Elasticsearch聽vs聽InfluxDB

Need advice about which tool to choose?Ask the StackShare community!

Elasticsearch

24.1K
18.2K
+ 1
1.6K
InfluxDB

831
852
+ 1
163
Add tool

Elasticsearch vs InfluxDB: What are the differences?

Elasticsearch: Open Source, Distributed, RESTful Search Engine. Elasticsearch is a distributed, RESTful search and analytics engine capable of storing data and searching it in near real time. Elasticsearch, Kibana, Beats and Logstash are the Elastic Stack (sometimes called the ELK Stack); InfluxDB: An open-source distributed time series database with no external dependencies. InfluxDB is a scalable datastore for metrics, events, and real-time analytics. It has a built-in HTTP API so you don't have to write any server side code to get up and running InfluxDB is designed to be scalable, simple to install and manage, and fast to get data in and out..

Elasticsearch can be classified as a tool in the "Search as a Service" category, while InfluxDB is grouped under "Databases".

Some of the features offered by Elasticsearch are:

  • Distributed and Highly Available Search Engine.
  • Multi Tenant with Multi Types.
  • Various set of APIs including RESTful

On the other hand, InfluxDB provides the following key features:

  • Time-Centric Functions
  • Scalable Metrics
  • Events

"Powerful api" is the primary reason why developers consider Elasticsearch over the competitors, whereas "Time-series data analysis" was stated as the key factor in picking InfluxDB.

Elasticsearch and InfluxDB are both open source tools. Elasticsearch with 42.4K GitHub stars and 14.2K forks on GitHub appears to be more popular than InfluxDB with 16.7K GitHub stars and 2.39K GitHub forks.

Uber Technologies, Instacart, and Slack are some of the popular companies that use Elasticsearch, whereas InfluxDB is used by trivago, Redox Engine, and Thumbtack. Elasticsearch has a broader approval, being mentioned in 2003 company stacks & 979 developers stacks; compared to InfluxDB, which is listed in 120 company stacks and 39 developer stacks.

Advice on Elasticsearch and InfluxDB
Rana Usman Shahid
Chief Technology Officer at TechAvanza | 5 upvotes 路 134.9K views
Needs advice
on
Firebase
Elasticsearch
and
Algolia

Hey everybody! (1) I am developing an android application. I have data of around 3 million record (less than a TB). I want to save that data in the cloud. Which company provides the best cloud database services that would suit my scenario? It should be secured, long term useable, and provide better services. I decided to use Firebase Realtime database. Should I stick with Firebase or are there any other companies that provide a better service?

(2) I have the functionality of searching data in my app. Same data (less than a TB). Which search solution should I use in this case? I found Elasticsearch and Algolia search. It should be secure and fast. If any other company provides better services than these, please feel free to suggest them.

Thank you!

See more
Replies (2)
Josh Dzielak
Co-Founder & CTO at Orbit | 6 upvotes 路 101.5K views
Recommends
Algolia

Hi Rana, good question! From my Firebase experience, 3 million records is not too big at all, as long as the cost is within reason for you. With Firebase you will be able to access the data from anywhere, including an android app, and implement fine-grained security with JSON rules. The real-time-ness works perfectly. As a fully managed database, Firebase really takes care of everything. The only thing to watch out for is if you need complex query patterns - Firestore (also in the Firebase family) can be a better fit there.

To answer question 2: the right answer will depend on what's most important to you. Algolia is like Firebase is that it is fully-managed, very easy to set up, and has great SDKs for Android. Algolia is really a full-stack search solution in this case, and it is easy to connect with your Firebase data. Bear in mind that Algolia does cost money, so you'll want to make sure the cost is okay for you, but you will save a lot of engineering time and never have to worry about scale. The search-as-you-type performance with Algolia is flawless, as that is a primary aspect of its design. Elasticsearch can store tons of data and has all the flexibility, is hosted for cheap by many cloud services, and has many users. If you haven't done a lot with search before, the learning curve is higher than Algolia for getting the results ranked properly, and there is another learning curve if you want to do the DevOps part yourself. Both are very good platforms for search, Algolia shines when buliding your app is the most important and you don't want to spend many engineering hours, Elasticsearch shines when you have a lot of data and don't mind learning how to run and optimize it.

See more
Mike Endale
Recommends
Cloud Firestore

Rana - we use Cloud Firestore at our startup. It handles many million records without any issues. It provides you the same set of features that the Firebase Realtime Database provides on top of the indexing and security trims. The only thing to watch out for is to make sure your Cloud Functions have proper exception handling and there are no infinite loop in the code. This will be too costly if not caught quickly.

For search; Algolia is a great option, but cost is a real consideration. Indexing large number of records can be cost prohibitive for most projects. Elasticsearch is a solid alternative, but requires a little additional work to configure and maintain if you want to self-host.

Hope this helps.

See more
Needs advice
on
TimescaleDB
MongoDB
and
InfluxDB

We are building an IOT service with heavy write throughput and fewer reads (we need downsampling records). We prefer to have good reliability when comes to data and prefer to have data retention based on policies.

So, we are looking for what is the best underlying DB for ingesting a lot of data and do queries easily

See more
Replies (3)
Yaron Lavi
Recommends
PostgreSQL

We had a similar challenge. We started with DynamoDB, Timescale, and even InfluxDB and Mongo - to eventually settle with PostgreSQL. Assuming the inbound data pipeline in queued (for example, Kinesis/Kafka -> S3 -> and some Lambda functions), PostgreSQL gave us a We had a similar challenge. We started with DynamoDB, Timescale and even InfluxDB and Mongo - to eventually settle with PostgreSQL. Assuming the inbound data pipeline in queued (for example, Kinesis/Kafka -> S3 -> and some Lambda functions), PostgreSQL gave us better performance by far.

See more
Recommends
Druid

Druid is amazing for this use case and is a cloud-native solution that can be deployed on any cloud infrastructure or on Kubernetes. - Easy to scale horizontally - Column Oriented Database - SQL to query data - Streaming and Batch Ingestion - Native search indexes It has feature to work as TimeSeriesDB, Datawarehouse, and has Time-optimized partitioning.

See more
Ankit Malik
Software Developer at CloudCover | 3 upvotes 路 35.9K views
Recommends
Google BigQuery

if you want to find a serverless solution with capability of a lot of storage and SQL kind of capability then google bigquery is the best solution for that.

See more
Decisions about Elasticsearch and InfluxDB
Benoit Larroque
Principal Engineer at Sqreen | 2 upvotes 路 42.9K views

I chose TimescaleDB because to be the backend system of our production monitoring system. We needed to be able to keep track of multiple high cardinality dimensions.

The drawbacks of this decision are our monitoring system is a bit more ad hoc than it used to (New Relic Insights)

We are combining this with Grafana for display and Telegraf for data collection

See more
Get Advice from developers at your company using Private StackShare. Sign up for Private StackShare.
Learn More