Alternatives to EventBus logo

Alternatives to EventBus

RxJava, Otto, RxJS, vuex, and Gradle are the most popular alternatives and competitors to EventBus.
22
18
+ 1
0

What is EventBus and what are its top alternatives?

It enables central communication to decoupled classes with just a few lines of code – simplifying the code, removing dependencies, and speeding up app development.
EventBus is a tool in the Java Build Tools category of a tech stack.
EventBus is an open source tool with 23K GitHub stars and 4.5K GitHub forks. Here’s a link to EventBus's open source repository on GitHub

Top Alternatives to EventBus

  • RxJava

    RxJava

    A library for composing asynchronous and event-based programs by using observable sequences for the Java VM. ...

  • Otto

    Otto

    Otto automatically builds development environments without any configuration; it can detect your project type and has built-in knowledge of industry-standard tools to setup a development environment that is ready to go. When you're ready to deploy, otto builds and manages an infrastructure, sets up servers, builds, and deploys the application. ...

  • RxJS

    RxJS

    RxJS is a library for reactive programming using Observables, to make it easier to compose asynchronous or callback-based code. This project is a rewrite of Reactive-Extensions/RxJS with better performance, better modularity, better debuggable call stacks, while staying mostly backwards compatible, with some breaking changes that reduce the API surface. ...

  • vuex

    vuex

    Vuex is a state management pattern + library for Vue.js applications. It serves as a centralized store for all the components in an application, with rules ensuring that the state can only be mutated in a predictable fashion. It also integrates with Vue's official devtools extension to provide advanced features such as zero-config time-travel debugging and state snapshot export / import. ...

  • Gradle

    Gradle

    Gradle is a build tool with a focus on build automation and support for multi-language development. If you are building, testing, publishing, and deploying software on any platform, Gradle offers a flexible model that can support the entire development lifecycle from compiling and packaging code to publishing web sites. ...

  • Apache Maven

    Apache Maven

    Maven allows a project to build using its project object model (POM) and a set of plugins that are shared by all projects using Maven, providing a uniform build system. Once you familiarize yourself with how one Maven project builds you automatically know how all Maven projects build saving you immense amounts of time when trying to navigate many projects. ...

  • Java 8

    Java 8

    It is a revolutionary release of the world’s no 1 development platform. It includes a huge upgrade to the Java programming model and a coordinated evolution of the JVM, Java language, and libraries. Java 8 includes features for productivity, ease of use, improved polyglot programming, security and improved performance. ...

  • CMake

    CMake

    It is used to control the software compilation process using simple platform and compiler independent configuration files, and generate native makefiles and workspaces that can be used in the compiler environment of the user's choice. ...

EventBus alternatives & related posts

RxJava logo

RxJava

215
115
1
Reactive Extensions for the JVM
215
115
+ 1
1
CONS OF RXJAVA
    No cons available

    related RxJava posts

    Otto logo

    Otto

    25
    84
    18
    Development and Deployment Made Easy. The successor to Vagrant
    25
    84
    + 1
    18
    CONS OF OTTO
      No cons available

      related Otto posts

      vuex logo

      vuex

      866
      684
      7
      Centralized State Management for Vue.js.
      866
      684
      + 1
      7

      related vuex posts

      Simon Reymann
      Senior Fullstack Developer at QUANTUSflow Software GmbH · | 18 upvotes · 406.3K views

      Our whole Vue.js frontend stack (incl. SSR) consists of the following tools:

      • Nuxt.js consisting of Vue CLI, Vue Router, vuex, Webpack and Sass (Bundler for HTML5, CSS 3), Babel (Transpiler for JavaScript),
      • Vue Styleguidist as our style guide and pool of developed Vue.js components
      • Vuetify as Material Component Framework (for fast app development)
      • TypeScript as programming language
      • Apollo / GraphQL (incl. GraphiQL) for data access layer (https://apollo.vuejs.org/)
      • ESLint, TSLint and Prettier for coding style and code analyzes
      • Jest as testing framework
      • Google Fonts and Font Awesome for typography and icon toolkit
      • NativeScript-Vue for mobile development

      The main reason we have chosen Vue.js over React and AngularJS is related to the following artifacts:

      • Empowered HTML. Vue.js has many similar approaches with Angular. This helps to optimize HTML blocks handling with the use of different components.
      • Detailed documentation. Vue.js has very good documentation which can fasten learning curve for developers.
      • Adaptability. It provides a rapid switching period from other frameworks. It has similarities with Angular and React in terms of design and architecture.
      • Awesome integration. Vue.js can be used for both building single-page applications and more difficult web interfaces of apps. Smaller interactive parts can be easily integrated into the existing infrastructure with no negative effect on the entire system.
      • Large scaling. Vue.js can help to develop pretty large reusable templates.
      • Tiny size. Vue.js weights around 20KB keeping its speed and flexibility. It allows reaching much better performance in comparison to other frameworks.
      See more
      Tim Nolet
      Founder, Engineer & Dishwasher at Checkly · | 11 upvotes · 57.8K views

      Vue.js Intercom JavaScript Node.js vuex Vue Router

      My SaaS recently switched to Intercom for all customer support and communication. To get the most out of Intercom, you need to integrate it with your app. This means instrumenting some code and tweaking some bits of your app's navigation. Checkly is a 100% Vue.js app, so in this post we'll look at the following:

      • Identifying a user with some handy attributes
      • Getting page views right with Vue Router
      • Sending events with Vuex
      • Some nice things you can now do in Intercom

      After finishing this integration, you can actively segment your customers into trial, lapsed, active etc. etc.

      See more

      related Gradle posts

      Shared insights
      on
      Apache Maven
      Gradle
      at

      We use Apache Maven because it is a standard. Gradle is very good alternative, but Gradle doesn't provide any advantage for our project. Gradle is slower (without running daemon), need more resources and a learning curve is quite big. Our project can not use a great flexibility of Gradle. On the other hand, Maven is well-know tool integrated in many IDEs, Dockers and so on.

      See more
      Application & Data

      Java JavaScript Node.js nginx Ubuntu MongoDB Amazon EC2 Redis Amazon S3 AWS Lambda RabbitMQ Kafka MySQL Spring Boot Dropwizard Vue.js Flutter

      Utilities

      Google Analytics Elasticsearch Amazon Route 53

      DevOps

      GitHub Docker Webpack CircleCI Jenkins Travis CI Gradle Apache Maven

      Cooperation Tools

      Jira notion.so Trello

      See more

      related Apache Maven posts

      Tymoteusz Paul
      Devops guy at X20X Development LTD · | 21 upvotes · 3.8M views

      Often enough I have to explain my way of going about setting up a CI/CD pipeline with multiple deployment platforms. Since I am a bit tired of yapping the same every single time, I've decided to write it up and share with the world this way, and send people to read it instead ;). I will explain it on "live-example" of how the Rome got built, basing that current methodology exists only of readme.md and wishes of good luck (as it usually is ;)).

      It always starts with an app, whatever it may be and reading the readmes available while Vagrant and VirtualBox is installing and updating. Following that is the first hurdle to go over - convert all the instruction/scripts into Ansible playbook(s), and only stopping when doing a clear vagrant up or vagrant reload we will have a fully working environment. As our Vagrant environment is now functional, it's time to break it! This is the moment to look for how things can be done better (too rigid/too lose versioning? Sloppy environment setup?) and replace them with the right way to do stuff, one that won't bite us in the backside. This is the point, and the best opportunity, to upcycle the existing way of doing dev environment to produce a proper, production-grade product.

      I should probably digress here for a moment and explain why. I firmly believe that the way you deploy production is the same way you should deploy develop, shy of few debugging-friendly setting. This way you avoid the discrepancy between how production work vs how development works, which almost always causes major pains in the back of the neck, and with use of proper tools should mean no more work for the developers. That's why we start with Vagrant as developer boxes should be as easy as vagrant up, but the meat of our product lies in Ansible which will do meat of the work and can be applied to almost anything: AWS, bare metal, docker, LXC, in open net, behind vpn - you name it.

      We must also give proper consideration to monitoring and logging hoovering at this point. My generic answer here is to grab Elasticsearch, Kibana, and Logstash. While for different use cases there may be better solutions, this one is well battle-tested, performs reasonably and is very easy to scale both vertically (within some limits) and horizontally. Logstash rules are easy to write and are well supported in maintenance through Ansible, which as I've mentioned earlier, are at the very core of things, and creating triggers/reports and alerts based on Elastic and Kibana is generally a breeze, including some quite complex aggregations.

      If we are happy with the state of the Ansible it's time to move on and put all those roles and playbooks to work. Namely, we need something to manage our CI/CD pipelines. For me, the choice is obvious: TeamCity. It's modern, robust and unlike most of the light-weight alternatives, it's transparent. What I mean by that is that it doesn't tell you how to do things, doesn't limit your ways to deploy, or test, or package for that matter. Instead, it provides a developer-friendly and rich playground for your pipelines. You can do most the same with Jenkins, but it has a quite dated look and feel to it, while also missing some key functionality that must be brought in via plugins (like quality REST API which comes built-in with TeamCity). It also comes with all the common-handy plugins like Slack or Apache Maven integration.

      The exact flow between CI and CD varies too greatly from one application to another to describe, so I will outline a few rules that guide me in it: 1. Make build steps as small as possible. This way when something breaks, we know exactly where, without needing to dig and root around. 2. All security credentials besides development environment must be sources from individual Vault instances. Keys to those containers should exist only on the CI/CD box and accessible by a few people (the less the better). This is pretty self-explanatory, as anything besides dev may contain sensitive data and, at times, be public-facing. Because of that appropriate security must be present. TeamCity shines in this department with excellent secrets-management. 3. Every part of the build chain shall consume and produce artifacts. If it creates nothing, it likely shouldn't be its own build. This way if any issue shows up with any environment or version, all developer has to do it is grab appropriate artifacts to reproduce the issue locally. 4. Deployment builds should be directly tied to specific Git branches/tags. This enables much easier tracking of what caused an issue, including automated identifying and tagging the author (nothing like automated regression testing!).

      Speaking of deployments, I generally try to keep it simple but also with a close eye on the wallet. Because of that, I am more than happy with AWS or another cloud provider, but also constantly peeking at the loads and do we get the value of what we are paying for. Often enough the pattern of use is not constantly erratic, but rather has a firm baseline which could be migrated away from the cloud and into bare metal boxes. That is another part where this approach strongly triumphs over the common Docker and CircleCI setup, where you are very much tied in to use cloud providers and getting out is expensive. Here to embrace bare-metal hosting all you need is a help of some container-based self-hosting software, my personal preference is with Proxmox and LXC. Following that all you must write are ansible scripts to manage hardware of Proxmox, similar way as you do for Amazon EC2 (ansible supports both greatly) and you are good to go. One does not exclude another, quite the opposite, as they can live in great synergy and cut your costs dramatically (the heavier your base load, the bigger the savings) while providing production-grade resiliency.

      See more
      Shared insights
      on
      Apache Maven
      Gradle
      at

      We use Apache Maven because it is a standard. Gradle is very good alternative, but Gradle doesn't provide any advantage for our project. Gradle is slower (without running daemon), need more resources and a learning curve is quite big. Our project can not use a great flexibility of Gradle. On the other hand, Maven is well-know tool integrated in many IDEs, Dockers and so on.

      See more
      Java 8 logo

      Java 8

      476
      385
      0
      A development environment for building applications
      476
      385
      + 1
      0
      PROS OF JAVA 8
        No pros available
        CONS OF JAVA 8
          No cons available

          related Java 8 posts

          CMake logo

          CMake

          436
          136
          1
          An open-source system that manages the build process
          436
          136
          + 1
          1
          PROS OF CMAKE
          CONS OF CMAKE
            No cons available

            related CMake posts