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Meteor vs Redux: What are the differences?

Developers describe Meteor as "An ultra-simple, database-everywhere, data-on-the-wire, pure-Javascript web framework". A Meteor application is a mix of JavaScript that runs inside a client web browser, JavaScript that runs on the Meteor server inside a Node.js container, and all the supporting HTML fragments, CSS rules, and static assets. On the other hand, Redux is detailed as "Predictable state container for JavaScript apps". Redux helps you write applications that behave consistently, run in different environments (client, server, and native), and are easy to test. On top of that, it provides a great developer experience, such as live code editing combined with a time traveling debugger.

Meteor and Redux are primarily classified as "Frameworks (Full Stack)" and "State Management Library" tools respectively.

Some of the features offered by Meteor are:

  • Pure JavaScript
  • Live page updates
  • Clean, powerful data synchronization

On the other hand, Redux provides the following key features:

  • Predictable state
  • Easy testing
  • Works with other view layers besides React

"Real-time", "Full stack, one language" and "Best app dev platform available today" are the key factors why developers consider Meteor; whereas "State is predictable", "Plays well with React and others" and "State stored in a single object tree" are the primary reasons why Redux is favored.

Meteor and Redux are both open source tools. It seems that Redux with 49.5K GitHub stars and 12.8K forks on GitHub has more adoption than Meteor with 41.2K GitHub stars and 5.03K GitHub forks.

Instagram, Intuit, and OpenGov are some of the popular companies that use Redux, whereas Meteor is used by Accenture, Rocket.Chat, and FashionUnited. Redux has a broader approval, being mentioned in 1036 company stacks & 836 developers stacks; compared to Meteor, which is listed in 195 company stacks and 157 developer stacks.

What is Meteor?

A Meteor application is a mix of JavaScript that runs inside a client web browser, JavaScript that runs on the Meteor server inside a Node.js container, and all the supporting HTML fragments, CSS rules, and static assets.

What is Redux?

It helps you write applications that behave consistently, run in different environments (client, server, and native), and are easy to test. t provides a great experience, such as live code editing combined with a time traveling debugger.
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What are some alternatives to Meteor and Redux?
React
Lots of people use React as the V in MVC. Since React makes no assumptions about the rest of your technology stack, it's easy to try it out on a small feature in an existing project.
Angular 2
Angular is a development platform for building mobile and desktop web applications.
Node.js
Node.js uses an event-driven, non-blocking I/O model that makes it lightweight and efficient, perfect for data-intensive real-time applications that run across distributed devices.
ASP.NET
.NET is a developer platform made up of tools, programming languages, and libraries for building many different types of applications.
Rails
Rails is a web-application framework that includes everything needed to create database-backed web applications according to the Model-View-Controller (MVC) pattern.
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Decisions about Meteor and Redux
Glenn 'devalias' Grant
Glenn 'devalias' Grant
Hack. Dev. Transcend. | 5 upvotes 23.4K views
GitLab
GitLab
Git
Git
WebStorm
WebStorm
Amazon DynamoDB
Amazon DynamoDB
AWS CloudFormation
AWS CloudFormation
AWS Lambda
AWS Lambda
Go
Go
Bootstrap
Bootstrap
redux-saga
redux-saga
Redux
Redux
React
React
#JetBrains
#Serverless

Working on a project recently, wanted an easy modern frontend to work with, decoupled from our backend. To get things going quickly, decided to go with React, Redux.js, redux-saga, Bootstrap.

On the backend side, Go is a personal favourite, and wanted to minimize server overheads so went with a #serverless architecture leveraging AWS Lambda, AWS CloudFormation, Amazon DynamoDB, etc.

For IDE/tooling I tend to stick to the #JetBrains tools: WebStorm / Goland.

Obviously using Git, with GitLab private repo's for managing code/issues/etc.

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Yarn
Yarn
Redux
Redux
React
React
jQuery
jQuery
vuex
vuex
Vue.js
Vue.js
MongoDB
MongoDB
Redis
Redis
PostgreSQL
PostgreSQL
Sidekiq
Sidekiq
Rails
Rails
#Font-awesome
#Bulma.io

I'm building a new process management tool. I decided to build with Rails as my backend, using Sidekiq for background jobs. I chose to work with these tools because I've worked with them before and know that they're able to get the job done. They may not be the sexiest tools, but they work and are reliable, which is what I was optimizing for. For data stores, I opted for PostgreSQL and Redis. Because I'm planning on offering dashboards, I wanted a SQL database instead of something like MongoDB that might work early on, but be difficult to use as soon as I want to facilitate aggregate queries.

On the front-end I'm using Vue.js and vuex in combination with #Turbolinks. In effect, I want to render most pages on the server side without key interactions being managed by Vue.js . This is the first project I'm working on where I've explicitly decided not to include jQuery . I have found React and Redux.js more confusing to setup. I appreciate the opinionated approach from the Vue.js community and that things just work together the way that I'd expect. To manage my javascript dependencies, I'm using Yarn .

For CSS frameworks, I'm using #Bulma.io. I really appreciate it's minimal nature and that there are no hard javascript dependencies. And to add a little spice, I'm using #font-awesome.

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Apache Cordova
Apache Cordova
redux-saga
redux-saga
React Native
React Native
AngularJS
AngularJS
Redux
Redux
React
React
#JavascriptMvcFrameworks

We had contemplated a long time which #JavascriptMvcFrameworks to use, React and React Native vs AngularJS and Apache Cordova in both web and mobile. Eventually we chose react over angular since it was quicker to learn, less code for simple apps and quicker integration of third party javascript modules. for the full MVC we added Redux.js for state management and redux-saga for async calls and logic. since we also have mobile app along with the web, we can shere logic and model between web and mobile.

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Gianluca Bargelli
Gianluca Bargelli
MobX
MobX
Redux
Redux
AngularJS
AngularJS
React
React

We started rebuilding our dashboard components using React from AngularJS over 3 years ago and, in order to have predictable client-side state management we introduced Redux.js inside our stack because of the popularity it gained inside the JavaScript community; that said, the number of lines of codes needed to implement even the simplest form was unnecessarily high, from a simple form to a more complex component like our team management page.

By switching our state management to MobX we removed approximately 40% of our boilerplate code and simplified our front-end development flow, which in the ends allowed us to focus more into product features rather than architectural choices.

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Jest
Jest
redux-thunk
redux-thunk
React
React
Redux
Redux
redux-saga
redux-saga

Choosing redux-saga for my async Redux.js middleware, for a React application, instead of the typical redux-thunk .

Redux-saga is much easier to test than Redux-thunk - it requires no module mocking at all. Converting from redux-thunk to redux-saga is easy enough, as you are only refactoring the action creators - not your redux store or your react components. I've linked a github repo that shows the same solution with both, including Jest tests.

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John Barton
John Barton
Founder at Hecate | 7 upvotes 24.3K views
atHecateHecate
Material-UI
Material-UI
Go
Go
PostgreSQL
PostgreSQL
Rails
Rails
MobX
MobX
Redux
Redux
React
React

Frontend choice was basically pre-ordained to be React. Seems like a strong choice on merits alone, plus I needed to learn it to stay current. I never liked Redux.js from the first time I tried to work with it, but a mate had recommended MobX and after watching a few videos I felt like I could fit the mental model of hit in my head. Using Material-UI which is a great timesaver and make sure I throw a few bucks their way every month via the open source collective.

Defaulted to Rails with PostgreSQL just because that's where my past strength as a dev had been. First prototype was in Go but was struggling a bit with the quality of libraries I needed so I went back to old faithful.

As soon as TypeScript was supported by default in Create React App I ported everything over. That combined with swagger code gen has given me really good type safety from the API boundary and above. I semi-regret the Go/Rails decision because I miss the type safety despite pain points with libraries.

I will probably look to flip back to Go gradually (probably via lambda) at a point where it makes sense for the business.

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Cyril Duchon-Doris
Cyril Duchon-Doris
CTO at My Job Glasses | 4 upvotes 168.7K views
atMy Job GlassesMy Job Glasses
Sidekiq
Sidekiq
Rollbar
Rollbar
redux-saga
redux-saga
Redux
Redux
React
React
Rails
Rails

After splitting our monolith into a Rails API + a React Redux.js frontend app, it became a necessity to monitor frontend errors. Our frontend application is not your typical website, and features a lot of interesting SPA mechanics that need to be followed closely (many async flows, redux-saga , etc.) in addition to regular browser incompatibility issues. Rollbar kicks in so that we can monitor every bug that happens on our frontend, and aggregate this with almost 0 work. The number of occurrences and affected browsers on each occurence helps us understand the priority and severity of bugs even when our users don't tell us about them, so we can decide whether we need to fix this bug that was encountered by 1k users in less than a few days days VERSUS telling this SINGLE user to switch browsers because he's using a very outdated version that no one else uses. Now we also use Rollbar with Rails, Sidekiq and even AWS Lambda errors since the interface is quite convenient.

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Priit Kaasik
Priit Kaasik
Engineering Lead at Katana MRP | 4 upvotes 3.1K views
atKatana MRPKatana MRP
redux-saga
redux-saga
Redux
Redux
React
React

Back at early 2017 the confusion and controversy around the future of AngularJS was at full swing. Also, the Angular 2 looked quite restrictive (or prescriptive even) when we did the assessment what to choose for Katana. React came out on top because it's community looked healthier, future more solid. And as you all know, one decision leads to many others: Redux, redux-saga , Axios

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Node.js
Node.js
Meteor
Meteor

Mixmax was originally built using Meteor as a single monolithic app. As more users began to onboard, we started noticing scaling issues, and so we broke out our first microservice: our Compose service, for writing emails and Sequences, was born as a Node.js service. Soon after that, we broke out all recipient searching and storage functionality to another Node.js microservice, our Contacts service. This practice of breaking out microservices in order to help our system more appropriately scale, by being more explicit about each microservice鈥檚 responsibilities, continued as we broke out numerous more microservices.

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AWS Elastic Beanstalk
AWS Elastic Beanstalk
AWS Elastic Load Balancing (ELB)
AWS Elastic Load Balancing (ELB)
nginx
nginx
Go
Go
Amazon EC2
Amazon EC2
Node.js
Node.js
Meteor
Meteor
Mixmax
Mixmax

As Mixmax began to scale super quickly, with more and more customers joining the platform, we started to see that the Meteor app was still having a lot of trouble scaling due to how it tried to provide its reactivity layer. To be honest, this led to a brutal summer of playing Galaxy container whack-a-mole as containers would saturate their CPU and become unresponsive. I鈥檒l never forget hacking away at building a new microservice to relieve the load on the system so that we鈥檇 stop getting paged every 30-40 minutes. Luckily, we鈥檝e never had to do that again! After stabilizing the system, we had to build out two more microservices to provide the necessary reactivity and authentication layers as we rebuilt our Meteor app from the ground up in Node.js. This also had the added benefit of being able to deploy the entire application in the same AWS VPCs. Thankfully, AWS had also released their ALB product so that we didn鈥檛 have to build and maintain our own websocket layer in Amazon EC2. All of our microservices, except for one special Go one, are now in Node with an nginx frontend on each instance, all behind AWS Elastic Load Balancing (ELB) or ALBs running in AWS Elastic Beanstalk.

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Redux
Redux
React
React

I use React because it is well engineered, has a huge community behind it, and allows for modular development (allowing you to handle state management yourself). I've been using React since before 1.0 (or whatever number it was they chose after 0.X). Having said this, I'm not saying other UI libraries are worse. I've barely used the other two big ones.

If using React with a non-trivial application, I heavily recommend using Redux for state management. There is no awful magic or convoluted workflow to Redux (you might not think so when starting on it, but once the light comes on, I hope you'll agree). It's all just loosely coupled state management. Remember to export your connected components separately so you can unit test the component without redux.

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Interest over time
Reviews of Meteor and Redux
Avatar of MichelFloyd
Founder at cloak.ly
Review ofMeteorMeteor

I discovered Meteor thanks to my daughter who used it for a project at MIT. I was amazed at how much she had built in such a short time. I had also been trying to figure out how to build a browser-based crypto app so I jumped into Meteor and had an MVP for cloak.ly in a few short months starting from nothing. Learning Meteor really alters what you perceive as easy and difficult in full-stack development. It has an amazing ability to simplify your thinking and your code. Community support in terms of packages is outstanding as well which saves tremendous time. The quality of the software is outstanding with very few regressions cropping up during their frequent releases.

Being at the bleeding edge of the js community does have its downsides however. While early Meteor (with Blaze/handlebars templates) was exceedingly simple, Meteor have had to introduce support for both angular and react. In combination with the move to ECMAscript this has resulted in a lot of work for developers to just keep up with the evolution of the platform. Someone who was an expert 6 months ago might quickly find themselves being a newb again. If you're someone who doesn't like change you may want to stick to jQuery.

Living in the bay area I have the luxury of being able to attend Meteor events frequently. Having met many members of the MDG team, I have tremendous confidence in the future of the platform. This is a very solid group with a rare combination of broad vision and excellent execution.

Review ofMeteorMeteor

Meteor is my favorite framework. It makes everything fun. Syncing data across devices is really easy and you don't have to mess around with sockets at all. You can insert data into the database on the client. There's tons of security options. There's over 3000 packages on the packaging system. Instant iOS and Android apps. Amazing, reactive routing. Free hosting. Easy deployment with Meteor Up. What's not to like?

Review ofMeteorMeteor

Meteor is so powerful and flexible. I love it. In the near future, it will be the top-used framework.

Review ofMeteorMeteor

We have gone "all in" on Meteor and I recommend you do to.

How developers use Meteor and Redux
Avatar of MOKA Analytics
MOKA Analytics uses ReduxRedux

Though Redux makes encoding some interactions unnatural, the ease of debugging makes it worthwhile. Additionally, Redux makes it easy to implement saving/bookmarking/sharing just by serializing state

Redux's middleware is great for separating concerns, e.g., requests, errors, telemetry, etc.

Our reducers use immutability-helper to update state

Avatar of Kurzor, s.r.o.
Kurzor, s.r.o. uses ReduxRedux

We love functional approach to writing apps and Redux is thus the premium choice in this matter. The inner beauty of the state tree is unbeatable. We recently learned to solve common tasks via middleware. And the Redux Chrome extension is such a marvel - our developers request extra monitors just to have it nearby.

Avatar of Ataccama
Ataccama uses ReduxRedux

Our state management library of choice. Redux has a simple concept, but it's flexible enough and it's React binding library, react-redux, contains a lot of performance-optimized code to make the most out of this combo.

Avatar of Kent Steiner
Kent Steiner uses ReduxRedux

I have been using React/Flux since just about the beginning of React time. Redux is a great upgrade and extension of the core flux concepts, and brings immutable and strict declarative state to the apps I build.

Avatar of cloak.ly
cloak.ly uses MeteorMeteor

Without Meteor cloak.ly could not have been built as quickly by such a small team. Meteor was instrumental to getting an MVP up quickly and dealing with the complexities of browser-based encryption.

Avatar of Promethean TV
Promethean TV uses ReduxRedux

The PrometheanTV Client Web SDK utilizes the Redux state management library to manage the state of overlay rendering during video playback.

Avatar of ShareThis
ShareThis uses MeteorMeteor

Built on Node.js, Meteor's real time reactivity and its wide package ecosystem allows us to quickly prototype and build apps in a lean way

Avatar of Giftstarter
Giftstarter uses MeteorMeteor

We would like to make magic with Meteor for the future of GiftStarter.

Avatar of Hooked
Hooked uses MeteorMeteor

Hooked is built with Meteor as the primary application framework.

Avatar of IVS
IVS uses MeteorMeteor

Typical buzz tech. Nothing practical in here.

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How much does Redux cost?
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