JavaScript

JavaScript

Application and Data / Languages & Frameworks / Languages
Software engineer at Typeform·
Shared insights
at
  • Go because it's easy and simple, facilitates collaboration , and also it's fast, scalable, powerful.
  • Visual Studio Code because it has one of the most sophisticated Go language support plugins.
  • Vim because it's Vim
  • Git because it's Git
  • Docker and Docker Compose because it's quick and easy to have reproducible builds/tests with them
  • Arch Linux because Docker for Mac/Win is a disaster for the human nervous system, and Arch is the coolest Linux distro so far
  • Stack Overflow because of Copy-Paste Driven Development
  • JavaScript and Python when a something needs to be coded for yesterday
  • PhpStorm because it saves me like 300 "Ctrl+F" key strokes a minute
  • cURL because terminal all the way
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12 upvotes·439.9K views
Shared insights

All of our Frontend code is written in ECMAScript 6 using React/Redux, running on Node.js JavaScript

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4 upvotes·61K views
Engineering Lead at Katana MRP·
Shared insights
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We undertook the task of building a manufacturing ERP for small branded manufacturers. We needed to build a lot, fast with a small team, and have clear focus on product delivery. We chose JavaScript / Node.js ( React + LoopBack full stack) , Heroku and Heroku Postgres (also Heroku Redis ) . This decision has guided us to picking other key technologies. It has granted us high pace of product delivery and service availability while operating with a small team.

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Makings of a Katana (katanamrp.com)
8 upvotes·148.3K views
Senior Software Engineer at Palinode LLC·
Shared insights

As developer at Applied Health Analytics we decided to create a React Native App. In terms of #IDE I'm a good fan of PhpStorm cause we have a lot of PHP in the backend, but I've definitely gave a try to Visual Studio Code and now is my primary JavaScript #IDE. I was impress how fast VS Code has become the No.1 @JavaScript Editor in the community.

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6 upvotes·2 comments·190.2K views
Ravi Kumar
Ravi Kumar
·
February 10th 2021 at 2:21PM

Thanks for sharing this informative content, Great work.

To crack Scrum master interview: https://leanpitch.com/blogs/scrum-master-interview-questions

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SAAD SHAFEEQ ABDUL JABBAR AL TEKREETI
SAAD SHAFEEQ ABDUL JABBAR AL TEKREETI
·
August 9th 2022 at 10:09AM

who to macke mining bitcoin by githab and travis=ci ?

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Engineering Lead at Katana MRP·
Shared insights
at
()

Sometimes #ad-blocking addons can cause a real headache when working with JavaScript apps. Onboarding assistants (Appcues + elevio ), chat (Intercom) and product usage insight (Hotjar) have all landed on their blacklists. I guess there is a perfectly good reason for this that I just don't know.

In order to fix this, we had to set up our own content delivery service. We chose Amazon CloudFront and Amazon S3 to do the job because it has a good synergy with Heroku PaaS we are already using.

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8 upvotes·227.7K views
Needs advice
on
TypeScriptTypeScript
and
Flow (JS)Flow (JS)

From a StackShare community member: "We are looking to rewrite our outdated front-end with TypeScript. Right now we have a mix of CoffeeScript and vanilla JavaScript. I have read that adopting TypeScript can help enforce better code quality, and best practices. I also heard good things about Flow (JS). Which one would you recommend and why?"

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7 upvotes·200.2K views
Replies (14)
Recommends
TypeScript

I use TypeScript because:

  • incredible developer tooling and community support
  • actively developed and supported by Microsoft (yes, I like Microsoft) ;)
  • easier to make sense of a TS codebase because the annotations provide so much more context than plain JS
  • refactors become easier (VSCode has superb support for TS)

I've switched back and forth between TS and Flow and decided a year ago to abandon Flow completely in favor of TS. I don't want to bash Flow, however, my main grievances are very poor tooling (editor integration leaves much to be desired), a slower release cycle, and subpar docs and community support.

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18 upvotes·97.1K views
Recommends
TypeScript

I use TypeScript because it isn't just about validating the types I'm expecting to receive though that is a huge part of it too. Flow (JS) seems to be a type system only. TypeScript also allows you to use the latest features of JavaScript while also providing the type checking. To be fair to Flow (JS), I have not used it, but likely wouldn't have due to the additional features I get from TypeScript.

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11 upvotes·129.8K views
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Lead Architect at Fresha·

When you think about test automation, it’s crucial to make it everyone’s responsibility (not just QA Engineers'). We started with Selenium and Java, but with our platform revolving around Ruby, Elixir and JavaScript, QA Engineers were left alone to automate tests. Cypress was the answer, as we could switch to JS and simply involve more people from day one. There's a downside too, as it meant testing on Chrome only, but that was "good enough" for us + if really needed we can always cover some specific cases in a different way.

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28 upvotes·1 comment·1.8M views
Anand Muley
Anand Muley
·
January 23rd 2020 at 5:23AM

Tech Stacks are going to evolve and be replaced. We will have to keep up with it. Never heard a Developer asking for such a responsibility shift to QA to fix a bug. I have spent some time in an Organization and a Project where test automation responsibility was bestowed upon Developers. It turned out that we did not need any automation QA skilled person we ended up replacing them with Manual QA skilled person. Lets not push our responsibilities to others. There is a reason for keeping a Developer and QA team separate. So that the quality checks are not compromised.

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I'm working as one of the engineering leads in RunaHR. As our platform is a Saas, we thought It'd be good to have an API (We chose Ruby and Rails for this) and a SPA (built with React and Redux ) connected. We started the SPA with Create React App since It's pretty easy to start.

We use Jest as the testing framework and react-testing-library to test React components. In Rails we make tests using RSpec.

Our main database is PostgreSQL, but we also use MongoDB to store some type of data. We started to use Redis  for cache and other time sensitive operations.

We have a couple of extra projects: One is an Employee app built with React Native and the other is an internal back office dashboard built with Next.js for the client and Python in the backend side.

Since we have different frontend apps we have found useful to have Bit to document visual components and utils in JavaScript.

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21 upvotes·2.2M views
Needs advice
on
cPanelcPanelFirebaseFirebase
and
Nuxt.jsNuxt.js

I'm planning to make a web app with browser games that would be a Progressive Web App. I decided to use Vue.js as the front framework and Firebase to store basic information about users. Then I found out about Nuxt.js and I figured it could be really handy for making the project as PWA.

The thing is, that I don't know if I will need Server Side Rendering for this, I couldn't find a lot of information but from what I know, the web app doesn't need SSR to be PWA. I am not sure how this would work with JavaScript browser games made with frameworks like Phaser or melon.js. Also, I host my website on GoDaddy and I've heard that it's quite hard to set up SSR with cPanel.

So my questions are:

Should I use SSR for Progressive Web Application built with Nuxt, filled with javascript browser games that are lazily loaded, or does that not make sense? If it makes sense, would SSR work with godaddy hosting and cPanel?

Any help would be appreciated!

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7 upvotes·106.9K views
Replies (1)
Recommends
Nuxt.js

Perhaps you could generate static website with Nuxt and deploy on cPanel or some free static hosting.

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6 upvotes·2K views

I want to start a SaaS or product based company and thinking of going with the .NET family of technologies, as I have been working on it for the past 3 years. Can anyone provide insights on the pros and cons of this approach? Would I be able to run modern JavaScript frameworks on top of it like React/Vue.js/Node.js?

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16 upvotes·61.7K views
Replies (9)
Recommends
JavaScript

You can totally make JavaScript and associated frameworks work with .Net. Anyway, you'll keep the client-server and different modules in the system loosely coupled. I don't see any issue with this. Write the backend using .NET and use JavaScript for the front end.

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9 upvotes·1.5K views
Recommends
JavaScript

You should be totally fine with .NET. You would benefit immensely if you are planning to use some of the PAAS services on Microsoft Azure. Most Azure PAAS services have a first class support for .NET.

A small advantage of going with Javascript on server side would be that you get to use/learn only one language both on the frontend and the backend.

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8 upvotes·1.5K views
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