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ActiveMQ
ActiveMQ

200
235
+ 1
51
Apollo
Apollo

823
583
+ 1
9
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ActiveMQ vs Apollo: What are the differences?

What is ActiveMQ? A message broker written in Java together with a full JMS client. Apache ActiveMQ is fast, supports many Cross Language Clients and Protocols, comes with easy to use Enterprise Integration Patterns and many advanced features while fully supporting JMS 1.1 and J2EE 1.4. Apache ActiveMQ is released under the Apache 2.0 License.

What is Apollo? GraphQL server for Express, Connect, Hapi, Koa and more. Build a universal GraphQL API on top of your existing REST APIs, so you can ship new application features fast without waiting on backend changes.

ActiveMQ can be classified as a tool in the "Message Queue" category, while Apollo is grouped under "Platform as a Service".

"Open source" is the top reason why over 9 developers like ActiveMQ, while over 8 developers mention "From the creators of Meteor" as the leading cause for choosing Apollo.

ActiveMQ and Apollo are both open source tools. Apollo with 7.55K GitHub stars and 940 forks on GitHub appears to be more popular than ActiveMQ with 1.51K GitHub stars and 1.05K GitHub forks.

According to the StackShare community, Apollo has a broader approval, being mentioned in 131 company stacks & 127 developers stacks; compared to ActiveMQ, which is listed in 33 company stacks and 17 developer stacks.

What is ActiveMQ?

Apache ActiveMQ is fast, supports many Cross Language Clients and Protocols, comes with easy to use Enterprise Integration Patterns and many advanced features while fully supporting JMS 1.1 and J2EE 1.4. Apache ActiveMQ is released under the Apache 2.0 License.

What is Apollo?

Build a universal GraphQL API on top of your existing REST APIs, so you can ship new application features fast without waiting on backend changes.
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Why do developers choose ActiveMQ?
Why do developers choose Apollo?

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      What are some alternatives to ActiveMQ and Apollo?
      RabbitMQ
      RabbitMQ gives your applications a common platform to send and receive messages, and your messages a safe place to live until received.
      Kafka
      Kafka is a distributed, partitioned, replicated commit log service. It provides the functionality of a messaging system, but with a unique design.
      Amazon SQS
      Transmit any volume of data, at any level of throughput, without losing messages or requiring other services to be always available. With SQS, you can offload the administrative burden of operating and scaling a highly available messaging cluster, while paying a low price for only what you use.
      Celery
      Celery is an asynchronous task queue/job queue based on distributed message passing. It is focused on real-time operation, but supports scheduling as well.
      ZeroMQ
      The 0MQ lightweight messaging kernel is a library which extends the standard socket interfaces with features traditionally provided by specialised messaging middleware products. 0MQ sockets provide an abstraction of asynchronous message queues, multiple messaging patterns, message filtering (subscriptions), seamless access to multiple transport protocols and more.
      See all alternatives
      Decisions about ActiveMQ and Apollo
      Russel Werner
      Russel Werner
      Lead Engineer at StackShare | 17 upvotes 208.5K views
      atStackShareStackShare
      Redis
      Redis
      CircleCI
      CircleCI
      Webpack
      Webpack
      Amazon CloudFront
      Amazon CloudFront
      Amazon S3
      Amazon S3
      GitHub
      GitHub
      Heroku
      Heroku
      Rails
      Rails
      Node.js
      Node.js
      Apollo
      Apollo
      Glamorous
      Glamorous
      React
      React
      #StackDecisionsLaunch
      #SSR
      #Microservices
      #FrontEndRepoSplit

      StackShare Feed is built entirely with React, Glamorous, and Apollo. One of our objectives with the public launch of the Feed was to enable a Server-side rendered (SSR) experience for our organic search traffic. When you visit the StackShare Feed, and you aren't logged in, you are delivered the Trending feed experience. We use an in-house Node.js rendering microservice to generate this HTML. This microservice needs to run and serve requests independent of our Rails web app. Up until recently, we had a mono-repo with our Rails and React code living happily together and all served from the same web process. In order to deploy our SSR app into a Heroku environment, we needed to split out our front-end application into a separate repo in GitHub. The driving factor in this decision was mostly due to limitations imposed by Heroku specifically with how processes can't communicate with each other. A new SSR app was created in Heroku and linked directly to the frontend repo so it stays in-sync with changes.

      Related to this, we need a way to "deploy" our frontend changes to various server environments without building & releasing the entire Ruby application. We built a hybrid Amazon S3 Amazon CloudFront solution to host our Webpack bundles. A new CircleCI script builds the bundles and uploads them to S3. The final step in our rollout is to update some keys in Redis so our Rails app knows which bundles to serve. The result of these efforts were significant. Our frontend team now moves independently of our backend team, our build & release process takes only a few minutes, we are now using an edge CDN to serve JS assets, and we have pre-rendered React pages!

      #StackDecisionsLaunch #SSR #Microservices #FrontEndRepoSplit

      See more
      Munkhtegsh Munkhbat
      Munkhtegsh Munkhbat
      Software Engineer Consultant at LoanSnap | 9 upvotes 20.2K views
      GraphQL
      GraphQL
      Apollo
      Apollo
      React
      React
      Heroku
      Heroku
      styled-components
      styled-components
      PostgreSQL
      PostgreSQL
      Prisma
      Prisma
      graphql-yoga
      graphql-yoga
      #Backend
      #Frontend

      In my last side project, I built a web posting application that has similar features as Facebook and hosted on Heroku. The user can register an account, create posts, upload images and share with others. I took an advantage of graphql-subscriptions to handle realtime notifications in the comments section. Currently, I'm at the last stage of styling and building layouts.

      For the #Backend I used graphql-yoga, Prisma, GraphQL with PostgreSQL database. For the #FrontEnd: React, styled-components with Apollo. The app is hosted on Heroku.

      See more
      Interest over time
      Reviews of ActiveMQ and Apollo
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      How developers use ActiveMQ and Apollo
      Avatar of Casey Smith
      Casey Smith uses ActiveMQActiveMQ

      Remote broker and local client for incoming data feeds. Local broker for republishing data feeds to other systems.

      Avatar of jasonmjohnson
      jasonmjohnson uses ApolloApollo

      Apollo will be used to make requests to the GraphQL server and manage data handling/caching of responses.

      Avatar of Tanguy Cazalets
      Tanguy Cazalets uses ApolloApollo

      Impl茅mentation de GraphQL

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