What is Amazon ElastiCache?

ElastiCache improves the performance of web applications by allowing you to retrieve information from fast, managed, in-memory caches, instead of relying entirely on slower disk-based databases. ElastiCache supports Memcached and Redis.
Amazon ElastiCache is a tool in the Managed Memcache category of a tech stack.

Who uses Amazon ElastiCache?

Companies
342 companies use Amazon ElastiCache in their tech stacks, including Airbnb, Asana, and Intuit.

Developers
79 developers use Amazon ElastiCache.

Amazon ElastiCache Integrations

Why developers like Amazon ElastiCache?

Here’s a list of reasons why companies and developers use Amazon ElastiCache
Amazon ElastiCache Reviews

Here are some stack decisions, common use cases and reviews by companies and developers who chose Amazon ElastiCache in their tech stack.

Julien DeFrance
Julien DeFrance
Full Stack Engineering Manager at ValiMail · | 16 upvotes · 68.8K views
atSmartZip
Amazon DynamoDB
Ruby
Node.js
AWS Lambda
New Relic
Amazon Elasticsearch Service
Elasticsearch
Superset
Amazon Quicksight
Amazon Redshift
Zapier
Segment
Amazon CloudFront
Memcached
Amazon ElastiCache
Amazon RDS for Aurora
MySQL
Amazon RDS
Amazon S3
Docker
Capistrano
AWS Elastic Beanstalk
Rails API
Rails
Algolia

Back in 2014, I was given an opportunity to re-architect SmartZip Analytics platform, and flagship product: SmartTargeting. This is a SaaS software helping real estate professionals keeping up with their prospects and leads in a given neighborhood/territory, finding out (thanks to predictive analytics) who's the most likely to list/sell their home, and running cross-channel marketing automation against them: direct mail, online ads, email... The company also does provide Data APIs to Enterprise customers.

I had inherited years and years of technical debt and I knew things had to change radically. The first enabler to this was to make use of the cloud and go with AWS, so we would stop re-inventing the wheel, and build around managed/scalable services.

For the SaaS product, we kept on working with Rails as this was what my team had the most knowledge in. We've however broken up the monolith and decoupled the front-end application from the backend thanks to the use of Rails API so we'd get independently scalable micro-services from now on.

Our various applications could now be deployed using AWS Elastic Beanstalk so we wouldn't waste any more efforts writing time-consuming Capistrano deployment scripts for instance. Combined with Docker so our application would run within its own container, independently from the underlying host configuration.

Storage-wise, we went with Amazon S3 and ditched any pre-existing local or network storage people used to deal with in our legacy systems. On the database side: Amazon RDS / MySQL initially. Ultimately migrated to Amazon RDS for Aurora / MySQL when it got released. Once again, here you need a managed service your cloud provider handles for you.

Future improvements / technology decisions included:

Caching: Amazon ElastiCache / Memcached CDN: Amazon CloudFront Systems Integration: Segment / Zapier Data-warehousing: Amazon Redshift BI: Amazon Quicksight / Superset Search: Elasticsearch / Amazon Elasticsearch Service / Algolia Monitoring: New Relic

As our usage grows, patterns changed, and/or our business needs evolved, my role as Engineering Manager then Director of Engineering was also to ensure my team kept on learning and innovating, while delivering on business value.

One of these innovations was to get ourselves into Serverless : Adopting AWS Lambda was a big step forward. At the time, only available for Node.js (Not Ruby ) but a great way to handle cost efficiency, unpredictable traffic, sudden bursts of traffic... Ultimately you want the whole chain of services involved in a call to be serverless, and that's when we've started leveraging Amazon DynamoDB on these projects so they'd be fully scalable.

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John Kodumal
John Kodumal
CTO at LaunchDarkly · | 14 upvotes · 27.9K views
atLaunchDarkly
Kafka
Amazon Kinesis
Redis
Amazon EC2
Amazon ElastiCache
Consul
Patroni
TimescaleDB
PostgreSQL
Amazon RDS

As we've evolved or added additional infrastructure to our stack, we've biased towards managed services. Most new backing stores are Amazon RDS instances now. We do use self-managed PostgreSQL with TimescaleDB for time-series data—this is made HA with the use of Patroni and Consul.

We also use managed Amazon ElastiCache instances instead of spinning up Amazon EC2 instances to run Redis workloads, as well as shifting to Amazon Kinesis instead of Kafka.

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Yonas Beshawred
Yonas Beshawred
CEO at StackShare · | 9 upvotes · 13.6K views
atStackShare
Memcached
Heroku
Amazon ElastiCache
Rails
PostgreSQL
MemCachier
#RailsCaching
#Caching

We decided to use MemCachier as our Memcached provider because we were seeing some serious PostgreSQL performance issues with query-heavy pages on the site. We use MemCachier for all Rails caching and pretty aggressively too for the logged out experience (fully cached pages for the most part). We really need to move to Amazon ElastiCache as soon as possible so we can stop paying so much. The only reason we're not moving is because there are some restrictions on the network side due to our main app being hosted on Heroku.

#Caching #RailsCaching

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Amazon ElastiCache
Amazon Elasticsearch Service
AWS Elastic Load Balancing (ELB)
Memcached
Redis
Python
AWS Lambda
Amazon RDS
Microsoft SQL Server
MariaDB
Amazon RDS for PostgreSQL
Rails
Ruby
Heroku
AWS Elastic Beanstalk

We initially started out with Heroku as our PaaS provider due to a desire to use it by our original developer for our Ruby on Rails application/website at the time. We were finding response times slow, it was painfully slow, sometimes taking 10 seconds to start loading the main page. Moving up to the next "compute" level was going to be very expensive.

We moved our site over to AWS Elastic Beanstalk , not only did response times on the site practically become instant, our cloud bill for the application was cut in half.

In database world we are currently using Amazon RDS for PostgreSQL also, we have both MariaDB and Microsoft SQL Server both hosted on Amazon RDS. The plan is to migrate to AWS Aurora Serverless for all 3 of those database systems.

Additional services we use for our public applications: AWS Lambda, Python, Redis, Memcached, AWS Elastic Load Balancing (ELB), Amazon Elasticsearch Service, Amazon ElastiCache

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Chris McFadden
Chris McFadden
VP, Engineering at SparkPost · | 8 upvotes · 7.9K views
atSparkPost
Amazon Elasticsearch Service
Node.js
Amazon CloudSearch
Amazon ElastiCache
Amazon DynamoDB

We send over 20 billion emails a month on behalf of our customers. As a result, we manage hundreds of millions of "suppression" records that track when an email address is invalid as well as when a user unsubscribes or flags an email as spam. This way we can help ensure our customers are only sending email that their recipients want, which boosts overall delivery rates and engagement. We need to support two primary use cases: (1) fast and reliable real-time lookup against the list when sending email and (2) allow customers to search, edit, and bulk upload/download their list via API and in the UI. A single enterprise customer's list can be well over 100 million. Over the years as the size of this data started small and has grown increasingly we have tried multiple things that didn't scale very well. In the recent past we used Amazon DynamoDB for the system of record as well as a cache in Amazon ElastiCache (Redis) for the fast lookups and Amazon CloudSearch for the search function. This architecture was overly complicated and expensive. We were able to eliminate the use of Redis, replacing it with direct lookups against DynamoDB, fronted with a stripped down Node.js API that performs consistently around 10ms. The new dynamic bursting of DynamoDB has helped ensure reliable and consistent performance for real-time lookups. We also moved off the clunky and expensive CloudSearch to Amazon Elasticsearch Service for the search functionality. Beyond the high price tag for CloudSearch it also had severe limits streaming updates from DynamoDB, which forced us to batch them - adding extra complexity and CX challenges. We love the fact that DynamoDB can stream directly to ElasticSearch and believe using these two technologies together will handle our scaling needs in an economical way for the foreseeable future.

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Simon Bettison
Simon Bettison
Managing Director at Bettison.org Limited · | 6 upvotes · 28.9K views
atBettison.org Limited
Amazon EC2 Container Service
Docker
Amazon VPC
Amazon Route 53
Amazon SQS
Amazon SES
Amazon CloudFront
nginx
Unicorn
Ruby
Travis CI
Selenium
RSpec
Rails
Amazon ElastiCache
Redis
Sidekiq
Elasticsearch
PostgreSQL

In 2010 we made the very difficult decision to entirely re-engineer our existing monolithic LAMP application from the ground up in order to address some growing concerns about it's long term viability as a platform.

Full application re-write is almost always never the answer, because of the risks involved. However the situation warranted drastic action as it was clear that the existing product was going to face severe scaling issues. We felt it better address these sooner rather than later and also take the opportunity to improve the international architecture and also to refactor the database in. order that it better matched the changes in core functionality.

PostgreSQL was chosen for its reputation as being solid ACID compliant database backend, it was available as an offering AWS RDS service which reduced the management overhead of us having to configure it ourselves. In order to reduce read load on the primary database we implemented an Elasticsearch layer for fast and scalable search operations. Synchronisation of these indexes was to be achieved through the use of Sidekiq's Redis based background workers on Amazon ElastiCache. Again the AWS solution here looked to be an easy way to keep our involvement in managing this part of the platform at a minimum. Allowing us to focus on our core business.

Rails ls was chosen for its ability to quickly get core functionality up and running, its MVC architecture and also its focus on Test Driven Development using RSpec and Selenium with Travis CI providing continual integration. We also liked Ruby for its terse, clean and elegant syntax. Though YMMV on that one!

Unicorn was chosen for its continual deployment and reputation as a reliable application server, nginx for its reputation as a fast and stable reverse-proxy. We also took advantage of the Amazon CloudFront CDN here to further improve performance by caching static assets globally.

We tried to strike a balance between having control over management and configuration of our core application with the convenience of being able to leverage AWS hosted services for ancillary functions (Amazon SES , Amazon SQS Amazon Route 53 all hosted securely inside Amazon VPC of course!).

Whilst there is some compromise here with potential vendor lock in, the tasks being performed by these ancillary services are no particularly specialised which should mitigate this risk. Furthermore we have already containerised the stack in our development using Docker environment, and looking to how best to bring this into production - potentially using Amazon EC2 Container Service

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Amazon ElastiCache's features

  • Support for two engines: Memcached and Redis
  • Ease of management via the AWS Management Console. With a few clicks you can configure and launch instances for the engine you wish to use.
  • Compatibility with the specific engine protocol. This means most of the client libraries will work with the respective engines they were built for - no additional changes or tweaking required.
  • Detailed monitoring statistics for the engine nodes at no extra cost via Amazon CloudWatch
  • Pay only for the resources you consume based on node hours used

Amazon ElastiCache Alternatives & Comparisons

What are some alternatives to Amazon ElastiCache?
Redis
Redis is an open source, BSD licensed, advanced key-value store. It is often referred to as a data structure server since keys can contain strings, hashes, lists, sets and sorted sets.
Elasticsearch
Elasticsearch is a distributed, RESTful search and analytics engine capable of storing data and searching it in near real time. Elasticsearch, Kibana, Beats and Logstash are the Elastic Stack (sometimes called the ELK Stack).
Memcached
Memcached is an in-memory key-value store for small chunks of arbitrary data (strings, objects) from results of database calls, API calls, or page rendering.
MemCachier
MemCachier provides an easy and powerful managed caching solution for all your performance and scalability needs. It works with the ubiquitous memcache protocol so your favourite language and framework already supports it.
Memcached Cloud
Memcached Cloud is a fully-managed service for running your Memcached in a reliable and fail-safe manner. Your dataset is constantly replicated, so if a node fails, an auto-switchover mechanism guarantees data is served without interruption. Memcached Cloud provides various data persistence options as well as remote backups for disaster recovery purposes.
See all alternatives

Amazon ElastiCache's Stats

- No public GitHub repository available -