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Gatsby
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Next.js

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Gatsby vs Next.js: What are the differences?

Developers describe Gatsby as "Free, open source framework for building blazing fast websites and apps with React". Gatsby lets you build blazing fast sites with your data, whatever the source. Liberate your sites from legacy CMSs and fly into the future. On the other hand, Next.js is detailed as "*A small framework for server-rendered universal JavaScript apps *". Next.js is a minimalistic framework for server-rendered React applications.

Gatsby and Next.js are primarily classified as "Static Site Generators" and "Frameworks (Full Stack)" tools respectively.

"Generated websites are super fast" is the primary reason why developers consider Gatsby over the competitors, whereas "Automatic server rendering and code splitting" was stated as the key factor in picking Next.js.

Gatsby and Next.js are both open source tools. It seems that Next.js with 39.7K GitHub stars and 4.93K forks on GitHub has more adoption than Gatsby with 36.9K GitHub stars and 5.65K GitHub forks.

According to the StackShare community, Gatsby has a broader approval, being mentioned in 66 company stacks & 414 developers stacks; compared to Next.js, which is listed in 118 company stacks and 218 developer stacks.

What is Gatsby?

Gatsby lets you build blazing fast sites with your data, whatever the source. Liberate your sites from legacy CMSs and fly into the future.

What is Next.js?

Next.js is a minimalistic framework for server-rendered React applications.
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    What are some alternatives to Gatsby and Next.js?
    Jekyll
    Think of Jekyll as a file-based CMS, without all the complexity. Jekyll takes your content, renders Markdown and Liquid templates, and spits out a complete, static website ready to be served by Apache, Nginx or another web server. Jekyll is the engine behind GitHub Pages, which you can use to host sites right from your GitHub repositories.
    Hugo
    Hugo is a static site generator written in Go. It is optimized for speed, easy use and configurability. Hugo takes a directory with content and templates and renders them into a full html website. Hugo makes use of markdown files with front matter for meta data.
    Hexo
    Hexo is a fast, simple and powerful blog framework. It parses your posts with Markdown or other render engine and generates static files with the beautiful theme. All of these just take seconds.
    Middleman
    Middleman is a command-line tool for creating static websites using all the shortcuts and tools of the modern web development environment.
    VuePress
    A minimalistic static site generator with a Vue-powered theming system, and a default theme optimized for writing technical documentation. It was created to support the documentation needs of Vue's own sub projects.
    See all alternatives
    Decisions about Gatsby and Next.js
    Todd Gardner
    Todd Gardner
    President at TrackJS | 4 upvotes 48.8K views
    atTrackJSTrackJS
    Gatsby
    Gatsby
    Read the Docs
    Read the Docs
    ReadMe.io
    ReadMe.io
    GitHub Pages
    GitHub Pages
    Jekyll
    Jekyll

    We recently needed to rebuild our documentation site, currently built using Jekyll hosted on GitHub Pages. We wanted to update the content and refresh the style to make it easier to find answers.

    We considered hosted services that could accept our markdown content, like ReadMe.io and Read the Docs, however both seemed expensive for essentially hosting the same platform we already had for free.

    I also looked at the Gatsby Static Site generator to modernize Jekyll. I don't think this is a fit, as our documentation is relatively simple and relies heavily on Markdown. Jekyll excels at Markdown, while Gatsby seemed to struggle with it.

    We chose to stick with the current platform and just refresh our template and style with some add-on JavaScript.

    See more
    Ronan Levesque
    Ronan Levesque
    Software engineer at Algolia | 13 upvotes 86.8K views
    atAlgoliaAlgolia
    React
    React
    Gatsby
    Gatsby
    Ruby
    Ruby
    Middleman
    Middleman

    A few months ago we decided to move our whole static website (www.algolia.com) to a new stack. At the time we were using a website generator called Middleman, written in Ruby. As a team of only front-end developers we didn't feel very comfortable with the language itself, and the time it took to build was not satisfying. We decided to move to Gatsby to take advantage of its use of React , as well as its incredibly high performances in terms of build and page rendering.

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    Divine Bawa
    Divine Bawa
    at PayHub Ghana Limited | 13 upvotes 83K views
    Apollo
    Apollo
    Next.js
    Next.js
    styled-components
    styled-components
    React
    React
    graphql-yoga
    graphql-yoga
    Prisma
    Prisma
    MySQL
    MySQL
    GraphQL
    GraphQL
    Node.js
    Node.js

    I just finished a web app meant for a business that offers training programs for certain professional courses. I chose this stack to test out my skills in graphql and react. I used Node.js , GraphQL , MySQL for the #Backend utilizing Prisma as a database interface for MySQL to provide CRUD APIs and graphql-yoga as a server. For the #frontend I chose React, styled-components for styling, Next.js for routing and SSR and Apollo for data management. I really liked the outcome and I will definitely use this stack in future projects.

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    David Ritsema
    David Ritsema
    Frontend Architect at Herman Miller | 7 upvotes 16.9K views
    atHerman MillerHerman Miller
    prismic.io
    prismic.io
    Next.js
    Next.js
    React
    React
    Node.js
    Node.js

    When we started thinking about technology options for our own Design System, we wanted to focus on two primary goals

    1. Build a design system site using design system components - a living prototype
    2. Explore new ways of working to position our technical capabilities for the future

    We have a small team of developers responsible for the initial build so we knew that we couldn鈥檛 spend too much time maintaining infrastructure on the Backend. We also wanted freedom to make decisions on the Frontend with the ability to adapt over time.

    For this first iteration we decided to use Node.js, React, and Next.js. Content will be managed via headless CMS in prismic.io.

    1. Next.js so that we can run React serverside without worrying about server code.
    2. prismic.io so that our content is accessible via API and our frontend is fully independent.
    See more
    Martin Johannesson
    Martin Johannesson
    Senior Software Developer at IT Minds | 10 upvotes 12K views
    atIT MindsIT Minds
    AMP
    AMP
    PWA
    PWA
    React
    React
    MongoDB
    MongoDB
    Next.js
    Next.js
    GraphQL
    GraphQL
    Apollo
    Apollo
    PostgreSQL
    PostgreSQL
    TypeORM
    TypeORM
    Node.js
    Node.js
    TypeScript
    TypeScript
    #Serverless
    #Backend
    #B2B

    At IT Minds we create customized internal or #B2B web and mobile apps. I have a go to stack that I pitch to our customers consisting of 3 core areas. 1) A data core #backend . 2) A micro #serverless #backend. 3) A user client #frontend.

    For the Data Core I create a backend using TypeScript Node.js and with TypeORM connecting to a PostgreSQL Exposing an action based api with Apollo GraphQL

    For the micro serverless backend, which purpose is verification for authentication, autorization, logins and the likes. It is created with Next.js api pages. Using MongoDB to store essential information, caching etc.

    Finally the frontend is built with React using Next.js , TypeScript and @Apollo. We create the frontend as a PWA and have a AMP landing page by default.

    See more
    Michael Mota
    Michael Mota
    CEO & Founder at AlterEstate | 4 upvotes 545 views
    Next.js
    Next.js
    Graphene
    Graphene
    GraphQL
    GraphQL
    Django
    Django

    I've been using Django for quite a long time and in my opinion I would never switch from it. My company is currently using Django with REST framework and a part in GraphQL using Graphene. On the frontend we use Next.js and so far everything has been running quite good. I've found limitations but manage to solve it.

    As someone mentioned before, if you are comfortable with Django, don't switch. There's no need since with django you can basically achieve anything. Of course this will depend on the project you want to build, but the scalability and flexibility django can offer it's just out of this world. (Don't want to sound like a fan boy haha but it really is).

    See more
    Interest over time
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    How developers use Gatsby and Next.js
    Avatar of CommentBox.io
    CommentBox.io uses GatsbyGatsby

    We use Gatsby.js to render our website server-side for SEO purposes, and blazing fast load times. It also hydrates into a react app, so having dynamic functionality is a breeze.

    Avatar of Michael Manges
    Michael Manges uses GatsbyGatsby

    Static site generator used to build my website.

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