Alternatives to Apache Tomcat logo

Alternatives to Apache Tomcat

JBoss, Microsoft IIS, nginx, Jetty, and Flask are the most popular alternatives and competitors to Apache Tomcat.
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What is Apache Tomcat and what are its top alternatives?

Apache Tomcat powers numerous large-scale, mission-critical web applications across a diverse range of industries and organizations.
Apache Tomcat is a tool in the Web Servers category of a tech stack.
Apache Tomcat is an open source tool with 4.1K GitHub stars and 2.8K GitHub forks. Here’s a link to Apache Tomcat's open source repository on GitHub

Apache Tomcat alternatives & related posts

JBoss logo

JBoss

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An open source Java EE-based application server
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    Apache Tomcat
    nginx logo

    nginx

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    A high performance free open source web server powering busiest sites on the Internet.
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    nginx
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    Apache Tomcat

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    Docker
    Docker
    Docker Compose
    Docker Compose
    Jenkins
    Jenkins
    Kubernetes
    Kubernetes
    Amazon EC2
    Amazon EC2
    Heroku
    Heroku
    FeathersJS
    FeathersJS
    Node.js
    Node.js
    ExpressJS
    ExpressJS
    PostgreSQL
    PostgreSQL
    React
    React
    Redux
    Redux
    Semantic UI React
    Semantic UI React
    AVA
    AVA
    ESLint
    ESLint
    nginx
    nginx
    GitHub
    GitHub
    #Containerized
    #Containers
    #Backend
    #Stack
    #Frontend

    Recently I have been working on an open source stack to help people consolidate their personal health data in a single database so that AI and analytics apps can be run against it to find personalized treatments. We chose to go with a #containerized approach leveraging Docker #containers with a local development environment setup with Docker Compose and nginx for container routing. For the production environment we chose to pull code from GitHub and build/push images using Jenkins and using Kubernetes to deploy to Amazon EC2.

    We also implemented a dashboard app to handle user authentication/authorization, as well as a custom SSO server that runs on Heroku which allows experts to easily visit more than one instance without having to login repeatedly. The #Backend was implemented using my favorite #Stack which consists of FeathersJS on top of Node.js and ExpressJS with PostgreSQL as the main database. The #Frontend was implemented using React, Redux.js, Semantic UI React and the FeathersJS client. Though testing was light on this project, we chose to use AVA as well as ESLint to keep the codebase clean and consistent.

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    Node.js
    Node.js
    Ubuntu
    Ubuntu
    MySQL
    MySQL
    npm
    npm
    Framework7
    Framework7
    Vue.js
    Vue.js
    Webpack
    Webpack
    nginx
    nginx
    #Lenovo
    #HapiJS
    #Framework7
    #Plaid

    I just designed, developed, and deployed my own budgeting app, dailybudget.cc, which allows me to automate my budgeting the way I have always done it, in a way that I could never fully capture with other budgeting apps, such as Mint, EveryDollar, or YNAB. I spent 4 years from the time I first had the idea to the time I actually sat down to design it and start development. During this time I evaluated many other budgeting app solutions, and had even architected a prototype that I never ended up using. But boy, have technologies come much further in 4 years.

    Though my first prototype used Java and Tomcat, I completely abandoned those 4 years later in favor of Node.js technologies, which I have found are equally as stable, more flexible (for better or for worse), and capable of significantly more rapid development. Since what I have deployed now is in beta and is primarily for limited user use, I favored rapid development over slower development where I would write more automated unit tests. I chose to build the app as a HTML5 web application (rather than native iOS or Android, for now), and I used a separated API backend/Web frontend model. My target platform for use with the app is mobile handheld touch devices, though it can work on any laptop or desktop with a touchscreen. Given these design targets, many of the technologies I chose were because of familiarity with them as well as a strong online community, and some technologies I chose that I had to learn anew, because they appeared to fit my needs.

    My entire app runs on a #lenovo IdeaCentre desktop on my home network, on which I have installed Ubuntu 18.04. Ubuntu is something I have switched to after a long time of use and familiarity with RedHat Enterprise Linux and CentOS, because the online support for Ubuntu is now tremendous, and there is so much documentation and examples online of how to configure and use Ubuntu; not to mention I have not been thrilled with the direction new releases of CentOS. Ubuntu is also a good environment for development - it is so easy to follow the many online examples. Lastly, I may migrate my app and configuration to Amazon AWS, which also uses Ubuntu for its EC2 Linux VMs, so having Ubuntu now is helpful for that prospect.

    The API backend uses Node.js, with #HapiJS as the API server framework and MySQL as my persistence database. HapiJS is something I have had familiarity with and is just a phenomenal framework to plug into and configure, especially if you use it for a route-based API. #Mysql has a great online community. I could've used PostgreSQL too, but I am more familiar with MySQL. Also, if I migrate to Amazon AWS, Amazon's RDS uses MySQL. I use npm as a one-stop-shop package manager and environment manager.

    The Web frontend uses a combination of Framework7 and Vue.js. I cannot evangelize Framework7 enough! It is a fantasic tool by @nolimits4web (GitHub) that is really easy to use, really well thought out, and really performant. Framework7 simulates the native iOS or Android (Google Material) experiences, all using HTML5 constructs (HTML+CSS+JS). Vue.js is another very fantastic binding and frontend framework which has a good online community and is well documented and easy to use. I had to choose between VueJS and ReactJS, and ultimately chose VueJS over ReactJS because it seemed to favor more rapid development with less ramp-up time, whereas I understood ReactJS to be more of an enterprise level framework (though still good for smaller projects like mine). When using Framework7 with VueJS, NodeJS is used along with Webpack to transpile my code into browser-friendly JavaScript, HTML, etc. Webpack was nice to use because it has a hot-deploy development mode to enable rapid development without me having stop, recompile, and start my server (this was one of several reasons against using Java with Tomcat). I had no familiarity with Framework7, VueJS, or Webpack prior to this project.

    I use nginx as my web server and have the API running behind a reverse proxy, and all of the web frontent content hosted as static content.

    I use the plaid API to sync my bank transactions to my database. This is another fantastic framework (though not free beyond development use) that it turns out is extremely easy to use for the complex job that it solves.

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    Jetty logo

    Jetty

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    An open-source project providing an HTTP server, HTTP client, and javax.servlet container
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    Apache Tomcat
    Flask logo

    Flask

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    a microframework for Python based on Werkzeug, Jinja 2 and good intentions.
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    Flask
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    Apache Tomcat

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    James Man
    James Man
    Software Engineer at Pinterest · | 23 upvotes · 36.6K views
    Flask
    Flask
    React
    React

    One of our top priorities at Pinterest is fostering a safe and trustworthy experience for all Pinners. As Pinterest’s user base and ads business grow, the review volume has been increasing exponentially, and more content types require moderation support. To solve greater engineering and operational challenges at scale, we needed a highly-reliable and performant system to detect, report, evaluate, and act on abusive content and users and so we created Pinqueue.

    Pinqueue-3.0 serves as a generic platform for content moderation and human labeling. Under the hood, Pinqueue3.0 is a Flask + React app powered by Pinterest’s very own Gestalt UI framework. On the backend, Pinqueue3.0 heavily relies on PinLater, a Pinterest-built reliable asynchronous job execution system, to handle the requests for enqueueing and action-taking. Using PinLater has significantly strengthened Pinqueue3.0’s overall infra with its capability of processing a massive load of events with configurable retry policies.

    Hundreds of millions of people around the world use Pinterest to discover and do what they love, and our job is to protect them from abusive and harmful content. We’re committed to providing an inspirational yet safe experience to all Pinners. Solving trust & safety problems is a joint effort requiring expertise across multiple domains. Pinqueue3.0 not only plays a critical role in responsively taking down unsafe content, it also has become an enabler for future ML/automation initiatives by providing high-quality human labels. Going forward, we will continue to improve the review experience, measure review quality and collaborate with our machine learning teams to solve content moderation beyond manual reviews at an even larger scale.

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    Praveen Mooli
    Praveen Mooli
    Technical Leader at Taylor and Francis · | 11 upvotes · 245.5K views
    MongoDB Atlas
    MongoDB Atlas
    Java
    Java
    Spring Boot
    Spring Boot
    Node.js
    Node.js
    ExpressJS
    ExpressJS
    Python
    Python
    Flask
    Flask
    Amazon Kinesis
    Amazon Kinesis
    Amazon Kinesis Firehose
    Amazon Kinesis Firehose
    Amazon SNS
    Amazon SNS
    Amazon SQS
    Amazon SQS
    AWS Lambda
    AWS Lambda
    Angular 2
    Angular 2
    RxJS
    RxJS
    GitHub
    GitHub
    Travis CI
    Travis CI
    Terraform
    Terraform
    Docker
    Docker
    Serverless
    Serverless
    Amazon RDS
    Amazon RDS
    Amazon DynamoDB
    Amazon DynamoDB
    Amazon S3
    Amazon S3
    #Backend
    #Microservices
    #Eventsourcingframework
    #Webapps
    #Devops
    #Data

    We are in the process of building a modern content platform to deliver our content through various channels. We decided to go with Microservices architecture as we wanted scale. Microservice architecture style is an approach to developing an application as a suite of small independently deployable services built around specific business capabilities. You can gain modularity, extensive parallelism and cost-effective scaling by deploying services across many distributed servers. Microservices modularity facilitates independent updates/deployments, and helps to avoid single point of failure, which can help prevent large-scale outages. We also decided to use Event Driven Architecture pattern which is a popular distributed asynchronous architecture pattern used to produce highly scalable applications. The event-driven architecture is made up of highly decoupled, single-purpose event processing components that asynchronously receive and process events.

    To build our #Backend capabilities we decided to use the following: 1. #Microservices - Java with Spring Boot , Node.js with ExpressJS and Python with Flask 2. #Eventsourcingframework - Amazon Kinesis , Amazon Kinesis Firehose , Amazon SNS , Amazon SQS, AWS Lambda 3. #Data - Amazon RDS , Amazon DynamoDB , Amazon S3 , MongoDB Atlas

    To build #Webapps we decided to use Angular 2 with RxJS

    #Devops - GitHub , Travis CI , Terraform , Docker , Serverless

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    GlassFish logo

    GlassFish

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    The Open Source Java EE Reference Implementation
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      GlassFish
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      Apache Tomcat
      Websphere logo

      Websphere

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      Application and integration middleware
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        Websphere
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        Apache Tomcat

        related Apache HTTP Server posts

        Marcel Kornegoor
        Marcel Kornegoor
        CTO at AT Computing · | 7 upvotes · 22.4K views
        nginx
        nginx
        Apache HTTP Server
        Apache HTTP Server

        nginx or Apache HTTP Server that's the question. The best choice depends on what it needs to serve. In general, Nginx performs better with static content, where Apache and Nginx score roughly the same when it comes to dynamic content. Since most webpages and web-applications use both static and dynamic content, a combination of both platforms may be the best solution.

        Since both webservers are easy to deploy and free to use, setting up a performance or feature comparison test is no big deal. This way you can see what solutions suits your application or content best. Don't forget to look at other aspects, like security, back-end compatibility (easy of integration) and manageability, as well.

        A reasonably good comparison between the two can be found in the link below.

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        Tim Abbott
        Tim Abbott
        Founder at Zulip · | 6 upvotes · 48.4K views
        atZulipZulip
        nginx
        nginx
        Apache HTTP Server
        Apache HTTP Server

        We've been happy with nginx as part of our stack. As an open source web application that folks install on-premise, the configuration system for the webserver is pretty important to us. I have a few complaints (e.g. the configuration syntax for conditionals is a pain), but overall we've found it pretty easy to build a configurable set of options (see link) for how to run Zulip on nginx, both directly and with a remote reverse proxy in front of it, with a minimum of code duplication.

        Certainly I've been a lot happier with it than I was working with Apache HTTP Server in past projects.

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        OpenResty logo

        OpenResty

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        Turning Nginx into a Full-fledged Web App Server
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          Chris McFadden
          Chris McFadden
          VP, Engineering at SparkPost · | 7 upvotes · 86.9K views
          atSparkPostSparkPost
          nginx
          nginx
          OpenResty
          OpenResty
          Lua
          Lua

          We use nginx and OpenResty as our API proxy running on EC2 for auth, caching, and some rate limiting for our dozens of microservices. Since OpenResty support embedded Lua we were able to write a custom access module that calls out to our authentication service with the resource, method, and access token. If that succeeds then critical account info is passed down to the underlying microservice. This proxy approach keeps all authentication and authorization in one place and provides a unified CX for our API users. Nginx is fast and cheap to run though we are always exploring alternatives that are also economical. What do you use?

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          Prometheus
          Prometheus
          Logstash
          Logstash
          nginx
          nginx
          OpenResty
          OpenResty
          Lua
          Lua
          Go
          Go

          At Kong while building an internal tool, we struggled to route metrics to Prometheus and logs to Logstash without incurring too much latency in our metrics collection.

          We replaced nginx with OpenResty on the edge of our tool which allowed us to use the lua-nginx-module to run Lua code that captures metrics and records telemetry data during every request’s log phase. Our code then pushes the metrics to a local aggregator process (written in Go) which in turn exposes them in Prometheus Exposition Format for consumption by Prometheus. This solution reduced the number of components we needed to maintain and is fast thanks to NGINX and LuaJIT.

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          LiteSpeed logo

          LiteSpeed

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          A drop-in Apache replacement and the leading high-performance, high-scalability server
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            Gunicorn logo

            Gunicorn

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            A Python WSGI HTTP Server for UNIX
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            Gunicorn
            Gunicorn
            uWSGI
            uWSGI
            Heroku
            Heroku
            AWS Elastic Beanstalk
            AWS Elastic Beanstalk

            I use Gunicorn because does one thing - it’s a WSGI HTTP server - and it does it well. Deploy it quickly and easily, and let the rest of your stack do what the rest of your stack does well, wherever that may be.

            uWSGI “aims at developing a full stack for building hosting services” - if that’s a thing you need then ok, but I like the principle of doing one thing well, and I deploy to platforms like Heroku and AWS Elastic Beanstalk where the rest of the “hosting service” is provided and managed for me.

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            Cowboy logo

            Cowboy

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            Small, fast, modular HTTP server written in Erlang.
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            Apache Tomcat
            Unicorn logo

            Unicorn

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            Rack HTTP server for fast clients and Unix