ...

  • Figma

    Figma

    Figma is the first interface design tool with real-time collaboration. It keeps everyone on the same page. Focus on the work instead of fighting your tools. ...

  • Material-UI

    Material-UI

    It is a comprehensive guide for visual, motion, and interaction design across platforms and devices. ...

  • Cypress

    Cypress

    Cypress is a front end automated testing application created for the modern web. Cypress is built on a new architecture and runs in the same run-loop as the application being tested. As a result Cypress provides better, faster, and more reliable testing for anything that runs in a browser. Cypress works on any front-end framework or website. ...

  • React Router

    React Router

    React Router is a complete routing solution designed specifically for React.js. It painlessly synchronizes the components of your application with the URL, with first-class support for nesting, transitions, and server side rendering. ...

Storybook alternatives & related posts

React Sketch.app logo

React Sketch.app

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Render React components to Sketch ⚛️💎
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PROS OF REACT SKETCH.APP
    No pros available
    CONS OF REACT SKETCH.APP
      No cons available

      related React Sketch.app posts

      React Storybook logo

      React Storybook

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      Develop and design React components without an app
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      PROS OF REACT STORYBOOK
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        CONS OF REACT STORYBOOK
          No cons available

          related React Storybook posts

          Bit logo

          Bit

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          An open source tool for code sharing
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          PROS OF BIT
            No pros available
            CONS OF BIT
              No cons available

              related Bit posts

              Pattern Lab logo

              Pattern Lab

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              Create atomic design systems with it
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              PROS OF PATTERN LAB
                No pros available
                CONS OF PATTERN LAB
                  No cons available

                  related Pattern Lab posts

                  related Figma posts

                  Adam Neary

                  The tool we use for editing UI is React Storybook. It is the perfect place to make sure your work aligns with designs to the pixel across breakpoints. You get fast hot module reloading and a couple checkboxes to enable/disable browser features like Flexbox.

                  The only tricks I apply to Storybook are loading the stories with the mock data we’ve extracted from the API. If your mock data really covers all the various various possible states for your UI, you are good to go. Beyond that, if you have alternative states you want to account for, perhaps loading or error states, you can add them in manually.

                  This is the crux of the matter for Storybook. This file is entirely generated from Yeoman (discussed below), and it delivers the examples from the Alps Journey by default. getSectionsFromJourney() just filters the sections.

                  One other hack you’ll notice is that I added a pair of divs to bookend my component vertically, since Storybook renders with whitespace around the component. That is fine for buttons or UI with borders, but it’s hard to tell precisely where your component starts and ends, so I hacked them in there.

                  Since we are talking about how all these fabulous tools work so well together to help you be productive, can I just say what a delight it is to work on UI with Zeplin or Figma side by side with Storybook. Digging into UI in this abstract way takes all the chaos of this madcap world away one breakpoint at a time, and in that quiet realm, you are good down to the pixel every time.

                  To supply Storybook and our unit tests with realistic mock data, we want to extract the mock data directly from our Shared Development Environment. As with codegen, even a small change in a query fragment should also trigger many small changes in mock data. And here, similarly, the hard part is tackled entirely by Apollo CLI, and you can stitch it together with your own code in no time.

                  Coming back to Zeplin and Figma briefly, they're both built to allow engineers to extract content directly to facilitate product development.

                  Extracting the copy for an entire paragraph is as simple as selecting the content in Zeplin and clicking the “copy” icon in the Content section of the sidebar. In the case of Zeplin, images can be extracted by selecting and clicking the “download” icon in the Assets section of the sidebar.

                  ReactDesignStack #StorybookStack #StorybookDesignStack
                  See more
                  Lucas Litton
                  Director of Strategy at DigitalSignal · | 1 upvote · 20.8K views

                  We chose Figma because of the collaboration aspect of it. We are able to work as a team to create designs for web apps, mobile apps, and alike. After creating our designs in Figma we start exporting the assets and designs over to Webflow and Supernova.

                  See more

                  related Material-UI posts

                  Adebayo Akinlaja
                  Engineering Manager at Andela · | 14 upvotes · 335.3K views

                  I picked up an idea to develop and it was no brainer I had to go with React for the frontend. I was faced with challenges when it came to what component framework to use. I had worked extensively with Material-UI but I needed something different that would offer me wider range of well customized components (I became pretty slow at styling). I brought in Evergreen after several sampling and reads online but again, after several prototype development against Evergreen—since I was using TypeScript and I had to import custom Type, it felt exhaustive. After I validated Evergreen with the designs of the idea I was developing, I also noticed I might have to do a lot of styling. I later stumbled on Material Kit, the one specifically made for React . It was promising with beautifully crafted components, most of which fits into the designs pages I had on ground.

                  A major problem of Material Kit for me is it isn't written in TypeScript and there isn't any plans to support its TypeScript version. I rolled up my sleeve and started converting their components to TypeScript and if you'll ask me, I am still on it.

                  In summary, I used the Create React App with TypeScript support and I am spending some time converting Material Kit to TypeScript before I start developing against it. All of these components are going to be hosted on Bit.

                  If you feel I am crazy or I have gotten something wrong, I'll be willing to listen to your opinion. Also, if you want to have a share of whatever TypeScript version of Material Kit I end up coming up with, let me know.

                  See more

                  related Cypress posts

                  Kamil Kowalski
                  Engineering Manager at Fresha · | 27 upvotes · 711.9K views

                  When you think about test automation, it’s crucial to make it everyone’s responsibility (not just QA Engineers'). We started with Selenium and Java, but with our platform revolving around Ruby, Elixir and JavaScript, QA Engineers were left alone to automate tests. Cypress was the answer, as we could switch to JS and simply involve more people from day one. There's a downside too, as it meant testing on Chrome only, but that was "good enough" for us + if really needed we can always cover some specific cases in a different way.

                  See more
                  Robert Zuber

                  We are in the process of adopting Next.js as our React framework and using Storybook to help build our React components in isolation. This new part of our frontend is written in TypeScript, and we use Emotion for CSS/styling. For delivering data, we use GraphQL and Apollo. Jest, Percy, and Cypress are used for testing.

                  See more
                  React Router logo

                  React Router

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                  A complete routing solution for React.js
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                  related React Router posts

                  ReactQL is a React + GraphQL front-end starter kit. #JSX is a natural way to think about building UI, and it renders to pure #HTML in the browser and on the server, making it trivial to build server-rendered Single Page Apps. GraphQL via Apollo was chosen for the data layer; #GraphQL makes it simple to request just the data your app needs, and #Apollo takes care of communicating with your API (written in any language; doesn't have to be JavaScript!), caching, and rendering to #React.

                  ReactQL is written in TypeScript to provide full types/Intellisense, and pick up hard-to-diagnose goofs that might later show up at runtime. React makes heavy use of Webpack 4 to handle transforming your code to an optimised client-side bundle, and in throws back just enough code needed for the initial render, while seamlessly handling import statements asynchronously as needed, making the payload your user downloads ultimately much smaller than trying to do it by hand.

                  React Helmet was chosen to handle <head> content, because it works universally, making it easy to throw back the correct <title> and other tags on the initial render, as well as inject new tags for subsequent client-side views.

                  styled-components, Sass, Less and PostCSS were added to give developers a choice of whether to build styles purely in React / JavaScript, or whether to defer to a #css #preprocessor. This is especially useful for interop with UI frameworks like Bootstrap, Semantic UI, Foundation, etc - ReactQL lets you mix and match #css and renders to both a static .css file during bundling as well as generates per-page <style> tags when using #StyledComponents.

                  React Router handles routing, because it works both on the server and in the client. ReactQL customises it further by capturing non-200 responses on the server, redirecting or throwing back custom 404 pages as needed.

                  Koa is the web server that handles all incoming HTTP requests, because it's fast (TTFB < 5ms, even after fully rendering React), and its natively #async, making it easy to async/await inside routes and middleware.

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