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Visual Studio Code

Visual Studio Code

DevOps / Build, Test, Deploy / Text Editor

Decision at Soluto about Docker Swarm, Kubernetes, Visual Studio Code, Go, TypeScript, JavaScript, C#, F#, .NET

Avatar of Yshayy
Software Engineer ·
Docker SwarmDocker Swarm
KubernetesKubernetes
Visual Studio CodeVisual Studio Code
GoGo
TypeScriptTypeScript
JavaScriptJavaScript
C#C#
F#F#
.NET.NET

Our first experience with .NET core was when we developed our OSS feature management platform - Tweek (https://github.com/soluto/tweek). We wanted to create a solution that is able to run anywhere (super important for OSS), has excellent performance characteristics and can fit in a multi-container architecture. We decided to implement our rule engine processor in F# , our main service was implemented in C# and other components were built using JavaScript / TypeScript and Go.

Visual Studio Code worked really well for us as well, it worked well with all our polyglot services and the .Net core integration had great cross-platform developer experience (to be fair, F# was a bit trickier) - actually, each of our team members used a different OS (Ubuntu, macos, windows). Our production deployment ran for a time on Docker Swarm until we've decided to adopt Kubernetes with almost seamless migration process.

After our positive experience of running .Net core workloads in containers and developing Tweek's .Net services on non-windows machines, C# had gained back some of its popularity (originally lost to Node.js), and other teams have been using it for developing microservices, k8s sidecars (like https://github.com/Soluto/airbag), cli tools, serverless functions and other projects...

17 upvotes·1 comment·26.1K views

Decision about HTML5, Ruby, Babel, Webpack, Visual Studio Code, GraphQL, Graphcool Framework, Figma, TypeScript, JavaScript, Framework7, Css

Avatar of jdspugh
Software Engineer / Project Manager / Technical Architect ·
HTML5HTML5
RubyRuby
BabelBabel
WebpackWebpack
Visual Studio CodeVisual Studio Code
GraphQLGraphQL
Graphcool FrameworkGraphcool Framework
FigmaFigma
TypeScriptTypeScript
JavaScriptJavaScript
Framework7Framework7
#Css

I needed to choose a full stack of tools for cross platform mobile application design & development. After much research, trying different tools, and 18 years of mobile design & development, these are what I came up with that work for me today:

For the client coding I chose Framework7 because of its performance, easy learning curve and very well designed, beautiful UI widgets. I think it's perfect for solo development or small teams. I didn't like React Native. It felt heavy to me and rigid. Framework7 allows the use of #CSS, which I think is the best technology to come out of the #WWW movement. No other tech has been able to allow designers and developers to develop such flexible, high performance, customisable user interface elements that are highly responsive and hardware accelerated before. React Native contains a very limited interpretation of #CSS which I found very frustrating after using #CSS for some years already and knowing its powerful features. The other very nice feature of Framework7 is that you can even build for the browser if you want your app to be available for desktop web browsers. This is not possible with React Native yet.

JavaScript is very far from an ideal language, to say the least. To make life bearable I managed to configure TypeScript to work with the latest version of Framework7. This makes me feel like I'm back in the good old Java days. I consider TypeScript to be one of the rare best creations to come out of Microsoft in some time. They must have an amazing team working on it. It's very powerful and flexible.

For the user interface design and prototyping I use Figma. Figma has an almost identical user interface to Sketch but has the added advantage of being cross platform (MacOS and Windows). Its real-time collaboration features are outstanding and I use them a often as I work mostly on remote projects. Clients can collaborate in real-time and see changes I make as I make them. The clickable prototyping features in Figma are also very well designed and mean I can send clickable prototypes to clients to try user interface updates as they are made and get immediate feedback.

For the UI icons I use Font Awesome Pro. They have the largest selection and best looking icons you can find on the internet.

For the backend I chose Graphcool Framework. It has great customer support and a very accessible free startup plan for working on new projects. I was never a fan of relational databases so I'm very pleased to see NoSQL / GraphQL databases coming to the fore and I'm happy to use them. No more server side API development required! NoSQL databases are so much more flexible and the way I think databases were meant to be from the start.

For the IDE I use Visual Studio Code which is blazingly fast and silky smooth for editing code with the ultimate TypeScript checking (since both products are written by Microsoft).

I use Webpack and Babel to compile the JavaScript. TypeScript can compile to JavaScript directly but Babel offers a few more options and polyfills so you can use the latest JavaScript features today and compile to be backwards compatible with virtually any browser.

I use some Ruby scripts to process images with ImageMagick and pngquant to optimise for size and even auto insert responsive image code into the HTML5. Ruby is the ultimate cross platform scripting language. Even as your scripts become large, Ruby allows you to refactor your code easily and make it Object Oriented if necessary. I find it the quickest and easiest way to maintain certain aspects of my build process.

What tools do you use? Have you tried these ones?

11 upvotes·5 comments·3.1K views

Decision at Codecov about Visual Studio Code, Vue.js, CoffeeScript, JavaScript, TypeScript

Avatar of hootener
CTO at Codecov ·
Visual Studio CodeVisual Studio Code
Vue.jsVue.js
CoffeeScriptCoffeeScript
JavaScriptJavaScript
TypeScriptTypeScript

We chose TypeScript at Codecov when undergoing a recent rewrite of a legacy front end. Our previous front end was a mishmash of vanilla JavaScript and CoffeeScript , and was expanded upon haphazardly as the need arose. Without a unifying set of paradigms and patterns, the CoffeeScript and JavaScript setup was proving hard to maintain and expand upon by an engineering team. During a move to Vue.js , we decided to also make the move to TypeScript. Integrating TypeScript and Vue.js is fairly well understood at this point, so the setup wasn't all that difficult, and we felt that the benefits of incorporating TypeScript would outweigh the required time to set it up and get our engineering team up to speed.

Choosing to add TypeScript has given us one more layer to rely on to help enforce code quality, good standards, and best practices within our engineering organization. One of the biggest benefits for us as an engineering team has been how well our IDEs and editors (e.g., Visual Studio Code ) integrate with and understand TypeScript . This allows developers to catch many more errors at development time instead of relying on run time. The end result is safer (from a type perspective) code and a more efficient coding experience that helps to catch and remove errors with less developer effort.

9 upvotes·21.4K views

Decision at Config Cat about .NET, MySQL, Visual Studio Code, Angular 2, C#, TypeScript, Linode, Frontend, Backend, Configcat

Avatar of ConfigCat
ConfigCat ·
.NET.NET
MySQLMySQL
Visual Studio CodeVisual Studio Code
Angular 2Angular 2
C#C#
TypeScriptTypeScript
LinodeLinode
#Frontend
#Backend
#Configcat

When designing the architecture for #Configcat , we were dreaming of a system that runs on a small scale on low-cost infrastructure at the beginning and scales well later on when the requirements change. Should be platform independent, high performing and robust at the same time. Since most of our team were born and raised using Microsoft's enterprise-grade technologies in the last decade, we wanted to build on that experience. Finding the best solution was quite challenging. Finally, we came up with the idea of a .NET Core backend because it runs on all platforms highly scalable and we could start up with 5$ Linode Linux server. As a #frontend framework, we have chosen Angular mostly because of TypeScript which felt familiar and was easy to get used to after strongly typed languages like C# and the community support behind Angular 2 is awesome. Visual Studio Code makes the coding sessions with Live Share great fun and very productive. MySQL as a database is again is very affordable in the beginning, performs great a scales well and integrates with .NET Core's Entity Framework super easy.

9 upvotes·2.2K views

Decision about Prettier, Git, Magento, Sublime Text, PhpStorm, Visual Studio Code, PHP, Frontend

Avatar of johnnyxbell
Sr. Software Engineer at StackShare ·
PrettierPrettier
GitGit
MagentoMagento
Sublime TextSublime Text
PhpStormPhpStorm
Visual Studio CodeVisual Studio Code
#PHP
#Frontend

I've been in the #frontend game for about 7 years now. I started coding in Sublime Text because all of the tutorials I was doing back then everyone was using it. I found the speed amazing compared to some other tools at the time. I kept using Sublime Text for about 4-5 years.

I find Sublime Text lacks some functionality, after all it is just a text editor rather than a full fledged IDE. I finally converted over to PhpStorm as I was working with Magento and Magento as you know is mainly #PHP based.

This was amazing all the features in PhpStorm I loved, the debugging features, and the control click feature when you click on a dependency or linked file it will take you to that file. It was great.

PhpStorm is kind of slow, I found that Prettier was taking a long time to format my code, and it just was lagging a lot so I was looking for alternatives. After watching some more tutorial videos I noticed that everyone was using Visual Studio Code. So I gave it a go, and its amazing.

It has support for everything I need with the plugins and the integration with Git is amazing. The speed of this IDE is blazing fast, and I wouldn't go back to using PhpStorm anymore. I highly recommend giving Visual Studio Code a try!

9 upvotes·1.6K views

Decision about Visual Studio Code, Atom, Vim, Sublime Text, TextEditor

Avatar of jeromedalbert
Backend Engineer at StackShare ·
Visual Studio CodeVisual Studio Code
AtomAtom
VimVim
Sublime TextSublime Text
#TextEditor

I liked Sublime Text for its speed, simplicity and keyboard shortcuts which synergize well when working on scripting languages like Ruby and JavaScript. I extended the editor with custom Python scripts that improved keyboard navigability such as autofocusing the sidebar when no files are open, or changing tab closing behavior.

But customization can only get you so far, and there were little things that I still had to use the mouse for, such as scrolling, repositioning lines on the screen, selecting the line number of a failing test stack trace from a separate plugin pane, etc. After 3 years of wearily moving my arm and hand to perform the same repetitive tasks, I decided to switch to Vim for 3 reasons:

  • your fingers literally don’t ever need to leave the keyboard home row (I had to remap the escape key though)
  • it is a reliable tool that has been around for more than 30 years and will still be around for the next 30 years
  • I wanted to "look like a hacker" by doing everything inside my terminal and by becoming a better Unix citizen

The learning curve is very steep and it took me a year to master it, but investing time to be truly comfortable with my #TextEditor was more than worth it. To me, Vim comes close to being the perfect editor and I probably won’t need to switch ever again. It feels good to ignore new editors that come out every few years, like Atom and Visual Studio Code.

7 upvotes·3.3K views

Decision at Airbnb about Apollo, GraphQL, Visual Studio Code, Git, GraphQLSchema

Avatar of adamrneary
Engineer at Airbnb ·
ApolloApollo
GraphQLGraphQL
Visual Studio CodeVisual Studio Code
GitGit
#GraphQLSchema

One of the joys I wanted to demonstrate in a GraphQL Summit talk I did is having so many helpful tools at my fingertips while building our product at Airbnb. This includes access to Git in Visual Studio Code, as well as the integrated terminal and tasks for running frequently-needed commands.

Of course, we also had some fun stuff to show for GraphQL and Apollo! The part that most people had not seen was the new Apollo GraphQL VS Code Extension. There is no need for me to copy over all juicy features from their marketing site (there are many!), but I will elaborate on one feature: Schema Tags.

If you are going to lint your queries against the schema you are working on, you will invariably be presented with the decision of “which schema?” The default may be your production schema (“current,” by convention), but as we discuss in the demo, if you need to iterate and explore new ideas, you need the flexibility of targeting a provisional schema.

Since we are using Apollo Engine, publishing multiple schemas using tags allows us this flexibility, and multiple engineers can collaborate on a single proposed schema. Once proposed schema changes for a service are merged upstream and those changes are naturally flowing down in the current production schema, we can flip back to “current” in VS Code. Very cool.

#GraphQLSchema

6 upvotes·2.1K views

Decision at Typeform about Docker Compose, Docker, Git, Vim, Visual Studio Code, Go

Avatar of Denys
Software engineer at Typeform ·
Docker ComposeDocker Compose
DockerDocker
GitGit
VimVim
Visual Studio CodeVisual Studio Code
GoGo
  • Go because it's easy and simple, facilitates collaboration , and also it's fast, scalable, powerful.
  • Visual Studio Code because it has one of the most sophisticated Go language support plugins.
  • Vim because it's Vim
  • Git because it's Git
  • Docker and Docker Compose because it's quick and easy to have reproducible builds/tests with them
  • @Archlinux (wtf it's not here?!) because Docker for Mac/Win is a disaster for the human's central nervous system, and Arch is the coolest Linux distro so far
4 upvotes·1.7K views

Decision about Visual Studio Code, PyCharm, Python

Avatar of alexbenfica
Visual Studio CodeVisual Studio Code
PyCharmPyCharm
#Python

PyCharm is still used for some big #Python projects that I manage... but Visual Studio Code is becoming the main alternative. The huge ecosystem of Visual Studio Code plugins is replacing many of the PyCharm functionalities, and Visual Studio Code is much lighter and faster.

2 upvotes·742 views

Decision at Microsoft about Visual Studio Code, Visual Studio, .NET, Mobile, Games, Machinelearning, AI, Desktop, Web

Avatar of LadyNaggaga
Senior Program Manager - .NET Team at Microsoft ·
Visual Studio CodeVisual Studio Code
Visual StudioVisual Studio
.NET.NET
#Mobile
#Games
#Machinelearning
#AI
#Desktop
#Web

.NET Core is #free, #cross-platform, and #opensource. A developer platform for building all types of apps ( #web apps #mobile #games #machinelearning #AI and #Desktop ).

Developers have chosen .NET for:

Productive: Combined with the extensive class libraries, common APIs, multi-language support, and the powerful tooling provided by the Visual Studio family ( Visual Studio and Visual Studio Code ), .NET is the most productive platform for developers.

Any app: From mobile applications running on iOS, Android and Windows, to Enterprise server applications running on Windows Server and Linux, or high-scale microservices running in the cloud, .NET provides a solution for you.

Performance: .NET is fast. Really fast! The popular TechEmpower benchmark compares web application frameworks with tasks like JSON serialization, database access, and server side template rendering - .NET performs faster than any other popular framework.

2 upvotes·655 views