Visual Studio Code

Visual Studio Code

DevOps / Build, Test, Deploy / Text Editor
Avatar of cartheur
Founder and CTO at cartheur
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at

Problem was wanting to save time and money on converting well-written C# code to Ubuntu. Solution was to use Mono and Visual Studio Code which allowed us to convert our application libraries straight across.

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1 upvote20.8K views
Avatar of lidiexy
Senior Software Engineer at Palinode LLC
Shared insights

As developer at Applied Health Analytics we decided to create a React Native App. In terms of #IDE I'm a good fan of PhpStorm cause we have a lot of PHP in the backend, but I've definitely gave a try to Visual Studio Code and now is my primary JavaScript #IDE. I was impress how fast VS Code has become the No.1 @JavaScript Editor in the community.

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6 upvotes1 comment17.5K views
Ravi Kumar
Ravi Kumar
February 10th 2021 at 2:21PM

Thanks for sharing this informative content, Great work.

To crack Scrum master interview: https://leanpitch.com/blogs/scrum-master-interview-questions

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Avatar of johnnyxbell
Software Engineer at Weedmaps

When I switched to Visual Studio Code 12 months ago from PhpStorm I was in love, it was great. However after using VS Code for a year, I see myself switching back and forth between WebStorm and VS Code. The VS Code plugins are great however I notice Prettier, auto importing of components and linking to the definitions often break, and I have to restart VS Code multiple times a week and sometimes a day.

We use Ruby here so I do like that Visual Studio Code highlights that for me out of the box, with WebStorm I'd need to probably also install RubyMine and have 2 IDE's going at the same time.

Should I stick with Visual Studio Code, or switch to something else? #help

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Johnny Bell's Stack Decision | StackShare (stackshare.io)
11 upvotes287.4K views
Replies (14)
Recommends
RubyMineRubyMine

If you're working with both Ruby and JavaScript, buy RubyMine and shut down the other two. It's much better for Ruby than Visual Studio Code is. It can also do everything WebStorm does, if you install the plugins you need from JetBrains, and they all work together nicely.

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11 upvotes35.2K views
Avatar of marcsw2
Software Developer
Recommends
RubyMineRubyMine

If you install RubyMine, you shouldn't need WebStorm, as all the functionality of WebStorm appears to be included in RubyMine. (See here: https://softwareengineering.stackexchange.com/a/132950).

I've used PhpStorm for several years and have never needed to open (or even download) WebStorm for anything front-end or JavaScript related.

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9 upvotes1 comment35.2K views
Johnny Bell
Johnny Bell
August 16th 2019 at 3:15AM

Marc, I was using PhpStorm for like 7 years when I was in magento and a PHP backend and I never needed WebStorm either as it had all the same features... you are convincing me to switch to RubyMine... Hmmmmmm 馃

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Avatar of johnnyxbell
Software Engineer at Weedmaps
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Visual Studio CodeVisual Studio Code

Prettier not formatting code on save in Visual Studio Code? - I've come across the same issue and took me a long time googling around to find the issue.

It is actually a very simple fix. Add the below to your Visual Studio Code settings.json

"[javascript]": {
    "editor.formatOnSave": true
},
"[javascriptreact]": {
  "editor.formatOnSave": true
}
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9 upvotes28K views
Avatar of zimoony
Senior Fullstack Developer at QUANTUSflow Software GmbH

Our whole DevOps stack consists of the following tools:

  • GitHub (incl. GitHub Pages/Markdown for Documentation, GettingStarted and HowTo's) for collaborative review and code management tool
  • Respectively Git as revision control system
  • SourceTree as Git GUI
  • Visual Studio Code as IDE
  • CircleCI for continuous integration (automatize development process)
  • Prettier / TSLint / ESLint as code linter
  • SonarQube as quality gate
  • Docker as container management (incl. Docker Compose for multi-container application management)
  • VirtualBox for operating system simulation tests
  • Kubernetes as cluster management for docker containers
  • Heroku for deploying in test environments
  • nginx as web server (preferably used as facade server in production environment)
  • SSLMate (using OpenSSL) for certificate management
  • Amazon EC2 (incl. Amazon S3) for deploying in stage (production-like) and production environments
  • PostgreSQL as preferred database system
  • Redis as preferred in-memory database/store (great for caching)

The main reason we have chosen Kubernetes over Docker Swarm is related to the following artifacts:

  • Key features: Easy and flexible installation, Clear dashboard, Great scaling operations, Monitoring is an integral part, Great load balancing concepts, Monitors the condition and ensures compensation in the event of failure.
  • Applications: An application can be deployed using a combination of pods, deployments, and services (or micro-services).
  • Functionality: Kubernetes as a complex installation and setup process, but it not as limited as Docker Swarm.
  • Monitoring: It supports multiple versions of logging and monitoring when the services are deployed within the cluster (Elasticsearch/Kibana (ELK), Heapster/Grafana, Sysdig cloud integration).
  • Scalability: All-in-one framework for distributed systems.
  • Other Benefits: Kubernetes is backed by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), huge community among container orchestration tools, it is an open source and modular tool that works with any OS.
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28 upvotes2 comments2.2M views
Larry Gryziak
Larry Gryziak
April 30th 2020 at 6:34PM

So why is your deployment different for your (Heroku) test/dev and your stage/production?

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Simon Reymann
Simon Reymann
May 1st 2020 at 10:32AM

When it comes to testing our web app we do not demand great computational resources and need a very simple, convenient and fast PaaS solution for deploying the app to our testers. In production though, the demand of great computational resources can rise very fast. With Amazon we are able to control that in better way.

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Repost

Overview: To put it simply, we plan to use the MERN stack to build our web application. MongoDB will be used as our primary database. We will use ExpressJS alongside Node.js to set up our API endpoints. Additionally, we plan to use React to build our SPA on the client side and use Redis on the server side as our primary caching solution. Initially, while working on the project, we plan to deploy our server and client both on Heroku . However, Heroku is very limited and we will need the benefits of an Infrastructure as a Service so we will use Amazon EC2 to later deploy our final version of the application.

Serverside: nodemon will allow us to automatically restart a running instance of our node app when files changes take place. We decided to use MongoDB because it is a non relational database which uses the Document Object Model. This allows a lot of flexibility as compared to a RDMS like SQL which requires a very structural model of data that does not change too much. Another strength of MongoDB is its ease in scalability. We will use Mongoose along side MongoDB to model our application data. Additionally, we will host our MongoDB cluster remotely on MongoDB Atlas. Bcrypt will be used to encrypt user passwords that will be stored in the DB. This is to avoid the risks of storing plain text passwords. Moreover, we will use Cloudinary to store images uploaded by the user. We will also use the Twilio SendGrid API to enable automated emails sent by our application. To protect private API endpoints, we will use JSON Web Token and Passport. Also, PayPal will be used as a payment gateway to accept payments from users.

Client Side: As mentioned earlier, we will use React to build our SPA. React uses a virtual DOM which is very efficient in rendering a page. Also React will allow us to reuse components. Furthermore, it is very popular and there is a large community that uses React so it can be helpful if we run into issues. We also plan to make a cross platform mobile application later and using React will allow us to reuse a lot of our code with React Native. Redux will be used to manage state. Redux works great with React and will help us manage a global state in the app and avoid the complications of each component having its own state. Additionally, we will use Bootstrap components and custom CSS to style our app.

Other: Git will be used for version control. During the later stages of our project, we will use Google Analytics to collect useful data regarding user interactions. Moreover, Slack will be our primary communication tool. Also, we will use Visual Studio Code as our primary code editor because it is very light weight and has a wide variety of extensions that will boost productivity. Postman will be used to interact with and debug our API endpoints.

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17 upvotes2 comments278.9K views
Ne Labs
Ne Labs
March 9th 2020 at 12:34PM

RDBMS like Postgres can also store, index and query schemaless data as JSON fields, while also supporting relations where it makes sense. A document model is actually a downside, since usually data will still have relations, and it makes modeling them inconvenient.

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John Akhilomen
John Akhilomen
April 1st 2020 at 3:00PM

I like the tech stack you guys have selected. You guys seem to have it all figured out, and well planned. Good luck!

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Needs advice
on
VimVim
and
NeovimNeovim

For a Visual Studio Code/Atom developer that works mostly with Node.js/TypeScript/Ruby/Go and wants to get rid of graphic-text-editors-IDE-like at once, which one is worthy of investing time to pick up?

I'm a total n00b on the subject, but I've read good things about Neovim's Lua support, and I wonder what would be the VIM response/approach for it?

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7 upvotes20.3K views
Replies (5)
Recommends
VimVimNeovimNeovim

Neovim can basically do everything Vim can with one major advantage - the number of contributors to the code base is just so much wider (Vim is ~100% maintained only by B. Mooleanaar). Whatever you learn for Neovim you can also apply to Vim and vice versa. And of course there is the never ending Vim vs Emacs controversy - but better not get into that war.

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9 upvotes1 comment14.4K views
David Milosevic
David Milosevic
January 13th 2021 at 7:06AM

For web development definitely NeoVim. It supports more plugins, especially themes. Vim is more for scripting and server related stuff, it is more raw. NeoVim is literally described by it's name..

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Actually, the biggest advantage with Neovim (as a VS user) is that you can embed REAL Neovim as the editor UI, rather than using a "Vim emulation", you're using actual NVIM, embedded in VS!

"asvetliakov.vscode-neovim" is the extension you are looking for:

  1. Install the 'vscode-neovim; extension (https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=asvetliakov.vscode-neovim)
  2. Install Neovim version 0.5+ nightly
  3. Start winning.

(You can install neovim-nightly separately for just vscode, I usually build and install it to /opt/nvim - it's enough enough to do - let me know if you need help).

Works wonderfully. It might not work out of the box if you have some 100K epic nvim initialization file, but the plugin documents a workaround for having an embedding/VS specific configuration.

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5 upvotes12.4K views
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I am a QA heading to a new company where they all generally use Visual Studio Code, my experience is with IntelliJ IDEA and PyCharm. The language they use is JavaScript and so I will be writing my test framework in javaScript so the devs can more easily write tests without context switching.

My 2 questions: Does VS Code have Cucumber Plugins allowing me to write behave tests? And more importantly, does VS Code have the same refactoring tools that IntelliJ IDEA has? I love that I have easy access to a range of tools that allow me to refactor and simplify my code, making code writing really easy.

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6 upvotes50.7K views
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Avatar of stapetro
Senior Software Engineer at GfK
Recommends
IntelliJ IDEAIntelliJ IDEA

I use Intellij IDEA Ultimate for javascript development and testing. Everything is configured and run smoothly. Visual Studio Code is a basic editor with a rich set of plugins. Making them to work smoothly is challenging sometimes. If you don't have a license for the Ultimate Edition, you can use Intellij EAP builds. The best judgement is to test both tools and see where you perform your work more efficiently. I'd recommend Intellij IDEA IDE for professional development.

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3 upvotes10.2K views

Hey there, I am using Visual Studio for C++ and Notepad++ for web development. Should I switch to Visual Studio or Visual Studio Code for web development?

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2 upvotes7.3K views
Replies (3)
Recommends
Visual StudioVisual Studio

You should absolutely switch to Visual Studio Code for web development. The suite of plugins offered for every task is phenomenal, and you'll find a lot of support among the community. Web development often requires full-stack comprehension for both the developer and for the IDE. Visual Studio Code (via the assistance of plugins) is fluent in so many different languages and files, and the git integration is pure zen.

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7 upvotes116 views
Avatar of ronier2332
Software Developer

VSCode is the most used tool for web development right now. It has a great number of extensions that will help you simplify your work. It's also lighter that Visual Studio, which is mostly used for C# and the Microsoft stack.

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2 upvotes1 comment112 views
Curious Mind
Curious Mind
January 13th 2021 at 6:44AM

thanks switched a few days ago. VS code is awesome.

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