Alternatives to jsdoc logo

Alternatives to jsdoc

ESDoc, TypeScript, Flow, Postman, and Swagger UI are the most popular alternatives and competitors to jsdoc.
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What is jsdoc and what are its top alternatives?

JSDoc 3 is an API documentation generator for JavaScript, similar to JavaDoc or PHPDoc. You add documentation comments directly to your source code, right along side the code itself. The JSDoc Tool will scan your source code, and generate a complete HTML documentation website for you.
jsdoc is a tool in the Documentation as a Service & Tools category of a tech stack.

Top Alternatives to jsdoc

  • ESDoc

    ESDoc

    It obtains a comment called doc comment from a source code. Then it generates a document from a tag in a doc comment ...

  • TypeScript

    TypeScript

    TypeScript is a language for application-scale JavaScript development. It's a typed superset of JavaScript that compiles to plain JavaScript. ...

  • Flow

    Flow

    Flow is an online collaboration platform that makes it easy for people to create, organize, discuss, and accomplish tasks with anyone, anytime, anywhere. By merging a sleek, intuitive interface with powerful functionality, we're out to revolutionize the way the world's productive teams get things done. ...

  • Postman

    Postman

    It is the only complete API development environment, used by nearly five million developers and more than 100,000 companies worldwide. ...

  • Swagger UI

    Swagger UI

    Swagger UI is a dependency-free collection of HTML, Javascript, and CSS assets that dynamically generate beautiful documentation and sandbox from a Swagger-compliant API ...

  • Apiary

    Apiary

    It takes more than a simple HTML page to thrill your API users. The right tools take weeks of development. Weeks that apiary.io saves. ...

  • Gitbook

    Gitbook

    It is a modern documentation platform where teams can document everything from products, to APIs and internal knowledge-bases. It is a place to think and track ideas for you & your team. ...

  • Docusaurus

    Docusaurus

    Docusaurus is a project for easily building, deploying, and maintaining open source project websites. ...

jsdoc alternatives & related posts

ESDoc logo

ESDoc

5
19
0
Used to generate the documentation of JavaScript projects
5
19
+ 1
0
PROS OF ESDOC
    Be the first to leave a pro
    CONS OF ESDOC
      Be the first to leave a con

      related ESDoc posts

      TypeScript logo

      TypeScript

      52.2K
      41.4K
      462
      A superset of JavaScript that compiles to clean JavaScript output
      52.2K
      41.4K
      + 1
      462
      PROS OF TYPESCRIPT
      • 163
        More intuitive and type safe javascript
      • 97
        Type safe
      • 73
        JavaScript superset
      • 46
        The best AltJS ever
      • 27
        Best AltJS for BackEnd
      • 14
        Powerful type system, including generics & JS features
      • 10
        Nice and seamless hybrid of static and dynamic typing
      • 9
        Aligned with ES development for compatibility
      • 9
        Compile time errors
      • 6
        Structural, rather than nominal, subtyping
      • 5
        Angular
      • 3
        Starts and ends with JavaScript
      CONS OF TYPESCRIPT
      • 4
        Code may look heavy and confusing
      • 2
        Hype

      related TypeScript posts

      Yshay Yaacobi

      Our first experience with .NET core was when we developed our OSS feature management platform - Tweek (https://github.com/soluto/tweek). We wanted to create a solution that is able to run anywhere (super important for OSS), has excellent performance characteristics and can fit in a multi-container architecture. We decided to implement our rule engine processor in F# , our main service was implemented in C# and other components were built using JavaScript / TypeScript and Go.

      Visual Studio Code worked really well for us as well, it worked well with all our polyglot services and the .Net core integration had great cross-platform developer experience (to be fair, F# was a bit trickier) - actually, each of our team members used a different OS (Ubuntu, macos, windows). Our production deployment ran for a time on Docker Swarm until we've decided to adopt Kubernetes with almost seamless migration process.

      After our positive experience of running .Net core workloads in containers and developing Tweek's .Net services on non-windows machines, C# had gained back some of its popularity (originally lost to Node.js), and other teams have been using it for developing microservices, k8s sidecars (like https://github.com/Soluto/airbag), cli tools, serverless functions and other projects...

      See more
      Adebayo Akinlaja
      Engineering Manager at Andela · | 26 upvotes · 794.2K views

      I picked up an idea to develop and it was no brainer I had to go with React for the frontend. I was faced with challenges when it came to what component framework to use. I had worked extensively with Material-UI but I needed something different that would offer me wider range of well customized components (I became pretty slow at styling). I brought in Evergreen after several sampling and reads online but again, after several prototype development against Evergreen—since I was using TypeScript and I had to import custom Type, it felt exhaustive. After I validated Evergreen with the designs of the idea I was developing, I also noticed I might have to do a lot of styling. I later stumbled on Material Kit, the one specifically made for React . It was promising with beautifully crafted components, most of which fits into the designs pages I had on ground.

      A major problem of Material Kit for me is it isn't written in TypeScript and there isn't any plans to support its TypeScript version. I rolled up my sleeve and started converting their components to TypeScript and if you'll ask me, I am still on it.

      In summary, I used the Create React App with TypeScript support and I am spending some time converting Material Kit to TypeScript before I start developing against it. All of these components are going to be hosted on Bit.

      If you feel I am crazy or I have gotten something wrong, I'll be willing to listen to your opinion. Also, if you want to have a share of whatever TypeScript version of Material Kit I end up coming up with, let me know.

      See more
      Flow logo

      Flow

      41
      55
      15
      Simple project and task management for busy teams
      41
      55
      + 1
      15
      PROS OF FLOW
      • 6
        Great for collaboration
      • 6
        Easy to use
      • 3
        Free
      CONS OF FLOW
        Be the first to leave a con

        related Flow posts

        Postman logo

        Postman

        64.5K
        52.6K
        1.8K
        Only complete API development environment
        64.5K
        52.6K
        + 1
        1.8K
        PROS OF POSTMAN
        • 486
          Easy to use
        • 369
          Great tool
        • 275
          Makes developing rest api's easy peasy
        • 156
          Easy setup, looks good
        • 143
          The best api workflow out there
        • 53
          It's the best
        • 53
          History feature
        • 44
          Adds real value to my workflow
        • 42
          Great interface that magically predicts your needs
        • 34
          The best in class app
        • 11
          Can save and share script
        • 9
          Fully featured without looking cluttered
        • 7
          Option to run scrips
        • 7
          Collections
        • 7
          Global/Environment Variables
        • 6
          Dead simple and useful. Excellent
        • 6
          Dark theme easy on the eyes
        • 6
          Shareable Collections
        • 5
          Great integration with newman
        • 5
          Awesome customer support
        • 4
          Documentation
        • 4
          The test script is useful
        • 4
          Simple
        • 3
          Makes testing API's as easy as 1,2,3
        • 3
          Easy as pie
        • 3
          Saves responses
        • 3
          This has simplified my testing significantly
        • 2
          API-network
        • 2
          Mocking API calls with predefined response
        • 2
          I'd recommend it to everyone who works with apis
        • 1
          Graph
        • 1
          Pre-request Script and Test attributes are invaluable
        • 1
          Continuous integration using newman
        • 1
          Now supports GraphQL
        • 1
          Postman Runner CI Integration
        • 1
          Easy to setup, test and provides test storage
        • 0
          Runner
        • 0
          <a href="http://fixbit.com/">useful tool</a>
        CONS OF POSTMAN
        • 9
          Stores credentials in HTTP
        • 7
          Poor GraphQL support
        • 7
          Bloated features and UI
        • 6
          Cumbersome to switch authentication tokens
        • 2
          Expensive
        • 1
          Support websocket
        • 1
          Import curl
        • 1
          Import swagger
        • 1
          Can't prompt for per-request variables

        related Postman posts

        Noah Zoschke
        Engineering Manager at Segment · | 30 upvotes · 2.1M views

        We just launched the Segment Config API (try it out for yourself here) — a set of public REST APIs that enable you to manage your Segment configuration. A public API is only as good as its #documentation. For the API reference doc we are using Postman.

        Postman is an “API development environment”. You download the desktop app, and build API requests by URL and payload. Over time you can build up a set of requests and organize them into a “Postman Collection”. You can generalize a collection with “collection variables”. This allows you to parameterize things like username, password and workspace_name so a user can fill their own values in before making an API call. This makes it possible to use Postman for one-off API tasks instead of writing code.

        Then you can add Markdown content to the entire collection, a folder of related methods, and/or every API method to explain how the APIs work. You can publish a collection and easily share it with a URL.

        This turns Postman from a personal #API utility to full-blown public interactive API documentation. The result is a great looking web page with all the API calls, docs and sample requests and responses in one place. Check out the results here.

        Postman’s powers don’t end here. You can automate Postman with “test scripts” and have it periodically run a collection scripts as “monitors”. We now have #QA around all the APIs in public docs to make sure they are always correct

        Along the way we tried other techniques for documenting APIs like ReadMe.io or Swagger UI. These required a lot of effort to customize.

        Writing and maintaining a Postman collection takes some work, but the resulting documentation site, interactivity and API testing tools are well worth it.

        See more
        Simon Reymann
        Senior Fullstack Developer at QUANTUSflow Software GmbH · | 25 upvotes · 2.1M views

        Our whole Node.js backend stack consists of the following tools:

        • Lerna as a tool for multi package and multi repository management
        • npm as package manager
        • NestJS as Node.js framework
        • TypeScript as programming language
        • ExpressJS as web server
        • Swagger UI for visualizing and interacting with the API’s resources
        • Postman as a tool for API development
        • TypeORM as object relational mapping layer
        • JSON Web Token for access token management

        The main reason we have chosen Node.js over PHP is related to the following artifacts:

        • Made for the web and widely in use: Node.js is a software platform for developing server-side network services. Well-known projects that rely on Node.js include the blogging software Ghost, the project management tool Trello and the operating system WebOS. Node.js requires the JavaScript runtime environment V8, which was specially developed by Google for the popular Chrome browser. This guarantees a very resource-saving architecture, which qualifies Node.js especially for the operation of a web server. Ryan Dahl, the developer of Node.js, released the first stable version on May 27, 2009. He developed Node.js out of dissatisfaction with the possibilities that JavaScript offered at the time. The basic functionality of Node.js has been mapped with JavaScript since the first version, which can be expanded with a large number of different modules. The current package managers (npm or Yarn) for Node.js know more than 1,000,000 of these modules.
        • Fast server-side solutions: Node.js adopts the JavaScript "event-loop" to create non-blocking I/O applications that conveniently serve simultaneous events. With the standard available asynchronous processing within JavaScript/TypeScript, highly scalable, server-side solutions can be realized. The efficient use of the CPU and the RAM is maximized and more simultaneous requests can be processed than with conventional multi-thread servers.
        • A language along the entire stack: Widely used frameworks such as React or AngularJS or Vue.js, which we prefer, are written in JavaScript/TypeScript. If Node.js is now used on the server side, you can use all the advantages of a uniform script language throughout the entire application development. The same language in the back- and frontend simplifies the maintenance of the application and also the coordination within the development team.
        • Flexibility: Node.js sets very few strict dependencies, rules and guidelines and thus grants a high degree of flexibility in application development. There are no strict conventions so that the appropriate architecture, design structures, modules and features can be freely selected for the development.
        See more
        Swagger UI logo

        Swagger UI

        1.5K
        1.4K
        201
        A Collection of HTML, Javascript, and CSS assets that dynamically generate beautiful documentation
        1.5K
        1.4K
        + 1
        201
        PROS OF SWAGGER UI
        • 46
          Open Source
        • 34
          Can execute api calls from the documentation
        • 28
          Free to use
        • 19
          Customizable
        • 14
          Easy to implement in .Net
        • 13
          Mature, clean spec
        • 11
          API Visualization
        • 9
          Coverage
        • 6
          Easy to use
        • 6
          Scaffolding
        • 5
          Vibrant and active community
        • 4
          Elegant
        • 3
          Adopted by tm forum api
        • 2
          Clear for React
        • 1
          Can deploy API to AWS API Gateway and AWS Lambda
        CONS OF SWAGGER UI
        • 2
          Need to learn YAML and RAML
        • 1
          Doesn't generate code snippets in different languages
        • 1
          Documentation doesn't look that good
        • 1
          You don’t actually get in-line error highlighting
        • 1
          Does not support hypermedia

        related Swagger UI posts

        Noah Zoschke
        Engineering Manager at Segment · | 30 upvotes · 2.1M views

        We just launched the Segment Config API (try it out for yourself here) — a set of public REST APIs that enable you to manage your Segment configuration. A public API is only as good as its #documentation. For the API reference doc we are using Postman.

        Postman is an “API development environment”. You download the desktop app, and build API requests by URL and payload. Over time you can build up a set of requests and organize them into a “Postman Collection”. You can generalize a collection with “collection variables”. This allows you to parameterize things like username, password and workspace_name so a user can fill their own values in before making an API call. This makes it possible to use Postman for one-off API tasks instead of writing code.

        Then you can add Markdown content to the entire collection, a folder of related methods, and/or every API method to explain how the APIs work. You can publish a collection and easily share it with a URL.

        This turns Postman from a personal #API utility to full-blown public interactive API documentation. The result is a great looking web page with all the API calls, docs and sample requests and responses in one place. Check out the results here.

        Postman’s powers don’t end here. You can automate Postman with “test scripts” and have it periodically run a collection scripts as “monitors”. We now have #QA around all the APIs in public docs to make sure they are always correct

        Along the way we tried other techniques for documenting APIs like ReadMe.io or Swagger UI. These required a lot of effort to customize.

        Writing and maintaining a Postman collection takes some work, but the resulting documentation site, interactivity and API testing tools are well worth it.

        See more
        Simon Reymann
        Senior Fullstack Developer at QUANTUSflow Software GmbH · | 25 upvotes · 2.1M views

        Our whole Node.js backend stack consists of the following tools:

        • Lerna as a tool for multi package and multi repository management
        • npm as package manager
        • NestJS as Node.js framework
        • TypeScript as programming language
        • ExpressJS as web server
        • Swagger UI for visualizing and interacting with the API’s resources
        • Postman as a tool for API development
        • TypeORM as object relational mapping layer
        • JSON Web Token for access token management

        The main reason we have chosen Node.js over PHP is related to the following artifacts:

        • Made for the web and widely in use: Node.js is a software platform for developing server-side network services. Well-known projects that rely on Node.js include the blogging software Ghost, the project management tool Trello and the operating system WebOS. Node.js requires the JavaScript runtime environment V8, which was specially developed by Google for the popular Chrome browser. This guarantees a very resource-saving architecture, which qualifies Node.js especially for the operation of a web server. Ryan Dahl, the developer of Node.js, released the first stable version on May 27, 2009. He developed Node.js out of dissatisfaction with the possibilities that JavaScript offered at the time. The basic functionality of Node.js has been mapped with JavaScript since the first version, which can be expanded with a large number of different modules. The current package managers (npm or Yarn) for Node.js know more than 1,000,000 of these modules.
        • Fast server-side solutions: Node.js adopts the JavaScript "event-loop" to create non-blocking I/O applications that conveniently serve simultaneous events. With the standard available asynchronous processing within JavaScript/TypeScript, highly scalable, server-side solutions can be realized. The efficient use of the CPU and the RAM is maximized and more simultaneous requests can be processed than with conventional multi-thread servers.
        • A language along the entire stack: Widely used frameworks such as React or AngularJS or Vue.js, which we prefer, are written in JavaScript/TypeScript. If Node.js is now used on the server side, you can use all the advantages of a uniform script language throughout the entire application development. The same language in the back- and frontend simplifies the maintenance of the application and also the coordination within the development team.
        • Flexibility: Node.js sets very few strict dependencies, rules and guidelines and thus grants a high degree of flexibility in application development. There are no strict conventions so that the appropriate architecture, design structures, modules and features can be freely selected for the development.
        See more
        Apiary logo

        Apiary

        220
        275
        108
        Integrated API documentation, prototyping and testing
        220
        275
        + 1
        108
        PROS OF APIARY
        • 28
          Easy to use
        • 19
          Free to use
        • 12
          Traffic inspector
        • 11
          Free
        • 10
          Collaboration
        • 7
          Mock API
        • 4
          Dashboard
        • 3
          Customization
        • 2
          30 Days Trial
        • 2
          Documentation
        • 2
          Access Control
        • 2
          Validate API Documentation
        • 1
          API explorer
        • 1
          Clean syntax
        • 1
          Provisioning
        • 1
          Shared API blueprint templates
        • 1
          Github integration helps with collaboration
        • 1
          Code auto-generation
        CONS OF APIARY
          Be the first to leave a con

          related Apiary posts

          Gitbook logo

          Gitbook

          158
          241
          4
          Document Everything! For you, your users and your team
          158
          241
          + 1
          4
          PROS OF GITBOOK
          • 2
            Prueba
          • 2
            Integrated high-quality editor
          CONS OF GITBOOK
          • 1
            Just sync with GitHub

          related Gitbook posts

          Docusaurus logo

          Docusaurus

          107
          289
          23
          Easy to maintain open source documentation websites
          107
          289
          + 1
          23
          PROS OF DOCUSAURUS
          • 6
            Self Hosted
          • 5
            Open Source
          • 2
            MDX
          • 2
            Jamstack
          • 2
            Easy customization
          • 2
            Free to use
          • 2
            React
          • 1
            I18n
          • 1
            Versioning
          CONS OF DOCUSAURUS
            Be the first to leave a con

            related Docusaurus posts