Java

Application and Data / Languages & Frameworks / Languages
Engineering Manager at Taylor and Francis·

We are in the process of building a modern content platform to deliver our content through various channels. We decided to go with Microservices architecture as we wanted scale. Microservice architecture style is an approach to developing an application as a suite of small independently deployable services built around specific business capabilities. You can gain modularity, extensive parallelism and cost-effective scaling by deploying services across many distributed servers. Microservices modularity facilitates independent updates/deployments, and helps to avoid single point of failure, which can help prevent large-scale outages. We also decided to use Event Driven Architecture pattern which is a popular distributed asynchronous architecture pattern used to produce highly scalable applications. The event-driven architecture is made up of highly decoupled, single-purpose event processing components that asynchronously receive and process events.

To build our #Backend capabilities we decided to use the following: 1. #Microservices - Java with Spring Boot , Node.js with ExpressJS and Python with Flask 2. #Eventsourcingframework - Amazon Kinesis , Amazon Kinesis Firehose , Amazon SNS , Amazon SQS, AWS Lambda 3. #Data - Amazon RDS , Amazon DynamoDB , Amazon S3 , MongoDB Atlas

To build #Webapps we decided to use Angular 2 with RxJS

#Devops - GitHub , Travis CI , Terraform , Docker , Serverless

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14 upvotes·1 comment·1.8M views
Jon Senterfitt
Jon Senterfitt
·
January 29th 2021 at 7:07AM

But why not just use Contentful?

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Reply
Lead Architect at Fresha·

When you think about test automation, it’s crucial to make it everyone’s responsibility (not just QA Engineers'). We started with Selenium and Java, but with our platform revolving around Ruby, Elixir and JavaScript, QA Engineers were left alone to automate tests. Cypress was the answer, as we could switch to JS and simply involve more people from day one. There's a downside too, as it meant testing on Chrome only, but that was "good enough" for us + if really needed we can always cover some specific cases in a different way.

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27 upvotes·1 comment·944K views
Anand Muley
Anand Muley
·
January 23rd 2020 at 5:23AM

Tech Stacks are going to evolve and be replaced. We will have to keep up with it. Never heard a Developer asking for such a responsibility shift to QA to fix a bug. I have spent some time in an Organization and a Project where test automation responsibility was bestowed upon Developers. It turned out that we did not need any automation QA skilled person we ended up replacing them with Manual QA skilled person. Lets not push our responsibilities to others. There is a reason for keeping a Developer and QA team separate. So that the quality checks are not compromised.

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Reply
Application Developer at FlexSystems Infotech Solutions·
Needs advice
on
Xamarin
and
Java

I'm a C# .NET Core developer. As mobile app development sells more, I hope to upgrade my career to a mobile app developer. I'm looking at Xamarin Forms or Java. What would you advise?

Thanks

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3 upvotes·56.4K views
Replies (1)
Recommends
Xamarin
PhoneGap

It depends. Xamarin is a good jump start for cross dev. But there are other tools that might get you down the road with a simple but catchy portfolio to get some attention from the market. PhoneGap is one of them.

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1 upvote·220 views
Needs advice
on
React
and
AngularJS

I am looking to develop a web application in Java. I want to use a front-end framework for the front-end design, and I am not sure which one to use. For this use case, would you choose to use React or AngularJS? Are there any other frameworks that are easy to learn and have useful features?

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2 upvotes·45.8K views
Replies (1)
Recommends
React
Angular 2

I wouldn't recommend AngularJS, but I assume you mean Angular - the newer version.

I personally will say if it is a large scale application, Angular may be easier to manage, since it's service focused and not state focused. If it is a small / medium scale application, then use React or Vue.js, and you will also be able to scale up the application afterwards.

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3 upvotes·166 views
Needs advice
on
Rust
Ruby
and
Java

Do I choose Rust over Ruby or Java?

Want to try some lower level, highly efficient language. Should I choose Rust over Ruby? I have Java experience and some experience with Ruby.

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2 upvotes·53.9K views
Replies (1)
Recommends
Rust

Ruby is not in a spectrum of "highly efficient" languages. It's interpreted, pretty slow and not concurrent. Java is very good for like 99% of cases, and it's much faster to work with than Rust. But, if you really want to be "close to the metal", Rust is your language of choice. It does not have garbage collector. Memory safety is guaranteed by the language itself. This is great, but the cost of that is pretty steep learning curve. But it's still a lot of fun when you get a grip of it.

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5 upvotes·299 views

Hi everyone! I'm going to work on my FYP soon, and I was wondering which language is the most suitable for making a mobile app? I'm considering Flutter as I have tried it before in mobile development, but I'm more familiar with Java as it was taught in university for system development.

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2 upvotes·35.1K views
Replies (2)
Principal Software Engineer at Dell Technologies·

Hi, Well...It depends. Take this with a grain of salt as I'm not a mobile app developer. I would weigh in some factors. If I would want to go fast, maybe I would make an Android app and use the language that I know, Java or even Kotlin. It really depends on how much time do you have. Alternatives to Flutter you can find here: https://buildfire.com/programming-languages-for-mobile-app-development/. As you already went with Firebase it might be a good option to stick with Flutter as they are both Google products and their integration might work more smoothly. I would also take into account the job market in your area and your personal preference in order to raise your chances to find a good job after you graduate and use your project as actual work experience. I guess it would help to put in some specs related to what you are trying to build, as some frameworks are better suited to do one job, rather than others and hopefully get more specific answers.

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4 upvotes·191 views
Recommends
Flutter

Flutter is a UI framework that uses dart. If you know Java then learning dart will not be too difficult to get going quickly. IMO the Flutter learning curve is much lower than Java android development and Swift IOS development. If the goal is to deliver something quickly without large requirements for performance or extensive native functionalities then Flutter is the way to go, however if the goal is learning then go the route that aligns with that.

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4 upvotes·192 views
Needs advice
on
Telosys
and
JHipster

I would like to generate all the repetitive code in order to bootstrap my Java project. I need to define my own models. I want to be able to customize everything in what will be generated. JHipster is more popular but seems to be really related to the Spring Framework. Telosys supports multi-languages, multi-frameworks, and is highly customizable. Any feedback about these 2 tools?

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7 upvotes·35K views
Replies (1)
Software Engineer ·

I can’t speak for Telosys, since I’ve never heard of it until now. In addition to being designed primarily for Spring Boot-based Java services, JHipster has “blueprints” that can be used to generate functional starter code for Micronaut, Quarkus, Node.js, and .NET applications. (Scroll to “Sample & Sources” here: https://www.jhipster.tech/)

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2 upvotes·3.4K views
Node.js Software Engineer ·

In our company we have think a lot about languages that we're willing to use, there we have considering Java, Python and C++ . All of there languages are old and well developed at fact but that's not ideology of araclx. We've choose a edge technologies such as Node.js , Rust , Kotlin and Go as our programming languages which is some kind of fun. Node.js is one of biggest trends of 2019, same for Go. We want to grow in our company with growth of languages we have choose, and probably when we would choose Java that would be almost impossible because larger languages move on today's market slower, and cannot have big changes.

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17 upvotes·1 comment·195.9K views
max budnick
max budnick
·
July 9th 2020 at 3:29AM

thank you for sharing.

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Reply
Needs advice
on
Notepad++
and
Atom

Recently I decided to learn to code, but it's hard to decide what code editor I should use. I want to learn Java, and I found out that I can code Java on both of them.

What do you think is best for me? Or if ever you have a suggestion, what would it be?

Thank you, Marc

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Atom vs Notepad++ | What are the differences? (stackshare.io)
3 upvotes·252 views
Replies (4)
Sr. Financial Analyst ·

I have used and like them both... here's my take on what to use in your case. 1. Use whatever software your instructor is using when learning a language. It makes it simpler to start. Then change to whatever you like. 2. Use an IDE (Integrated Development Enviroment). For Java I'd pick InteliJ (because I have found the Jetbrains IDEs great) or Visual Studio as a second pick (because it's free for individual coders). 3. Pick your text editor: the Atom vs Notepad++, vs others question Both Atom and Notepad++ offer many features and add-ons, making it a long-disputed competition. This is what drives to chose between one and the other, and I have been alternating: On Atom: The good: - Good looking coding environment - Good autocomplete - Project focused structure to your files The bad: - Higher system resources usage - Slower loading time (if you are opening and closing)

Notepad++ The good: - Very light system resources use - Fast and simple, with decent code higlighting - Loads very fast The bad: - Not as pretty as Atom - Autocomplete and syntax checking is not that good - File-focused editing

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2 upvotes·76 views

I've used Notepad++, Atom, Sublime and recently switched to VS Code. I loved Atom for the UI and how customizable it is. I loved Sublime for it's simplicity. But so far, I like VSCode the best because it seems to handle my projects the best. Least amount of lag on my computer.

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2 upvotes·190 views
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Program Manager ·
Needs advice
on
PyCharm
IntelliJ IDEA
and
Eclipse

UPDATE: Thanks for the great response. I am going to start with VSCode based on the open source and free version that will allow me to grow into other languages, but not cost me a license ..yet.

I have been working with software development for 12 years, but I am just beginning my journey to learn to code. I am starting with Python following the suggestion of some of my coworkers. They are split between Eclipse and IntelliJ IDEA for IDEs that they use and PyCharm is new to me. Which IDE would you suggest for a beginner that will allow expansion to Java, JavaScript, and eventually AngularJS and possibly mobile applications?

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10 upvotes·688.1K views
Replies (12)
Dev at Intel·

Pycharm is great for python development, but can feel sometimes slow and community version has Somme very annoying restrictions (like they disabled jupyter notebooks plugin and made it premium feature). I personally started looking into VS Code as an alternative, and it has some very good potential. I suggest you take it into account.

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15 upvotes·215.9K views
Recommends
PyCharm

The Community version of PyCharm is free and should give you what you need to get started with Python. Both PyCharm and IntelliJ are made by JetBrains. IntelliJ is initially focused on Java but you can get plugins for lots of other things. I subscribe to JetBrains' Toolbox: https://www.jetbrains.com/toolbox-app/ and have access to all of their great tools.

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13 upvotes·215.9K views
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