Alternatives to JFrog Artifactory logo
jFrog, Sonatype Nexus, BinTray, GitHub, and JitPack are the most popular alternatives and competitors to JFrog Artifactory.
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What is JFrog Artifactory?

It integrates with your existing ecosystem supporting end-to-end binary management that overcomes the complexity of working with different software package management systems, and provides consistency to your CI/CD workflow.
JFrog Artifactory is a tool in the Code Collaboration & Version Control category of a tech stack.

JFrog Artifactory alternatives & related posts

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jFrog

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    Sonatype Nexus

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      Joshua Dean Küpper
      Joshua Dean Küpper
      CEO at Scrayos UG (haftungsbeschränkt) · | 4 upvotes · 3.1K views
      atScrayos UG (haftungsbeschränkt)Scrayos UG (haftungsbeschränkt)
      GitLab
      GitLab
      Sonatype Nexus
      Sonatype Nexus

      We use Sonatype Nexus to store our closed-source java libraries to simplify our deployment and dependency-management. While there are many alternatives, most of them are expensive ( GitLab Enterprise ), monilithic ( @Artifactory ) or only offer SaaS-licences. We preferred the on-premise approach of Nexus and therefore decided to use it.

      We exclusively use the Maven-capabilities and are glad that the modular design of Nexus allows us to run it very lightweight.

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      Spring Boot
      Spring Boot
      AngularJS
      AngularJS
      Apache Maven
      Apache Maven
      Vault
      Vault
      GitLab
      GitLab
      Sonatype Nexus
      Sonatype Nexus
      SonarQube
      SonarQube
      OpenShift
      OpenShift
      Docker
      Docker
      #DeploymentWorkflow

      We use Docker for our #DeploymentWorkflow along with OpenShift SonarQube Sonatype Nexus GitLab Vault Apache Maven AngularJS Spring-Boot

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      BinTray logo

      BinTray

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      Deploy jar and binary files to a public server. Easy integration with Maven, Gradle, Yum and Apt
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      Midhun Harikumar
      Midhun Harikumar
      Senior Associate at Cognizant Technology Solutions · | 2 upvotes · 5.3K views
      BinTray
      BinTray
      Android SDK
      Android SDK
      Travis CI
      Travis CI
      GitHub Pages
      GitHub Pages
      GitHub
      GitHub
      Git
      Git

      Git and GitHub are excellent tools for hosting this open source project. GitHub enables me to do reviews and provides wiki support via GitHub Pages from anywhere. Travis CI is easy to setup and I can pull up my own Android SDK libraries from BinTray .

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      GitHub

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      Ali Soueidan
      Ali Soueidan
      Creative Web Developer at Ali Soueidan · | 16 upvotes · 18.3K views
      npm
      npm
      Babel
      Babel
      PHP
      PHP
      Adobe Illustrator
      Adobe Illustrator
      Asana
      Asana
      ES6
      ES6
      GitHub
      GitHub
      Git
      Git
      JSON
      JSON
      Sass
      Sass
      Pug
      Pug
      JavaScript
      JavaScript
      vuex
      vuex
      Vue.js
      Vue.js

      Application and Data: Since my personal website ( https://alisoueidan.com ) is a SPA I've chosen to use Vue.js, as a framework to create it. After a short skeptical phase I immediately felt in love with the single file component concept! I also used vuex for state management, which makes working with several components, which are communicating with each other even more fun and convenient to use. Of course, using Vue requires using JavaScript as well, since it is the basis of it.

      For markup and style, I used Pug and Sass, since they’re the perfect match to me. I love the clean and strict syntax of both of them and even more that their structure is almost similar. Also, both of them come with an expanded functionality such as mixins, loops and so on related to their “siblings” (HTML and CSS). Both of them require nesting and prevent untidy code, which can be a huge advantage when working in teams. I used JSON to store data (since the data quantity on my website is moderate) – JSON works also good in combo with Pug, using for loops, based on the JSON Objects for example.

      To send my contact form I used PHP, since sending emails using PHP is still relatively convenient, simple and easy done.

      DevOps: Of course, I used Git to do my version management (which I even do in smaller projects like my website just have an additional backup of my code). On top of that I used GitHub since it now supports private repository for free accounts (which I am using for my own). I use Babel to use ES6 functionality such as arrow functions and so on, and still don’t losing cross browser compatibility.

      Side note: I used npm for package management. 🎉

      *Business Tools: * I use Asana to organize my project. This is a big advantage to me, even if I work alone, since “private” projects can get interrupted for some time. By using Asana I still know (even after month of not touching a project) what I’ve done, on which task I was at last working on and what still is to do. Working in Teams (for enterprise I’d take on Jira instead) of course Asana is a Tool which I really love to use as well. All the graphics on my website are SVG which I have created with Adobe Illustrator and adjusted within the SVG code or by using JavaScript or CSS (SASS).

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      Michael Kelly
      Michael Kelly
      Senior Software Engineer at StackShare · | 14 upvotes · 127.6K views
      atACK FoundryACK Foundry
      Bitbucket
      Bitbucket
      GitLab Pages
      GitLab Pages
      GitLab CI
      GitLab CI
      GitHub
      GitHub
      GitLab
      GitLab
      #OpenSourceCloud

      I use GitLab when building side-projects and MVPs. The interface and interactions are close enough to those of GitHub to prevent cognitive switching costs between professional and personal projects hosted on different services.

      GitLab also provides a suite of tools including issue/project management, CI/CD with GitLab CI, and validation/landing pages with GitLab Pages. With everything in one place, on an #OpenSourceCloud GitLab makes it easy for me to manage much larger projects on my own, than would be possible with other solutions or tools.

      It's petty I know, but I can also read the GitLab code diffs far more easily than diffs on GitHub or Bitbucket...they just look better in my opinion.

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      JitPack

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      NuGet

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      The package manager for .NET
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        Michael Kelly
        Michael Kelly
        Senior Software Engineer at StackShare · | 14 upvotes · 127.6K views
        atACK FoundryACK Foundry
        Bitbucket
        Bitbucket
        GitLab Pages
        GitLab Pages
        GitLab CI
        GitLab CI
        GitHub
        GitHub
        GitLab
        GitLab
        #OpenSourceCloud

        I use GitLab when building side-projects and MVPs. The interface and interactions are close enough to those of GitHub to prevent cognitive switching costs between professional and personal projects hosted on different services.

        GitLab also provides a suite of tools including issue/project management, CI/CD with GitLab CI, and validation/landing pages with GitLab Pages. With everything in one place, on an #OpenSourceCloud GitLab makes it easy for me to manage much larger projects on my own, than would be possible with other solutions or tools.

        It's petty I know, but I can also read the GitLab code diffs far more easily than diffs on GitHub or Bitbucket...they just look better in my opinion.

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        Bitbucket
        Bitbucket
        GitLab
        GitLab
        GitHub
        GitHub
        #Githubmarketplace

        A bit difference in GitHub and GitLab though both are Version Control repository management services which provides key component in the software development workflow. A decision of choosing GitHub over GitLab is major leap extension from code management, to deployment and monitoring alongside looking beyond the code base hosting provided best fitted tools for developer communities.

        • Authentication stages - With GitLab you can set and modify people’s permissions according to their role. In GitHub, you can decide if someone gets a read or write access to a repository.
        • Built-In Continuous Integrations - GitLab offers its very own CI for free. No need to use an external CI service. And if you are already used to an external CI, you can obviously integrate with Jenkins, etc whereas GitHub offers various 3rd party integrations – such as Travis CI, CircleCI or Codeship – for running and testing your code. However, there’s no built-in CI solution at the moment.
        • Import/Export Resources - GitLab offers detailed documentation on how to import your data from other vendors – such as GitHub, Bitbucket to GitLab. GitHub, on the other hand, does not offer such detailed documentation for the most common git repositories. However, GitHub offers to use GitHub Importer if you have your source code in Subversion, Mercurial, TFS and others.

        Also when it comes to exporting data, GitLab seems to do a pretty solid job, offering you the ability to export your projects including the following data:

        • Wiki and project repositories
        • Project uploads
        • The configuration including webhooks and services
        • Issues with comments, merge requests with diffs and comments, labels, milestones, snippets, and other project entities.

        GitHub, on the other hand, seems to be more restrictive when it comes to export features of existing GitHub repositories. * Integrations - #githubmarketplace gives you an essence to have multiple and competitive integrations whereas you will find less in the GitLab.

        So go ahead with better understanding.

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        Michael Kelly
        Michael Kelly
        Senior Software Engineer at StackShare · | 14 upvotes · 127.6K views
        atACK FoundryACK Foundry
        Bitbucket
        Bitbucket
        GitLab Pages
        GitLab Pages
        GitLab CI
        GitLab CI
        GitHub
        GitHub
        GitLab
        GitLab
        #OpenSourceCloud

        I use GitLab when building side-projects and MVPs. The interface and interactions are close enough to those of GitHub to prevent cognitive switching costs between professional and personal projects hosted on different services.

        GitLab also provides a suite of tools including issue/project management, CI/CD with GitLab CI, and validation/landing pages with GitLab Pages. With everything in one place, on an #OpenSourceCloud GitLab makes it easy for me to manage much larger projects on my own, than would be possible with other solutions or tools.

        It's petty I know, but I can also read the GitLab code diffs far more easily than diffs on GitHub or Bitbucket...they just look better in my opinion.

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        Tim Abbott
        Tim Abbott
        Founder at Zulip · | 13 upvotes · 110.7K views
        atZulipZulip
        GitLab
        GitLab
        GitHub
        GitHub

        I have mixed feelings on GitHub as a product and our use of it for the Zulip open source project. On the one hand, I do feel that being on GitHub helps people discover Zulip, because we have enough stars (etc.) that we rank highly among projects on the platform. and there is a definite benefit for lowering barriers to contribution (which is important to us) that GitHub has such a dominant position in terms of what everyone has accounts with.

        But even ignoring how one might feel about their new corporate owner (MicroSoft), in a lot of ways GitHub is a bad product for open source projects. Years after the "Dear GitHub" letter, there are still basic gaps in its issue tracker:

        • You can't give someone permission to label/categorize issues without full write access to a project (including ability to merge things to master, post releases, etc.).
        • You can't let anyone with a GitHub account self-assign issues to themselves.
        • Many more similar issues.

        It's embarrassing, because I've talked to GitHub product managers at various open source events about these things for 3 years, and they always agree the thing is important, but then nothing ever improves in the Issues product. Maybe the new management at MicroSoft will fix their product management situation, but if not, I imagine we'll eventually do the migration to GitLab.

        We have a custom bot project, http://github.com/zulip/zulipbot, to deal with some of these issues where possible, and every other large project we talk to does the same thing, more or less.

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        Gradle

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        Apache Maven

        We use Apache Maven because it is a standard. Gradle is very good alternative, but Gradle doesn't provide any advantage for our project. Gradle is slower (without running daemon), need more resources and a learning curve is quite big. Our project can not use a great flexibility of Gradle. On the other hand, Maven is well-know tool integrated in many IDEs, Dockers and so on.

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        Flutter
        Flutter
        Vue.js
        Vue.js
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        Trello
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        notion.so
        Jira
        Jira
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        Application & Data

        Java JavaScript Node.js nginx Ubuntu MongoDB Amazon EC2 Redis Amazon S3 AWS Lambda RabbitMQ Kafka MySQL Spring Boot Dropwizard Vue.js Flutter

        Utilities

        Google Analytics Elasticsearch Amazon Route 53

        DevOps

        GitHub Docker Webpack CircleCI Jenkins Travis CI Gradle Apache Maven

        Cooperation Tools

        Jira notion.so Trello

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        Ganesa Vijayakumar
        Ganesa Vijayakumar
        Full Stack Coder | Module Lead · | 15 upvotes · 197.3K views
        SonarQube
        SonarQube
        Codacy
        Codacy
        Docker
        Docker
        Git
        Git
        Apache Maven
        Apache Maven
        Amazon EC2 Container Service
        Amazon EC2 Container Service
        Microsoft Azure
        Microsoft Azure
        Amazon Route 53
        Amazon Route 53
        Elasticsearch
        Elasticsearch
        Solr
        Solr
        Amazon RDS
        Amazon RDS
        Amazon S3
        Amazon S3
        Heroku
        Heroku
        Hibernate
        Hibernate
        MySQL
        MySQL
        Node.js
        Node.js
        Java
        Java
        Bootstrap
        Bootstrap
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        jQuery Mobile
        jQuery UI
        jQuery UI
        jQuery
        jQuery
        JavaScript
        JavaScript
        React Native
        React Native
        React Router
        React Router
        React
        React

        I'm planning to create a web application and also a mobile application to provide a very good shopping experience to the end customers. Shortly, my application will be aggregate the product details from difference sources and giving a clear picture to the user that when and where to buy that product with best in Quality and cost.

        I have planned to develop this in many milestones for adding N number of features and I have picked my first part to complete the core part (aggregate the product details from different sources).

        As per my work experience and knowledge, I have chosen the followings stacks to this mission.

        UI: I would like to develop this application using React, React Router and React Native since I'm a little bit familiar on this and also most importantly these will help on developing both web and mobile apps. In addition, I'm gonna use the stacks JavaScript, jQuery, jQuery UI, jQuery Mobile, Bootstrap wherever required.

        Service: I have planned to use Java as the main business layer language as I have 7+ years of experience on this I believe I can do better work using Java than other languages. In addition, I'm thinking to use the stacks Node.js.

        Database and ORM: I'm gonna pick MySQL as DB and Hibernate as ORM since I have a piece of good knowledge and also work experience on this combination.

        Search Engine: I need to deal with a large amount of product data and it's in-detailed info to provide enough details to end user at the same time I need to focus on the performance area too. so I have decided to use Solr as a search engine for product search and suggestions. In addition, I'm thinking to replace Solr by Elasticsearch once explored/reviewed enough about Elasticsearch.

        Host: As of now, my plan to complete the application with decent features first and deploy it in a free hosting environment like Docker and Heroku and then once it is stable then I have planned to use the AWS products Amazon S3, EC2, Amazon RDS and Amazon Route 53. I'm not sure about Microsoft Azure that what is the specialty in it than Heroku and Amazon EC2 Container Service. Anyhow, I will do explore these once again and pick the best suite one for my requirement once I reached this level.

        Build and Repositories: I have decided to choose Apache Maven and Git as these are my favorites and also so popular on respectively build and repositories.

        Additional Utilities :) - I would like to choose Codacy for code review as their Startup plan will be very helpful to this application. I'm already experienced with Google CheckStyle and SonarQube even I'm looking something on Codacy.

        Happy Coding! Suggestions are welcome! :)

        Thanks, Ganesa

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        Tymoteusz Paul
        Tymoteusz Paul
        Devops guy at X20X Development LTD · | 11 upvotes · 140.7K views
        Amazon EC2
        Amazon EC2
        LXC
        LXC
        CircleCI
        CircleCI
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        Docker
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        Git
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        Vault
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        Apache Maven
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        Slack
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        Jenkins
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        TeamCity
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        Logstash
        Kibana
        Kibana
        Elasticsearch
        Elasticsearch
        Ansible
        Ansible
        VirtualBox
        VirtualBox
        Vagrant
        Vagrant

        Often enough I have to explain my way of going about setting up a CI/CD pipeline with multiple deployment platforms. Since I am a bit tired of yapping the same every single time, I've decided to write it up and share with the world this way, and send people to read it instead ;). I will explain it on "live-example" of how the Rome got built, basing that current methodology exists only of readme.md and wishes of good luck (as it usually is ;)).

        It always starts with an app, whatever it may be and reading the readmes available while Vagrant and VirtualBox is installing and updating. Following that is the first hurdle to go over - convert all the instruction/scripts into Ansible playbook(s), and only stopping when doing a clear vagrant up or vagrant reload we will have a fully working environment. As our Vagrant environment is now functional, it's time to break it! This is the moment to look for how things can be done better (too rigid/too lose versioning? Sloppy environment setup?) and replace them with the right way to do stuff, one that won't bite us in the backside. This is the point, and the best opportunity, to upcycle the existing way of doing dev environment to produce a proper, production-grade product.

        I should probably digress here for a moment and explain why. I firmly believe that the way you deploy production is the same way you should deploy develop, shy of few debugging-friendly setting. This way you avoid the discrepancy between how production work vs how development works, which almost always causes major pains in the back of the neck, and with use of proper tools should mean no more work for the developers. That's why we start with Vagrant as developer boxes should be as easy as vagrant up, but the meat of our product lies in Ansible which will do meat of the work and can be applied to almost anything: AWS, bare metal, docker, LXC, in open net, behind vpn - you name it.

        We must also give proper consideration to monitoring and logging hoovering at this point. My generic answer here is to grab Elasticsearch, Kibana, and Logstash. While for different use cases there may be better solutions, this one is well battle-tested, performs reasonably and is very easy to scale both vertically (within some limits) and horizontally. Logstash rules are easy to write and are well supported in maintenance through Ansible, which as I've mentioned earlier, are at the very core of things, and creating triggers/reports and alerts based on Elastic and Kibana is generally a breeze, including some quite complex aggregations.

        If we are happy with the state of the Ansible it's time to move on and put all those roles and playbooks to work. Namely, we need something to manage our CI/CD pipelines. For me, the choice is obvious: TeamCity. It's modern, robust and unlike most of the light-weight alternatives, it's transparent. What I mean by that is that it doesn't tell you how to do things, doesn't limit your ways to deploy, or test, or package for that matter. Instead, it provides a developer-friendly and rich playground for your pipelines. You can do most the same with Jenkins, but it has a quite dated look and feel to it, while also missing some key functionality that must be brought in via plugins (like quality REST API which comes built-in with TeamCity). It also comes with all the common-handy plugins like Slack or Apache Maven integration.

        The exact flow between CI and CD varies too greatly from one application to another to describe, so I will outline a few rules that guide me in it: 1. Make build steps as small as possible. This way when something breaks, we know exactly where, without needing to dig and root around. 2. All security credentials besides development environment must be sources from individual Vault instances. Keys to those containers should exist only on the CI/CD box and accessible by a few people (the less the better). This is pretty self-explanatory, as anything besides dev may contain sensitive data and, at times, be public-facing. Because of that appropriate security must be present. TeamCity shines in this department with excellent secrets-management. 3. Every part of the build chain shall consume and produce artifacts. If it creates nothing, it likely shouldn't be its own build. This way if any issue shows up with any environment or version, all developer has to do it is grab appropriate artifacts to reproduce the issue locally. 4. Deployment builds should be directly tied to specific Git branches/tags. This enables much easier tracking of what caused an issue, including automated identifying and tagging the author (nothing like automated regression testing!).

        Speaking of deployments, I generally try to keep it simple but also with a close eye on the wallet. Because of that, I am more than happy with AWS or another cloud provider, but also constantly peeking at the loads and do we get the value of what we are paying for. Often enough the pattern of use is not constantly erratic, but rather has a firm baseline which could be migrated away from the cloud and into bare metal boxes. That is another part where this approach strongly triumphs over the common Docker and CircleCI setup, where you are very much tied in to use cloud providers and getting out is expensive. Here to embrace bare-metal hosting all you need is a help of some container-based self-hosting software, my personal preference is with Proxmox and LXC. Following that all you must write are ansible scripts to manage hardware of Proxmox, similar way as you do for Amazon EC2 (ansible supports both greatly) and you are good to go. One does not exclude another, quite the opposite, as they can live in great synergy and cut your costs dramatically (the heavier your base load, the bigger the savings) while providing production-grade resiliency.

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        GitHub Enterprise

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        CMake

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          Perl
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          Mojolicious

          Mojolicious Perl Redmine Redis AWS CodeCommit Amazon SES PostgreSQL Postman Docker jQuery VirtualBox Sublime Text GitHub Git GitLab CI @DBIx::Class @metacpan @TheBat

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          Apache Ant

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          Russtopia Labs
          Sr. Doodad Imagineer at Russtopia Labs · | 3 upvotes · 20.6K views
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          Gogs
          Gogs

          I installed Gogs after a few repos I planned to use on GitHub disappeared without explanation, and after Microsoft's acquisition of same, it made me think about the over-centralization of community-developed software. A self-hosted solution that enables easy point-and-click mirroring of important repositories for my projects, both in-house and 3rd-party, ensures I won't be bitten by upstream catastrophes. (So far, Microsoft's stewardship has been fine, but always be prepared). It's also a very nice way to host one's own private repos before they're ready for prime-time on github.

          Gogs is written in Go and is easy to install and configure, much more so than GitLab. The only major feature I wish it had is an integrated code review tool.

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          SBT

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